In mid-February, the Linux Foundation announced it had signed a collaboration agreement with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), enabling US Government suppliers to collaborate on a common open source platform that will enable the adoption of 5G wireless and edge technologies by the government. Governments face similar issues to enterprise end-users — if all their suppliers deliver incompatible solutions, the integration burden escalates exponentially.  

The first collaboration, Open Programmable Secure 5G (OPS-5G), currently in the formative stages, will be used to create open source software and systems enabling end-to-end 5G and follow-on mobile networks. 

The road to open source influencing 5G: The First, Second, and Third Waves of Open Source

If we examine the history of open source, it is informative to observe it from the perspective of evolutionary waves. Many open-source projects began as single technical projects, with specific objectives, such as building an operating system kernel or an application. This isolated, single project approach can be viewed as the first wave of open source.

We can view the second wave of open source as creating platforms seeking to address a broad horizontal solution, such as a cloud or networking stack or a machine learning and data platform.

The third wave of open source collaboration goes beyond isolated projects and integrates them for a common platform for a specific industry vertical. Additionally, the third wave often focuses on reducing fragmentation — you commonly will see a conformance program or a specification or standard that anyone in the industry can cite in procurement contracts.

Industry conformance becomes important as specific solutions are taken to market and how cross-industry solutions are being built — especially now that we have technologies requiring cross-industry interaction, such as end-to-end 5G, the edge, or even cloud-native applications and environments that span any industry vertical. 

The third wave of open source also seeks to provide comprehensive end-to-end solutions for enterprises and verticals, large institutional organizations, and government agencies. In this case, the community of government suppliers will be building an open source 5G stack used in enterprise networking applications. The end-to-end open source integration and collaboration supported by commercial investment with innovative products, services, and solutions accelerate the technology adoption and transformation.

Why DARPA chose to partner with the Linux Foundation

DARPA at the US Department of Defense has tens of thousands of contractors supplying networking solutions for government facilities and remote locations. However, it doesn’t want dozens, hundreds, or thousands of unique and incompatible hardware and software solutions originating from its large contractor and supplier ecosystem. Instead, it desires a portable and open access standard to provide transparency to enable advanced software tools and systems to be applied to a common code base various groups in the government could build on. The goal is to have a common framework that decouples hardware and software requirements and enabling adoption by more groups within the government.

Naturally, as a large end-user, the government wants its suppliers to focus on delivering secure solutions. A common framework can ideally decrease the security complexity versus having disparate, fragmented systems. 

The Linux Foundation is also the home of nearly all the important open source projects in the 5G and networking space. Out of the $54B of the Linux Foundation community software projects that have been valued using the COCOMO2 model, the open source projects assisting with building a 5G stack are estimated to be worth about $25B in shared technology investment. The LF Networking projects have been valued at $7.4B just by themselves. 

The support programs at Linux Foundation provide the key foundations for a shared community innovations pool. These programs include IP structure and legal frameworks, an open and transparent development process, neutral governance, conformance, and DevOps infrastructure for end-to-end project lifecycle and code management. Therefore, it is uniquely suited to be the home for a community-driven effort to define an open source 5G end-to-end architecture, create and run the open source projects that embody that architecture, and support its integration for scaling-out and accelerating adoption.

The foundations of a complete open source 5G stack

The Linux Foundation worked in the telecommunications industry early on in its existence, starting with the Carrier Grade Linux initiatives to identify requirements and building features to enable the Linux kernel to address telco requirements. In 2013, The Linux Foundation’s open source networking platform started with bespoke projects such as OpenDaylight, the software-defined networking controller. OPNFV (now Anuket), the network function virtualization stack, was introduced in 2014-2015, followed by the first release of Tungsten Fabric, the automated software-defined networking stack. FD.io, the secure networking data plane, was announced in 2016, a sister project of the Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) released into open source in 2010.


Linux Foundation & Other Open Source Component Projects for 5G

At the time, the telecom/network and wireless carrier industry sought to commoditize and accelerate innovation across a specific piece of the stack as software-defined networking became part of their digital transformation. Since the introduction of these projects at LFN, the industry has seen heavy adoption and significant community contribution by the largest telecom carriers and service providers worldwide. This history is chronicled in detail in our whitepaper, Software-Defined Vertical Industries: Transformation Through Open Source.

The work that the member companies will focus on will require robust frameworks for ensuring changes to these projects are contributed back upstream into the source projects. Upstreaming, which is a key benefit to open source collaboration, allows the contributions specific to this 5G effort to roll back into their originating projects, thus improving the software for every end-user and effort that uses them.

The Linux Foundation networking stack continues to evolve and expand into additional projects due to an increased desire to innovate and commoditize across key technology areas through shared investments among its members. In February of 2021, Facebook contributed the Magma project, which transcends platform infrastructure such as the others listed above. Instead, it is a network function application that is core to 5G network operations. 

The E2E 5G Super Blueprint is being developed by the LFN Demo working group. This is an open collaboration and we encourage you to join us. Learn more here.

Building through organic growth and cross-pollination of the open source networking and cloud community

Tier 2 operators, rural operators, and governments worldwide want to reap the benefits of economic innovation as well as potential cost-savings from 5G. How is this accomplished?

With this joint announcement and its DARPA supplier community collaboration, the Linux Foundation’s existing projects can help serve the requirements of other large end-users. Open source communities are advancing and innovating some of the most important and exciting technologies of our time. It’s always interesting to have an opportunity to apply the results of these communities to new use cases. 

The Linux Foundation understands the critical dynamic of cross-pollination between community-driven open source projects needed to help make an ecosystem successful. Its proven governance model has demonstrated the ability to maintain and mature open source projects over time and make them all work together in one single, cohesive ecosystem. 

As a broad set of contributors work on components of an open source stack for 5G, there will be cross-community interactions. For example, that means that Project EVE, the cloud-native edge computing platform, will potentially be working with Project Zephyr, the scalable real-time operating system (RTOS) kernel, so that Eve can potentially orchestrate Zephyr devices. It’s all based on contributors’ self-interests and motivations to contribute functionality that enables these projects to work together. Similarly, ONAP, the network automation/orchestration platform, is tightly integrated with Akraino so that it has architectural deployment templates built around network edge clouds and multi-edge clouds. 

An open source platform has implications not just for new business opportunities for government suppliers but also for other institutions. The projects within an open source platform have open interfaces that can be integrated and used with other software so that other large end-users like the World Bank, can have validated and tested architectural blueprints, with which can go ahead and deploy effective 5G solutions in the marketplace in many host countries, providing them a turnkey stack. This will enable them to encourage providers through competition or challenges native to their in-country commercial ecosystem to implement those networks. 

This is a true solutions-oriented open source for 5G stack for enterprises, governments, and the world. 

New Janssen Project seeks to build the world’s fastest and most comprehensive cloud native identity and access management software platform

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., December 8, 2020 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the Janssen Project, a cloud native identity and access management software platform that prioritizes security and performance for our digital society. Janssen is based on the Gluu Server and benefits from a rich set of signing and encryption functionalities. Engineers from IDEMIA, F5, BioID, Couchbase and Gluu will make up the Technical Steering Committee.

Online trust is a fundamental challenge to our digital society. The Internet has connected us. But at the same time, it has undermined trust. Digital identity starts with a connection between a person and a digital device. Identity software conveys the integrity of that connection from the user’s device to a complex web of backend services. Solving the challenge of digital identity is foundational to achieving trustworthy online security.

While other identity and access management platforms exist, the Janssen Project seeks to tackle the most challenging security and performance requirements. Based on the latest code that powers the Gluu Server–which has passed more OpenID self-certification tests than any other platform–Janssen starts with a rich set of signing and encryption functionality that can be used for high assurance transactions. Having shown throughput of more than one billion authentications per day, the software can also handle the most demanding requirements for concurrency thanks to Kubernetes auto-scaling and advances in persistence.

“Trust and security are not competitive advantages–no one wins in an insecure society with low trust,” said Mike Schwartz, Chair of the Janssen Project Technical Steering Committee. “In the world of software, nothing builds trust like the open source development methodology. For organizations who cannot outsource trust, the Janssen Project strives to bring transparency, best practices and collective governance to the long-term maintenance of this important effort. The Linux Foundation provides the neutral and proven forum for organizations to collaborate on this work.”

The Gluu engineering teams chose the Linux Foundation to host this community because of the Foundation’s priority of transparency in the development process and its formal framework for governance to facilitate collaboration among commercial partners.

New digital identity challenges arise constantly, and new standards are developed to address them. Open source ecosystems are an engine for innovation to filter and adapt to changing requirements. The Janssen Project Technical Steering Committee (“TSC”) will help govern priorities according to the charter.  The initial TSC includes:

  • Michael Schwartz, TSC Chair, CEO Gluu
  • Rajesh Bavanantham, Domain Architect at F5 Networks/NGiNX
  • Rod Boothby, Head of Digital Trust at Santander
  • Will Cayo, Director of Software Engineering at IDEMIA Digital Labs
  • Ian McCloy, Principal Product Manager at Couchbase
  • Alexander Werner, Software Engineer at BioID

For more information, see the project Github site: https://github.com/JanssenProject

Supporting Comments

BioID

“BioID’s biometric authentication service provides GDPR compliant, device independent, 3D liveness detection and facial recognition APIs, supported out-of-the-box by the Janssen project. Exposing BioID’s capabilities via OpenID Connect makes sense in many cases, especially as part of the rollout for a large organization.  The availability of a high-quality open source implementation of OpenID Connect gives us more options to build products and to expand the options for our customers to deploy our technology,” said Alexander Werner, Software Engineer at BioID.

Couchbase

“The Couchbase database is supported today in the Janssen project for both caching and persistence. This makes sense given the distributed, elastic, in-memory requirements for a multi-cloud, hyper-scale identity service. Contributing to this project aligns with our goal to advance open source infrastructure software that results in more options for the Couchbase community,” said Ian McCloy, Principal Product Manager at Couchbase.

F5

“It’s an immense pleasure to join the Janssen Project, as it’s aimed to improve the performance, reliability and security on OAuth2 Components that are similar to NGINX Principles. Being part of Linux Foundation, the Janssen Project will be well governed and evolve with the open source community to achieve its goals,” said Rajesh Bavanantham, F5.

IDEMIA

“I have been a part of the Gluu community for many years. I’m excited to see the project moving to the Linux Foundation where we can collaborate with an even larger ecosystem of individuals and companies,” said Will Cayo, IDEMIA.

 

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,500 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

 

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

Media Contact
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Story Changes Culture
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New hybrid-mode architecture expands the scope of the project to include industrial IoT and edge device use cases, delivers new flexibility in resource sharing across virtual machines and new levels of real-time and functional safety

San Francisco, Calif., July 21, 2020 – Project ACRN™, an open source IoT hypervisor hosted at the Linux Foundation, today is announcing ACRN v2.0, which expands the scope of the project and introduces a new hybrid-mode architecture with a focus on industrial IoT and edge device use cases, delivering flexibility in resource sharing and new levels of real-time and functional safety for demanding workloads in both the automotive and industrial segments.

“The ACRN project is moving fast to address the increasingly complex requirements for IoT devices, networks and environments,” said Mike Dolan, senior vice president and general manager of projects at the Linux Foundation. “This speed and agility in development can only be achieved through collaboration and we’re happy to be able to support this important work.”

Eddie Dong, senior Principal Engineer, architect, and maintainer of Project ACRN said, “The rapid evolution and development from version 1.0 to 2.0 in a year demonstrates the momentum of this project and the demand for a flexible, real-time, safety-critical, open source hypervisor for industrial players that are architecting mission-critical technologies.”

ACRN version 2.0
ACRN 2.0 uses a hybrid-mode architecture to support real-time industrial IoT workloads and edge devices and simultaneously supports both traditional resource sharing among Virtual Machines (VMs) and complete VM resource partitioning required for functional safety. Workload management and orchestration are also enabled now with ACRN, allowing open source orchestrators such as OpenStack to manage ACRN VMs. ACRN supports secure container runtimes such as Kata Containers orchestrated via Docker or Kubernetes.

ACRN 2.0 main features include:

  • ACRN architecture upgrade to support hybrid mode
  • New hardware platform support
  • Pre-launched Safety VM support
  • Post-launched VM support via OVMF
  • Post-launched Real-time VM support
  • Real-time VM performance optimizations
  • CPU sharing support
  • Large selection of OSes for user VMs
  • GRUB bootloader
  • SR-IOV support
  • Both passthrough and shared Graphics support
  • Shared memory based inter-VM communication
  • Configuration tools support
  • Kata Containers Support
  • VM orchestration
  • Improved Documentation

Rina Raman, Vice President and General Manager of the Embedded Acceleration Division at Intel Corporation said, “The fourth industrial revolution, characterized by a fusion of disruptive technologies, requires agility and the ability to consolidate heterogeneous workloads, some of which carry very strict requirements of Functional Safety certification or Real-Time behavior. With its 2.0 release, Project ACRN is now offering an open source hypervisor that makes such workload consolidation possible.”

Thomas Berndorfer, CTO, TTTech Industrial said, “ACRN 2.0 prioritizes the three key requirements for hypervisors today in the Industrial IoT and edge environments: functional safety, real-time, and flexibility for resource sharing among virtual machines. This set of features is uniquely found in ACRN. Contributing actively to the project allows us to shape the future of this critical and rapidly developing technology. ACRN delivers a flexible, real-time, open source hypervisor for industries that have the world’s most demanding mission-critical requirements.”

You can find details about these features and more in the ACRN 2.0 release notes: https://projectacrn.github.io/latest/release_notes/release_notes_2.0.html

ACRN Functional Safety Certification – Safety Concept Approval
ACRN has successfully received concept approval from TÜV SÜD Rail GmbH for its functional safety concept, design and management process in place. The concept approval letter claims that “ACRN Hypervisor is able to fulfill the requirements in accordance with SIL 3 of the IEC 61508 standard.” TÜV SÜD is a trusted partner of choice for safety, security, and sustainability solutions. IEC 61508 is considered as the “Golden Standard” in the functional safety industry. ACRN is on track to receive the final functional safety certification by the end of 2020.

About the ACRN Project
ACRN is a flexible, lightweight reference hypervisor that is built with real-time and safety-criticality in mind. It is optimized to streamline embedded development through an open source platform. ACRN Project members include ADLINK, Aptiv, Intel Corporation, LGE, and Neusoft Corporation. To learn more about the project, visit projectacrn.org.

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit  linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

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503-867-2304

The TARS Foundation: The Formation of a Microservices Ecosystem

Introduction

During the 1960s and 1970’s, software developers typically used monolithic architectures on mainframes and minicomputers for software development, and no single application was able to satisfy the needs of most end-users. Vertical industries used software with a smaller code footprint with simpler interfaces to other applications, and scalability was not a priority at the time.

With the rise and development of the Internet, developers gradually separated the service layer from these monolithic architectures, followed by RPC and then Client/Server.

But existing architectures were unable to keep up with the needs of larger enterprises and exploding data traffic. Beginning in the middle of the 1990s, distributed architectures began to rise in popularity, with service-oriented architectures (known as SOA) becoming increasingly dominant.

In the mid-2000s, microservices began to appear, and a set of popular frameworks based on microservice architectures were developed, with TARS appearing in 2008. After being used at scale and enhanced for 10 years, TARS became a Linux Foundation project in 2018.

Interest in microservices has grown exponentially, as demonstrated by search trends on Google

Figure 1.  Interest in microservices has grown exponentially, as demonstrated by search trends on Google.

Introducing the TARS Foundation

Today, on March 10th, 2020, The Linux Foundation is excited to announce that the TARS project has transitioned into the TARS Foundation. The TARS Foundation is an open source microservice foundation to support the rapid growth of contributions and membership for a community focused on building an open microservices platform.

A Neutral Home for Open Source Microservices Projects

The TARS Foundation is a nonprofit foundation that focuses on open source technology that helps businesses embrace microservices architecture as they innovate into new areas and scale their applications.

It will continue to support the TARS project by growing the community that has been operating under the Linux Foundation since 2018. The Linux Foundation offers a neutral home for infrastructure, open governance, and community engagement support, aiding open source microservices projects to empower any industry to turn ideas into applications at scale quickly.

The TARS Foundation is working on addressing the problems that may occur in using microservices, including reducing the difficulties of development and service governance. It seeks to solve multi-programming language interoperability, data transfer issues, consistency of data storage, and ensuring high performance while supporting massive requests.

The TARS Foundation wishes to accommodate a variety of bottom-up content to build a better microservice ecosystem. It will include but will not be limited to, infrastructure, storage, development framework, service governance, DevOps, and applications based on any programming languages.

It Begins With a Mature Microservice Framework

The modern enterprise is in need of a better microservices platform for their modern applications to support development through DevOps best practices, comprehensive service governance, high-performance data transfer, storage scalability with massive data requests, and built-in cross-language interoperability (e.g., Golang, Java, C++, PHP, Node.js).

In support of these growing requirements, the TARS project provides a mature, high-performance RPC framework that supports multiple programming languages developed by Tencent (0700.HK). Since the initial open source contribution by Tencent, many other organizations have made significant contributions to extending the platform’s features and value.

The TARS Project Microservice Ecosystem

Figure 2. The TARS Project Microservice Ecosystem.

TARS can quickly build systems and automatically generate code, taking into account ease of use and high performance. At the same time, TARS supports multiple programming languages, including C++, Golang, Java, Node.js, PHP, and Python. TARS can help developers and enterprises to quickly build their own stable and reliable distributed applications in a microservices manner, in order to focus on business logic to effectively improve operational efficiency.

The advantages of multi-language support, agile research and development, high availability, and efficient operation make TARS an enterprise-grade product out of the box. TARS has been used and refined in Tencent for the past ten years and has been widely used in Tencent’s QQ and WeChat social network, financial services, edge computing, automotive, video, online games, maps, application market and security, and other hundreds of core businesses. The scale of microservices has reached over one million nodes, perfecting the practice of the industry-standard DevOps philosophy and Tencent’s mass service approach.

Why Should Projects Choose The TARS Foundation?

Joining the TARS Foundation will provide member organizations and projects with the following benefits:

Community Engagement
  • The TARS Foundation will host a constellation of open source projects. Members of the TARS Foundation will leverage many programs to engage with project ecosystems and share their ideas and use cases.
Thought Leadership
  • Members of the TARS Foundation will be able to network and help shape the evolving microservices ecosystem.
Marketing Amplification and Brand Awareness
  • Members can broaden their project’s reach and awareness in the community with TARS Foundation marketing programs.

As the TARS Foundation has been created to develop and foster the open microservices ecosystem, it will establish different functional mailing lists to support its user communities.

The TARS Foundation will also establish a series of mechanisms for the incubation and development of new projects. After a project has agreed to join the Foundation, the appropriate incubation and maturation route will be tailored according to the project circumstances.

After meeting all incubation requirements, the TARS Foundation will announce the project’s graduation. In addition to providing a technical oversight committee and a user community, the governing board will look after these projects by reviewing each project’s unique situation, providing strategic decisions, and assisting with their overall development.

Partner Commitments to the TARS Foundation

The TARS Foundation aims to empower any industry vertical to realize their ideas with their implementation of microservices. To date, TARS has worked with many industries, including fintech, e-sports, edge computing, online video, e-commerce, and education, among others.

As a result of over a decade of industry leadership in developing open microservices projects, many companies from different industries, such as Arm, Tencent, AfterShip, Ampere, API7, Kong, and Zenlayer, have committed to and have joined The TARS Foundation as members and partners.

Tencent

TARS has been developed, hardened, and enhanced within Tencent for more than ten years. It is widely used in Tencent’s QQ and WeChat social, video, e-Sports, maps, application market and security, and other hundreds of core businesses. The scale of microservices has reached over one million nodes, perfecting the practice of the industry-standard DevOps philosophy and Tencent’s mass service approach.

Arm

Arm is the world’s leading semiconductor intellectual property (IP) provider. Arm has been working with Tencent over the last year to undertake a complete port of TARS microservices to the Arm architecture. That porting effort is now complete and is available through the Akraino Blueprint ecosystem. The first two Arm deployments within Tencent are AR/VR and autonomous vehicle use cases for internal Tencent use.

AfterShip

AfterShip was established in 2012 with its headquarters located in Hong Kong. The company provides SaaS solutions to over 10,000 eCommerce businesses in the world. AfterShip’s solutions include shipment tracking, returns management, sales, and marketing.  AfterShip is a market leader in shipment tracking solutions.

“Our company has been adopting microservices for years, and we believe the TARS Foundation will help us excel in using microservices in the future.”

Ampere

Ampere focuses on cloud-native hardware. As such, it needs to ensure that any software used on that hardware runs exceedingly well to meet the demands of their customers’ expectations.

“Microservices have become very popular for several years, so we think cooperation with the TARS Foundation and focusing on microservices will allow us to achieve our vision.”

API7

API7 is an open source software startup company delivering a cloud-native microservices API gateway that aims to deliver the ultimate performance, security, open source, and scalable platform for all APIs and microservices. Compared with traditional API gateways, it has dynamic routing and plug-in hot loading, which is especially suitable for API management under a microservices-based system.

Kong

Kong is the world’s most popular open source microservice API gateway. Kong is used to secure, manage, and orchestrate microservice APIs.

“We look forward to collaborating with the TARS Foundation members to drive microservices adoption and innovation across businesses of all industries.”

Zenlayer

Zenlayer is an edge cloud services provider that enables businesses to improve digital user experiences quickly and globally, particularly in emerging markets.

“Integration of microservices with edge computing is now widespread. We look forward to doing more research on that and with the TARS Foundation.”

Conclusion

The TARS Foundation can help make the microservices ecosystem more effective, building a more aligned community of contributors and supporters. As more technology-first companies deploy microservices in production, we expect the trend to extend to traditional industries that are transforming. We hope that more people and companies will participate in the TARS Foundation and welcome everyone to contribute to a better and more open microservice ecosystem.

“The TARS Foundation will accelerate innovation for the microservices ecosystem through an open governance model that allows for rapid and high-quality contributions and collaboration. The Linux Foundation is very happy to support this work and enable its growth.” — Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of the Linux Foundation

 

  • Akraino R2 delivers new levels of flexibility for scale, efficiency, and high availability while accelerating deployment of edge application
  • Augments edge stacks delivered in R1 including Network Cloud, IoT Edge, Enterprise Edge, and Telecom Edge with new and enhanced tested and validated deployment-ready blueprints

SAN FRANCISCO  January 16, 2020LF Edge, an umbrella organization within the Linux Foundation that aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for edge computing independent of hardware, silicon, cloud, or operating system, today announced the availability of Akraino Edge Stack Release 2 (“Akraino R2”).  Akraino’s second release furthers the power of intelligent edge with new and enhanced deployable, self-certified blueprints for a diverse set of edge use cases.

Launched in 2018, and now a Stage 3 (or “Impact” stage) project under the LF Edge umbrella, Akraino Edge Stack is creating an open source software stack that supports a high-availability cloud stack optimized for edge computing systems and applications. Designed to improve the state of edge cloud infrastructure for enterprise edge, over-the-top (OTT) edge, and carrier edge networks, it offers users new levels of flexibility to scale edge cloud services quickly, to maximize the applications and functions supported at the edge, and to help ensure the reliability of systems that must be up at all times.

“The Akraino community has grown rapidly in the past year, and now includes contributions from 70 percent of LF Edge Premium member companies and countless other ecosystem partners beginning to deploy the blueprints across the globe,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Automation, Edge and IoT, the Linux Foundation. “With R2, strong community collaboration brings even more blueprints to the ecosystem that support current and future technology at the open source edge.”

About Akraino R2
Akraino Release 2 delivers the next iteration of open source edge cloud innovation for new levels of flexibility that scale 5G, industrial IoT, telco, and enterprise edge cloud services quickly, by delivering community-vetted edge cloud blueprints to deploy edge services. The blueprints address interoperability, packaging, and testing under open standards, which reduces users’ overall deployment costs and integration time. 

Akraino R2 includes 6 blueprint families and 14 blueprints, all tested and validated on real hardware labs supported by users and community members. This release enhances the edge stacks delivered in R1 for cross-disciplinary edge use cases as well as new edge stacks to support connected vehicles, AR/VR, NFV, Telco Access, integration with SDN solutions and project promotions to maturity, with rigorous community standards. 

The 14 “ready and proven” blueprints, include both updates to existing R1 blueprints, and the introduction of five new blueprints:

  • Connected Vehicle: This blueprint establishes an open source MEC platform to enable use cases such as accuracy of location, smarter navigation with real-time traffic updates, driver safety improvements, and traffic rule alerts. 
  • IEC type 4: AR/VR-oriented Edge Stack: Focused on focused on AR/ VR applications running on the edge, the blueprint builds the AR/VR infrastructure and introduces  a virtual classroom application, which improves online education experiences for teachers and students through a virtual classroom simulation. 
  • Integrated Cloud Native NFV/Application Stack (ICN): ICN addresses the overall challenges of edge deployments in a single deployment model that enables Edge Providers for Zero Touch Provisioning support in multi-cloud, multi-edge and multi-party orchestration. It integrates Kubernetes and ONAP4K8s for container run times and service orchestration and supports bare metal and virtual deployments. 
  • Network Cloud and Tungsten Fabric: This blueprint implements the Network Cloud with LF Networking’s Tungsten Fabric as an SDN Controller supporting cloud native integration for Kubernetes as well as the Neutron plugin for OpenStack, allowing operators to leverage Tungsten Fabric as a deployment tool and control infrastructure. 
  • SDN-Enabled Broadband Access (SEBA): Part of the the Telco Appliance blueprint family, SEBA provides an appliance tuned to support the SDN-enabled Broadband Access (SEBA) platform. The blueprint utilizes a reusable set of modules introduced by the Radio Edge Cloud (REC), introduced in Akraino R1.

More information on Akraino R2, including links to documentation, can be found here. For details on how to get involved with LF Edge and its projects, visit https://www.lfedge.org/

Looking Ahead
The community is already planning R3, which will include more new blueprints such as Edge AI/ML, 5G MEC/Slice, Time Critical Edge, and Micro-MEC and more, as well as enhancements to existing blueprints and tools for automated blueprint validations

Don’t miss the Open Networking and Edge Summit (ONES) North America, April 20-21 in Los Angeles, where Akraino and other LF Edge communities will be onsite to share the latest open source edge developments. 

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

To accelerate digital transformation, organizations in every industry are modernizing their on-premises technologies by adopting cloud-native applications. According to the International Data Corporation (IDC), global spend on cloud computing will grow from $147 billion in 2019 to $418 billion by 2024. Almost half of that investment will be tied to technologies that help companies deliver personalized customer experiences.

One major challenge of this shift to cloud computing is that applications are typically created with their own data models, forcing developers to build, test, and manage custom code that’s necessary to map and translate data across different systems. The process is inefficient, delays innovation, and ultimately can result in a broken customer experience.

Announcing the Cloud Information Model

It is in the spirit of removing these barriers to innovation that Amazon Web Services, Genesys, and Salesforce have come together with the Linux Foundation’s Joint Development Foundation (JDF) to form the Cloud Information Model (CIM), an open-source data model that standardizes data interoperability across cloud applications.  The publication of CIM is enabled by MuleSoft’s open source modeling technology, providing multiple file formats to make it easy to adopt CIM with varying applications.  By easily integrating data in the cloud, developers can build new products that deliver connected and personalized customer experiences.

“Bringing the Cloud Information Model under JDF will offer a neutral home for the open-source community,” Jim Zemlin, Executive Director at The Linux Foundation. “This allows for anyone across the community to collaborate and provide contributions under a central governance model. It paves the way for full community-wide engagement in data interoperability efforts and standards development, while rapidly increasing adoption rate of the community.”

How the Cloud Information Model Works

The CIM reduces the complexities of integrating data across cloud applications by providing standardized data interoperability guidelines to connect point-of-sale systems, digital marketing platforms, contact centers, CRM systems and more. Developers no longer need to spend months creating custom code. Instead, they can adopt and extend the CIM within days so that they can create data lakes, generate analytics, train machine learning models, build a single view of the customer and more.

CIM Compatible Applications

The founding members already offer products and technologies for companies to use with the CIM.  AWS Lake Formation helps customers move, store, catalog and clean data from different sources to quickly set up a secure data lake. Amazon Redshift powers mission critical data warehouses for business intelligence, predictive analytics and real-time streaming analytics. Customers can leverage the JSON or SQL scripts to create CIM-compatible schemas for their AWS data lakes and data warehouses.

Salesforce’s Customer 360 is a set of platform services powered by CIM. Customer 360 provides customers with a single source of truth by providing instant access to consistent, reconciled customer data across Salesforce apps. MuleSoft, the provider of the leading integration and API platform, now natively supports CIM to enable the discovery of CIM data types, allowing users to easily create CIM-compatible APIs and integrations. CIM is available today in MuleSoft’s Anypoint Exchange, its public marketplace of connectors, templates and APIs.

Using Genesys Cloud and Genesys AI, businesses can seamlessly interact with their customers across all channels, including voice, chat, email, text and social. By combining engagement data from Genesys with data from CIM-compatible sources, businesses gain an even more complete perspective of their customers and employees in real-time, resulting in deeper levels of personalization.

How to Contribute to CIM

Anyone is invited to contribute to the CIM–including developers, technology vendors and brands. To learn more and get started, visit www.cloudinformationmodel.org. If you would like information on joining the project, please reach out to membership@cloudinformationmodel.org.

 

 

To accelerate digital transformation, organizations in every industry are modernizing their on-premises technologies by adopting cloud-native applications. According to the International Data Corporation (IDC), global spend on cloud computing will grow from $147 billion in 2019 to $418 billion by 2024. Almost half of that investment will be tied to technologies that help companies deliver personalized customer experiences.

One major challenge of this shift to cloud computing is that applications are typically created with their own data models, forcing developers to build, test, and manage custom code that’s necessary to map and translate data across different systems. The process is inefficient, delays innovation, and ultimately can result in a broken customer experience.

Announcing the Cloud Information Model

It is in the spirit of removing these barriers to innovation that Amazon Web Services, Genesys, and Salesforce have come together with the Linux Foundation’s Joint Development Foundation (JDF) to form the Cloud Information Model (CIM), an open-source data model that standardizes data interoperability across cloud applications.  The publication of CIM is enabled by MuleSoft’s open source modeling technology, providing multiple file formats to make it easy to adopt CIM with varying applications.  By easily integrating data in the cloud, developers can build new products that deliver connected and personalized customer experiences.

“Bringing the Cloud Information Model under JDF will offer a neutral home for the open-source community,” Jim Zemlin, Executive Director at The Linux Foundation. “This allows for anyone across the community to collaborate and provide contributions under a central governance model. It paves the way for full community-wide engagement in data interoperability efforts and standards development, while rapidly increasing adoption rate of the community.”

How the Cloud Information Model Works

The CIM reduces the complexities of integrating data across cloud applications by providing standardized data interoperability guidelines to connect point-of-sale systems, digital marketing platforms, contact centers, CRM systems and more. Developers no longer need to spend months creating custom code. Instead, they can adopt and extend the CIM within days so that they can create data lakes, generate analytics, train machine learning models, build a single view of the customer and more.

CIM Compatible Applications

The founding members already offer products and technologies for companies to use with the CIM.  AWS Lake Formation helps customers move, store, catalog and clean data from different sources to quickly set up a secure data lake. Amazon Redshift powers mission critical data warehouses for business intelligence, predictive analytics and real-time streaming analytics. Customers can leverage the JSON or SQL scripts to create CIM-compatible schemas for their AWS data lakes and data warehouses.

Salesforce’s Customer 360 is a set of platform services powered by CIM. Customer 360 provides customers with a single source of truth by providing instant access to consistent, reconciled customer data across Salesforce apps. MuleSoft, the provider of the leading integration and API platform, now natively supports CIM to enable the discovery of CIM data types, allowing users to easily create CIM-compatible APIs and integrations. CIM is available today in MuleSoft’s Anypoint Exchange, its public marketplace of connectors, templates and APIs.

Using Genesys Cloud and Genesys AI, businesses can seamlessly interact with their customers across all channels, including voice, chat, email, text and social. By combining engagement data from Genesys with data from CIM-compatible sources, businesses gain an even more complete perspective of their customers and employees in real-time, resulting in deeper levels of personalization.

How to Contribute to CIM

Anyone is invited to contribute to the CIM–including developers, technology vendors and brands. To learn more and get started, visit www.cloudinformationmodel.org. If you would like information on joining the project, please reach out to membership@cloudinformationmodel.org.

 

 

SHANGHAI – June 24, 2019 – KubeCon + CloudNativeCon, China – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, is joining LF Asia LLC, our local partner, to announce the availability of Certified Kubernetes Administrator (CKA) exam and corresponding Kubernetes Fundamentals course as in-country, instructor-led programs taught in Chinese. 

According to a Cloud Native Computing Foundation survey, 44 percent of Mandarin respondents are deploying Kubernetes. There is great demand in China and the overall Asia/Pac region for training courses that will help developers accelerate their work with Kubernetes and associated technologies.

Since launching in 2017, the CKA exam has been taken by nearly 10,000 professionals around the world. Now it will be easier for Chinese users to take advantage of this offering with in-person instructors and in their local language. To register for the exam and courses, please visit: http://training.linuxfoundation.cn/

“The Kubernetes administrator courses and certified exam are among the most popular training courses we offer,” said Clyde Seepersad, general manager, Linux Foundation training. “We’re now able to make the courses and exam available in Chinese with in-country exam delivery and instructors, which we hope will increase access and opportunity to learn and apply one of today’s most relevant and pervasive open source technologies.”

The CKA exam allows users to demonstrate their competence in a hands-on, command-line environment. The purpose of the Certified Kubernetes Administrator (CKA) program is to provide assurance that CKAs have the skills, knowledge, and competency to perform the responsibilities of Kubernetes administrators. It is an online, proctored, performance-based test that requires solving multiple issues from a command line.

With the majority of container-related job listings asking for proficiency in Kubernetes as an orchestration platform, the CKA program expands the pool of Kubernetes experts in the market, thereby enabling continued growth across the broad set of organizations using the technology.

For those interested in taking the Certified Kubernetes Administrator Exam, you can learn more at: http://training.linuxfoundation.cn/

Additional Resources

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

Open source logging tool has been adopted by over 5,000 community users

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. – April 11, 2019 – The Cloud Native Computing Foundation® (CNCF®), which sustains open source technologies like Kubernetes® and Prometheus™, today announced that Fluentd is its sixth project to graduate, following Kubernetes, Prometheus, Envoy, CoreDNS and containerd. To move from the maturity level of incubation to graduation, projects must demonstrate thriving adoption, a documented, structured governance process, and a strong commitment to community sustainability and inclusivity.

“In the two and a half years since Fluentd became a part of CNCF, we’ve seen it grow beyond a project to a full ecosystem of integrations and third party components,” said Chris Aniszczyk, CTO/COO of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. “With an active community of contributors and users, the CNCF TOC felt Fluentd was ready for graduation and we look forward to cultivating their community.”

Fluentd was created in 2011 by Sadayuki “Sada” Furuhashi, co-founder of Treasure Data, Inc., as an open source data collector for building a Unified Logging Layer, which unifies the data collection and consumption for a better use and understanding of data. In November 2016, Fluentd was accepted as CNCF’s sixth hosted project after Kubernetes, Prometheus and OpenTracing.

Fluentd solves logging problems at scale, not just for standalone applications, but it streamlines components of distributed architectures, making it an integral tool for any cloud native organization” said Masahiro Nakagawa, Principal Engineer at Arm®Treasure Data and core Fluentd Maintainer. “We’re thrilled to have had the opportunity to collaborate with the CNCF community and to grow our user base, and are honored to graduate.”

With more than 900 plugins connecting to its many data sources and data outputs; including Docker, Google Cloud, Kubernetes, etc., Fluentd was the 2016 Bossie Awards winner for the best open source datacenter and cloud software. More than 5,000 data-driven community users rely on Fluentd to differentiate their products and services through a better use and understanding of their log data, including Atlassian, Amazon Web Services, Backplane, Change.org, CyberAgent, DeNa, Drecom, GREE, GungHo, LINE Corp, Nintendo, Microsoft, Slideshare and many others.

“Fluentd has earned its place as the industry standard for log collection and shipping, and I am excited to see it as a graduated CNCF project,” said Gabe Monroy, Lead Program Manager for Containers, Microsoft Azure. “At Microsoft, we are proud to use Fluentd to power our cloud native logging subsystems and we look forward to working with the growing the open source community around Fluentd.”

Fluentd now has 4 active maintainers, over 160 contributors and more than 4,400 commits. It also has 189 official releases, more than 48 Million Docker Hub pulls, 941 plugins available made by the community and over 7500 Github Stars.

“As one of the longest standing incubating projects within CNCF, Fluentd has demonstrated impressive growth, adoption, and numerous integrations within the broader community,” said Brian Grant, Principal Software Engineer at Google and CNCF TOC representative. “We have no doubt that Fluentd is ready to move to this next stage, and are excited to see what the project continues to accomplish.”

To officially graduate from incubating status, the project also adopted the CNCF Code of Conduct, earned a Core Infrastructure Initiative Best Practices Badge. Completed in August 2017, the CII badge shows an ongoing commitment to code quality and security best practices.  

Fluentd Background

Fluentd collects events from various data sources and writes them to files, RDBMS, NoSQL, IaaS, SaaS, Hadoop and so on. Fluentd helps you unify your logging infrastructure. All components are available under the Apache 2 License, and are overseen by a self-selected team of active contributors to the project. For downloads, documentation, and how to get involved, visit https://github.com/fluent/fluentd, https://www.fluentd.org/ and https://twitter.com/fluentd.

The Linux Foundation is developing an elearning course titled Cloud Native Logging with Fluentd, which will be available in May 2019. This self-paced, hands-on course is designed to introduce individuals with a technical background to the Fluentd log forwarding and aggregation tool for use in Cloud Native Logging and provide them with the skills necessary to deploy Fluentd in a wide range of production settings.

Additional Resources

About Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Cloud native computing uses an open source software stack to deploy applications as microservices, packaging each part into its own container, and dynamically orchestrating those containers to optimize resource utilization. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts critical components of cloud native software stacks, including Kubernetes and Prometheus. CNCF serves as the neutral home for collaboration and brings together the industry’s top developers, end users and vendors – including the world’s largest public cloud and enterprise software companies as well as dozens of innovative startups. CNCF is part of The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization. For more information about CNCF, please visit www.cncf.io.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact

Natasha Woods

The Linux Foundation

nwoods@linuxfoundation.org

CNCF hosts the biggest open source and cloud native event in China featuring talks from Alibaba, Baidu, Huawei, Tencent and Yahoo! Japan, Adds Open Source Summit from the Linux Foundation

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. – April 10, 2019 – T​he Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF®), which sustains and integrates open source technologies like Kubernetes® and Prometheus™, announced today speakers for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon + Open Source Summit China 2019 on June 24-26, 2019, in Shanghai.

KubeCon + CloudNativeCon will feature content spanning networking, AI/ML/DL, blockchain, edge computing, and open source best practices with the addition of Open Source Summit, formerly known as the LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China (LC3). See KubeCon + CloudNativeCon + Open Source Summit China 2019 Program Announcedfor more information on speakers, tracks and sessions covering these topics.

KubeCon + CloudNativeCon + Open Source Summit features speakers from Ant Financial, GO-JEK, eBay, JD.com and East China Normal University, who will address discuss cloud native implementations with Kubernetes, Prometheus, and more.

“Since our inaugural KubeCon + CloudNativeCon event in China last year, we have seen significant interest and momentum from organizations in the region that are developing and using cloud native and open source technologies,” said Dan Kohn, Executive Director of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. “We are expanding the event and are proud to host the largest open source conference in China to continue driving collaboration across the global open source community.”

A program committee of 75 experts led by conference co-chairs VMware’s Bryan Liles and Lyft’s Vicki Cheung reviewed 618 submissions for the KubeCon + CloudNativeCon tracks to create the show’s diverse content lineup. The agenda features a full slate of technical sessions, deep-dives and case studies touching on all CNCF project and topics including application + development, CI/CD, open source community, customizing + extending Kubernetes, machine learning + data, networking, observability, operations, performance, runtimes, security + identity + policy, serverless, service mesh, storage and more!

“Having the opportunity to review submissions for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon + Open Source Summit China has been a very eye-opening experience seeing first-hand the adoption and interest in open source and cloud native technology in China,” said Liles. “We are seeing massive growth, which has increased from last year’s event. Attendees can look forward to a very diverse and inspiring line-up of maintainers, technology experts and end users who are experiencing first hand the benefits of these technologies.”

Thousands of technologists will gather for three days to hear from the maintainers and end users of CNCF’s hosted projects – including Kubernetes, Prometheus, Envoy, CoreDNS, containerd, OpenTracing, Fluentd, gRPC, rkt, CNI, Jaeger, Notary, TUF, Vitess, Linkerd, NATS, Helm, Rook, Harbor, etcd, Open Policy Agent, and CRI-O – as well as other open source and cloud native technologies.

The community-curated KubeCon + CloudNativeCon + Open Source Summit schedule will feature sessions from the following cloud native open source technologists:

  • “Cloud Native at Alibaba Scale,” from Xiang Li of Alibaba Group and Technical Oversight Committee member of CNCF
  • “Evolving Deep Learning Platform with Knative,” from Ti Zhou of Baidu
  • “Building and Managing Kubernetes with Kubernetes,” from Xin Ma of eBay
  • “Open Source Education in High School: Take CNCF Projects as an Example,” from Wei Wang of East China Normal University
  • “Benchmarking Cloud Native Databases on Kubernetes,” from Iqbal Farabi & Himani Agrawal of GO-JEK
  • “CRDs, No Longer 2nd Class Thing!” from Jing Xu of Google & Xing Yang of Huawei
  • “Kubernetes: The Video Game,” from Grant Shipley of Red Hat
  • “Kubernetes Housekeeping,” from Damini Satya Kammakomati & Mitesh Jain of Salesforce
  • “HDFS CSI Plugin: Speed Up Kubernetes in On-Premises Big Data Cluster,” from Yi Chen & Junping Du of Tencent
  • “Auto Operation of Hundreds of Kubernetes Clusters in Yahoo! Japan,” from Cheng Chen of Yahoo! Japan

View the full conference schedule in Mandarin

View the full conference schedule in English

CNCF is also hosting the following co-located events as part of KubeCon + CloudNativeCon + Open Source Summit, on Monday, June 24 from 8:00 – 16:00.

  • CNCF End User Partner Summit
  • Continuous Delivery Summit hosted by CNCF
  • DPDK China 2019
  • Kubernetes Contributor Summit
  • Open Data Autonomy Mini Summit
  • Open Heterogeneous Computing Framework Introduction hosted by Huawei/由华为承办
  • Service Mesh hosted by CNCF

Thank You Sponsors

KubeCon + CloudNativeCon + Open Source Summit China is made possible with support from Strategic Sponsor: Huawei Cloud; Double Diamond Sponsor: Tencent Cloud, Diamond Sponsor: Intel; Platinum Sponsor: Rancher; and many more Gold, Silver, Start-Up, and Media Sponsors. More information on sponsorships is available.

Registration, Accommodations and Visas

Register by Thursday, May 2 to save on conference passes. Additionally, hotel and flight discounts are available on the Venue/Travel section of the conference website. Please book early, as the discounted rate is based upon availability. For instructions on obtaining a visa to travel to China, please check out the visa request letter section of the conference website.

CNCF Diversity Scholarship

CNCF offering scholarships to members of traditionally underrepresented groups in the technology and/or open source communities. Learn more about the scholarship and eligibility requirements. All applications are due by Monday, April 15, 2019.

Additional Resources

About Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Cloud native computing uses an open source software stack to deploy applications as microservices, packaging each part into its own container, and dynamically orchestrating those containers to optimize resource utilization. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts critical components of cloud native software stacks, including Kubernetes and Prometheus. CNCF serves as the neutral home for collaboration and brings together the industry’s top developers, end users and vendors – including the world’s largest public cloud and enterprise software companies as well as dozens of innovative startups. CNCF is part of The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization. For more information about CNCF, please visit www.cncf.io.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

Media Contact

Natasha Woods

The Linux Foundation

nwoods@linuxfoundation.org