Open source initiative validates the benefits of telcos running ONAP network functions on Kubernetes

BARCELONA, February 25, 2019 – Mobile World Congress – The Cloud Native Computing Foundation® (CNCF®), which sustains open source technologies like Kubernetes® and Prometheus™, today announced, in partnership with LF Networking (LFN), the open source Cloud native Network Function (CNF) Testbed. At Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, CNCF is demoing the same networking code running as Virtual Network Functions (VNFs) on OpenStack and as CNFs on Kubernetes to showcase the performance improvements from avoiding virtualization overhead.

“CNFs are emerging as the network architecture of the future, for many of the same reasons that containers and Kubernetes are becoming the standard platform for enterprise computing,” said Dan Kohn, Executive Director of Cloud Native Computing Foundation. “We’re excited to continue collaborating with LF Networking to provide telcos and their vendors a way to make replicable comparisons between VNFs and CNFs.”

The CNF Testbed enables organizations to reliably test network functions from ONAP or their own networking code as VNFs and CNFs and compare the performance and resiliency between running on Kubernetes and OpenStack, on the same underlying hardware. As telecom architecture evolves from VNFs into CNFs, the benefits include cost savings from improved bin packing, higher development velocity, and resiliency to failures of individual CNFs, machines, and even data centers.

ONAP, as part of LF Networking, provides a comprehensive platform for real-time, policy-driven orchestration and automation of physical and virtual network functions. It was announced last year that ONAP is now a part of the cncf.ci project, which CNCF runs to integrate, test and deploy CNCF and LF projects on K8s running on bare metal. The CNF Testbed uses several open source VNFs from ONAP’s virtual customer premises equipment (vCPE) use case, while also repackaging the code as containers to be CNFs.

“It’s great to see the collaborative work of ONAP and Kubernetes, two of the fastest-growing Linux Foundation projects, as networking and cloud platforms enabling next-generation architectures,” said Arpit Joshipura, General Manager, Networking, Edge, and IoT, The Linux Foundation. “We’re excited to assist the CNF Testbed in demonstrating a path for the industry to move from VNFs to CNFs.”

The CNF Testbed leverages the Community Infrastructure Lab which makes use of credits generously provided by bare-metal hosting company Packet. The Testbed continues the focus on continuous integration (CI) and replicability which have been hallmarks of the development of Kubernetes. The Kubernetes project runs over 10,000 CI jobs each weekday, which is made possible via the $9 million in Google Cloud Platform credits donated from Google to CNCF last year. Rather than needing to trust the initial results of the CNF Testbed, anyone can replicate the results for themselves with just a copy of the open source CNF Testbed repository and an API key for accessing Packet.

Organizations interested in learning more about CNFs can do so at the twice-a-month Birds of a Feather (BoF) meeting. Details are in the CNF Testbed repo.

Additional CNCF Resources

About Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Cloud native computing uses an open source software stack to deploy applications as microservices, packaging each part into its own container, and dynamically orchestrating those containers to optimize resource utilization. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts critical components of cloud native software stacks, including Kubernetes and Prometheus. CNCF serves as the neutral home for collaboration and brings together the industry’s top developers, end users and vendors – including the world’s largest public cloud and enterprise software companies as well as dozens of innovative startups. CNCF is part of The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization. For more information about CNCF, please visit www.cncf.io.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact

Natasha Woods

The Linux Foundation

nwoods@linuxfoundation.org

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SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 21, 2019 — The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, will be onsite at Mobile World Congress 2019, February 25-28, in Barcelona, Spain.  

Three Linux Foundation projects — the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), Hyperledger, and LF Networking (LFN) — will join together in booth 5J9 to showcase the intersection of blockchain, cloud native, and networking technologies. Project executives Brian Behlendorf, executive director, Hyperledger; Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Orchestration & Edge/IoT; and Dan Kohn, executive director, CNCF, will join other industry leaders for onsite discussions focused on the impact of open source within emerging technologies such as 5G, cloud native network functions, blockchain in the telecom industry, and more.

A full list of activities is included below:

Panel Sessions

  • “How will Open Source Play a Role in the Evolving 5G Ecosystem?” Tuesday Feb. 26, 10:30 -11:30 am, InterDigital booth (Hall 7) 7C61. Panelists include:
    • Abhimanyu Gosain,  Professor and Power Project Officer, Strategic Member OSA,  North Eastern University
    • Chih-Lin I,  China Mobile Chief Scientist, Wireless Technologies, China Mobile Research Institute
    • Arpit Joshipura, General Manager,  Networking, Orchestration & Edge/IO, The Linux Foundation
    • Raymond Knopp,  President, OpenAirInterface Software Alliance
    • Fred Schreider, Senior Director, InterDigital Communication
  • “Building the 5G Network with Cloud Native Applications” — Wednesday, Feb. 27, 14:00 – 15:00. The Executive Panel will be distributed on the CommTechBrief  and NMG Media Platforms. Panelists include:
    • Andrew Coward, CEO, Lumina Networks
    • Arpit Joshipura, General Manager, Networking, Orchestration &  Edge/IoT – The Linux Foundation
    • Dan Kohn, Executive Director, CNCF
    • Martin Taylor, CTO, Metaswitch
  • AI, Machine Learning and Your Access Networks— Thursday, Feb. 28, 11:15 – 12:15, Connectivity Suite, (Hall 4) Auditorium 4. Panelists include:
    • Arpit Joshipura, General Manager, Networking, Orchestration &  Edge/IoT – The Linux Foundation
    • Yousef Khalidi, CVP of the Azure Networking team, Microsoft
    • Oren Marmur, Head of NFV, Amdocs

Hyperledger Meetup

Mobile World Congress special edition with Brian Behlendorf, Executive Director of Hyperledger and Marta Piekarska Director of Hyperledger Ecosystem.

Brian Behlendorf, recognized by the New York Times as one of the Top 10 Most Influential People in Blockchain, will speak about what Hyperledger has become since its launch in December 2015, and the road ahead for 2019. There will be a Q&A session where Brian will answer all your technical and not technical questions. During the meetup, Vipin Rathi, Hyperledger ambassador, will present the new Telecom special interest group.

RSVP here: https://www.meetup.com/Hyperledger-Barcelona/events/258090116/

Launch: Hyperledger’s Telecom Special Interest Group (SIG)

Hyperledger will announce the launch of its Telecom Special Interest Group, which is focused on technical and business-level conversations about appropriate use cases for blockchain technology in the Telecom industry. The activities of the Telecom-SIG include:

  • Identifying related proofs of concepts, current pilot, use cases and functional architecture;
  • Working towards building Telecom Blockchain consortium;
  • Sharing stories of successes, failures, opportunities and challenges;
  • Identifying conferences or other opportunities to connect face to face, as well as submit talks or present as a group at an event.

More information on the SIG and how to get involved can be found here: https://wiki.hyperledger.org/TCSIG

Please visit the official listing at https://www.mwcbarcelona.com/exhibitor/the-linux-foundation/.

Linux Foundation executives will be available for briefings with members of the press during the event; for booking information, please contact pr@linuxfoundation.org.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

Leading global service provider accelerates adoption of cloud computing in big data and AI markets

SAN FRANCISCO – January 31, 2019 – The Cloud Native Computing Foundation® (CNCF®), which sustains and integrates open source technologies like Kubernetes® and Prometheus™, today announced that Inspur has increased its participation to the Gold level.

A leading Chinese service provider for cloud computing and big data, Inspur’s cloud division focuses on providing cloud services to enterprises and government organizations with applications, big data, and container-based IoT services. According to a recent report from IDC, the worldwide server space – in which Inspur is third largest in revenue – jumped 37.7 percent year-over-year in Q3 2018, primarily from large cloud service providers as well as updates within enterprise data centers to handle such emerging workloads as big data analytics and artificial intelligence (AI).

“By enhancing our focus on cloud, data and AI driven applications, we’re working to create more dynamic platforms based on ecosystems between customers, businesses and governments, where data can be shared to benefit all,” said Max Zhang, vice president of Inspur. “Our increased engagement with CNCF will accelerate our work with the global community to further collaboration around data, and work with developers for rapid innovation”

Inspur provides complete AI solutions, which account for over 50 percent of AI market share in China, and power 80 percent of AI supercomputers by fellow CNCF members Alibaba, Baidu, and Tencent. As a member of Hyperledger, the company works to advance blockchain technologies, and launched the first blockchain to be used for city governance in China. Inspur is also a Silver member of The Linux Foundation. The company promotes collaboration in open computing as a Platinum member of both the Open Compute Project and OpenPOWER Foundation and as an early major participant in the Open19 Foundation.

“Leveraging learnings from its roots in data center hardware, Inspur has made impressive progress with its commitment to open cloud development – driving innovations throughout the fast-growing AI and big data spaces,” said Dan Kohn, executive director of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. “With the company’s focus on boosting open collaboration, we look forward to its increased membership and participation in CNCF.”

The company originally joined CNCF as a Silver member in March of 2018. In upgrading its membership, Inspur plans to increase its collaboration within the cloud native ecosystem and bring new open source offerings to the market, including projects based on its SDN controller and OVS DPDK, which was presented during last year’s LinuxCon China event and Open vSwitch Conference.

As a newly-minted Gold member, Inspur will join its fellow CNCF members in Barcelona for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU, from May 20-23, and Shanghai for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon China, from June 24-26.

Additional Resources

About Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Cloud native computing uses an open source software stack to deploy applications as microservices, packaging each part into its own container, and dynamically orchestrating those containers to optimize resource utilization. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts critical components of cloud native software stacks, including Kubernetes and Prometheus. CNCF serves as the neutral home for collaboration and brings together the industry’s top developers, end users and vendors – including the world’s largest public cloud and enterprise software companies as well as dozens of innovative startups. CNCF is part of The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization. For more information about CNCF, please visit www.cncf.io.

About Inspur

Inspur is a leading global data center and cloud computing solutions provider, ranked among the world’s top 3 server vendors according to Gartner and IDC. Inspur delivers and deploys robust, performance-optimized, purpose-built solutions to major data centers around the globe to address important emerging fields and applications.

# # #

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact

Kristen Evans

The Linux Foundation

PR@CNCF.io


云原生计算基金会(CNCF)热烈欢迎Inspur (浪潮)成为黄金级会员

领先的全球服务提供商加速在大数据和人工智能市场采用云计算

旧金山–2019 年1 月31 日–支持并整合Kubernetes® 和Prometheus™ 等开源技术的云原生计算基金会® (CNCF®) 今日宣布,浪潮升级为金牌会员。

作为中国领先的云计算和大数据服务提供商,浪潮的云部门专注于为企业和政府组织提供应用、大数据和基于容器的物联网服务。据IDC 最近的一份报告,全球服务器空间- 浪潮是第三大收入方- 在2018 年第三季度,同比增长37.7%,主要来自大型云服务提供商以及企业数据中心内部的更新,以应对大数据分析和人工智能( AI )等新兴工作负载。

浪潮副总裁张磊表示:“通过加强对云、数据和AI 驱动应用程序的关注,我们致力于基于生态系统,创建客户、企业和政府之间更加动态的平台,数据共享将惠及所有人。”“我们加强融入CNCF 将加快与全球社区的合作,进一步围绕数据展开协作,并与开发者合作,实现快速创新。”

浪潮提供完整的AI 解决方案,占中国AI 市场份额的50% 以上,并为CNCF 成员阿里巴巴、百度和腾讯提供80% 的AI 超级计算机。作为Hyperledger成员,该公司致力于推进区块链技术,并在中国推出第一个用于城市治理的区块链。浪潮也是Linux 基金会的白银级会员。该公司作为开放计算项目OpenPOWER 基金会的铂金会员和Open19 基金会的主要早期参与者,促进开放计算领域的深度合作。

云原生计算基金会(CNCF)执行董事Dan Kohn 说:“凭借从数据中心硬件中汲取的经验,浪潮集团致力于开放云开发,并取得了令人瞩目的进展—推动了快速增长的AI 和大数据领域的创新。”“随着该公司专注于促进开放协作,我们期待着其升级成员资格和深入参与CNCF。”

 该公司最初于2018 年3 月以白银会员身份加入CNCF。在升级成员资格时,浪潮计划加强其在云原生生态系统中的协作,并向市场推出新的开源产品,包括基于其SDN 控制器和OVS DPDK 的项目,其在去年的LinuxCon 中国活动Open vSwitch 会议上推出.

作为新晋的黄金级会员,浪潮将于5 月20-23 日与CNCF 会员共同参加在巴塞罗纳举办的KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 欧洲大会,并于6月24-26 日,亮相上海的KubeCon + CloudNativeCon 中国大会

其他资源

关于云原生计算基金会(CNCF)

云原生计算使用开源软件栈,将应用程序部署为微服务,将每个部分打包到自有容器中,并动态编排这些容器,以优化资源利用率。云原生计算基金会(CNCF) 托管云原生软件栈的关键组件,包括Kubernetes 和Prometheus。CNCF 是中立的协作之家,聚集了业界顶尖的开发人员、最终用户和供应商——包括世界上规模最大的公共云和企业软件公司以及数十家创新型初创企业。CNCF 隶属于非盈利组织Linux 基金会。有关CNCF 的更多信息,请访问www.cncf.io

关于浪潮

根据Gartner 和IDC 的数据,浪潮是全球领先的数据中心和云计算解决方案提供商,位列全球3 大服务器供应商之列。浪潮集团为全球的主要数据中心提供和部署功能强大且性能优化的个性化解决方案,以满足重要的新兴领域和应用需求。

# # #

Linux 基金会拥有注册商标,并使用商标。有关Linux 基金会的商标列表,请参见我们的商标使用页面:https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage。Linux 是Linus Torvalds 的注册商标。

媒体联系人

Kristen Evans

Linux 基金会

PR@CNCF.io

Fast-growing DNS server that serves as official default DNS for Kubernetes

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., January 24, 2018 – The Cloud Native Computing Foundation® (CNCF®), which sustains open source technologies like Kubernetes® and Prometheus™, today announced that CoreDNS is the first project of 2019 to graduate, following last year’s graduations of Kubernetes, Prometheus, and Envoy. To move from the maturity level of incubation to graduation, projects must demonstrate thriving adoption, diversity, a formal governance process, and a strong commitment to community sustainability and inclusivity.

CoreDNS is a fast, flexible, and modern DNS server that also provides service discovery in cloud native deployments. As it provides a backwards-compatible, but extensible, integration with Kubernetes, the most recent Kubernetes release (1.13) officially recommends CoreDNS as the default DNS for all deployments moving forward. The server can also be used for native cloud integration in hybrid cloud environments with AWS, using AWS Route53 and etcd – with plans to add Google Cloud DNS support soon.

“CoreDNS has been a part of CNCF for nearly two years and has been cultivated by the community to reach graduation and officially serve as the DNS server for Kubernetes,” said Chris Aniszczyk, COO of CNCF. “Also, CoreDNS is a fantastic standalone DNS server that continues to be used in more environments – we’re excited to continue to support the community as it grows.”

The project was created in March 2016 by Miek Gieben, who was then a site reliability engineer at Google. In building CoreDNS, the community took into account the limitations of other DNS servers to create a generic DNS server that could talk to multiple backends – like etcd, Consul and Kubernetes. CoreDNS later joined the Cloud Native Sandbox in 2017, and became an Incubating project in February 2018. Today, the project has over 100 contributors, 16 active maintainers, and many organizations using it in production in and outside of Kubernetes – including Bose, Hellofresh, Skyscanner, SoundCloud, Trainline, and Zalando.

“Since joining CNCF in early 2017, CoreDNS has been able to see fantastic community growth and amazing uses in production,” said Yong Tang, CoreDNS maintainer. “We’re incredibly thankful to CNCF who has helped make CoreDNS a successful project, and look forward to working with CNCF to continue the growth of our community.”

“The CoreDNS project and community have come a long way, resulting in the huge milestone of graduating as a project within CNCF,” said Michael Grosser, CoreDNS maintainer and founder of Okkur Labs. “From a simple DNS server exposing Prometheus metrics, to a full-fledged DNS solution with huge flexibility built-in. Becoming a core component in most Kubernetes clusters, bringing more stability and flexibility to users, gives us confidence in the awesome community supporting CoreDNS.”

“The flexible, plugin-based architecture of CoreDNS has proven to be a powerful design for a DNS server. The ease of integrating with and extending CoreDNS has made it critical to implementing a wide variety of DNS services and use cases from Kubernetes service discovery to policy-based DNS and ad blocking,” said John Belamaric, senior staff software engineer, Google Cloud and CoreDNS senior maintainer. “CNCF’s support for the project has been critical to the success of CoreDNS, and we are excited to graduate and continue growing our diverse community.”

“As a project maintainer, I’ve focused on tuning CoreDNS for its adoption by the Kubernetes community, collaborating on Kubernetes deployments of CoreDNS, and validating the project as the DNS Server for Kubernetes clusters,” said Francois Tur, software manager at Infoblox “Today’s graduation of CoreDNS from CNCF is a great achievement for our project community. This journey started more than two years ago and we’re just getting started.”

To officially graduate from incubating status, the project adopted the CNCF Code of Conduct. The CoreDNS team has also completed 12 releases in the past year, and now has 35 built-in plugins and 15 external, with several developed for the Kubernetes community. It participated in the past two years of Google Summer of Code, in which mentors are paired with student interns to help advance growing cloud native projects.

“At Infoblox Inc., we’re proud to use CoreDNS in our SAAS DNS offering, which we’ve deployed with multiple instances of CoreDNS globally. It’s currently serving production DNS traffic for all Infoblox Cloud customers, including some Fortune 500 companies,” said Naveen Singh, senior software manager at Infoblox. “We appreciate CoreDNS’ plug-in architecture, which offers greater flexibility, increased development speed and fast release cycles for us.”

“Building GitNS.com on a solid foundation with CoreDNS was a great decision. The essential nature of DNS made it paramount to build on top of a performant, reliable, and extensible system,” said Michael Grosser, founder of GitNS. “The project has an incredible community we are more than happy to support. With CoreDNS’ graduation from CNCF, it becomes one of the best DNS platforms to build infrastructure and custom use cases on.”

CoreDNS Background

Additional CNCF Resources

About Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Cloud native computing uses an open source software stack to deploy applications as microservices, packaging each part into its own container, and dynamically orchestrating those containers to optimize resource utilization. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts critical components of cloud native software stacks, including Kubernetes and Prometheus. CNCF serves as the neutral home for collaboration and brings together the industry’s top developers, end users and vendors – including the world’s largest public cloud and enterprise software companies as well as dozens of innovative startups. CNCF is part of The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization. For more information about CNCF, please visit www.cncf.io.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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Cloud Foundry

Multi-platform means enterprises would want a variety of platforms for a variety of application workloads, says Cloud Foundry’s Abby Kearns.

2018 has been an amazing year for Cloud Foundry, with Alibaba joining as a Gold member, and Pivotal going public with its IPO, among some of the highlights. I recently talked with Abby Kearns, Executive Director of Cloud Foundry Foundation, to reflect on these milestones and more.

Kearns has been part of the Cloud Foundry ecosystem for the past five years and, under her leadership, Cloud Foundry has grown and evolved and found its way into half of the Fortune 500 companies, with those numbers increasing daily.

All of the major public cloud vendors want to be part of the ecosystem. “This year, we saw Alibaba join as a Gold member, and Cloud Foundry is now natively available on Alibaba Cloud,” said Kearns.

In 2017, Cloud Foundry embraced Kubernetes, the hottest open source project, and created CFCR (Cloud Foundry Container Runtime). “Kubernetes is a great technology that brings tons of capabilities to containers, which are the fundamental building blocks for a lot of portability for cloud native apps,” Kearns said.

“CFCR, which is Kubernetes on BOSH, allows enterprises to start running containerized workloads alongside Cloud Foundry deployments. … They now have a single plane of operations, which allows them to have a variety of applications,” she explained.

However, Kearns sees that the market is evolving beyond just multi-cloud. “We are entering into a multi-platform world where enterprises are going to be running a variety of technologies and solutions to address the variety of workload needs with their applications,” said Kearns.

When asked what she meant by multi-platform in the context of cloud, Kearns explained, “Multi-platform means that enterprises would want a variety of platforms for a variety of application workloads. There’s never going to be one technology that solves everything. It’s not going to be Cloud Foundry or Kubernetes; it’s going to be a mix. At the end of the day, enterprises are broad and complex. They have evolving needs. They want a mix of technologies that complement each other.”

However, multi-platform brings its own set of challenges. “Technology is the easy part, my big worry is people getting caught up in the hype of something new and then they want to have it. Then they want to have the next shiny thing,” she said.

When you get caught up in that hype cycle, you lose focus on what you need to do. Enterprises need to be aware of this and must ask themselves what do their business need to do? What are the outcomes they expect? How do they leverage technology to achieve that?

“I think taking a step back and asking ourselves what are we really trying to solve,” she said. “I think just for me, sometimes it is — take a breath, pause and think, okay, where, where are we going and why?”

Hear more from Abby Kearns in the video below:

Course will teach students to use Prometheus for better insight into systems and services and define more precise and meaningful alerts

SAN FRANCISCO, November 15, 2018 — The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the availability of a new training course, LFS241 – Monitoring Systems and Services with Prometheus.

Prometheus is an open source monitoring system and time series database that is especially well-suited for monitoring dynamic cloud environments. It contains a powerful query language and data model in addition to integrated alerting and service discovery support. LFS241 is designed for software engineers and systems administrators who want to gain a deeper understanding of using Prometheus as a means to gain better insights into their systems and services.

LFS241 exposes new Prometheus users to many of its major features, best practices and use cases. Students will be able to monitor their systems and services effectively with Prometheus upon completion on this course. This course is approximately 20 to 25 hours and covers the following topics:

  • Prometheus architecture
  • Setting up and using Prometheus
  • Monitoring core system components and services
  • Basic and advanced querying
  • Creating dashboards
  • Instrumenting services and writing third-party integrations
  • Alerting
  • Using Prometheus with Kubernetes
  • Advanced operational aspects

This course contains 55 labs that can be completed locally, on a VM or in the cloud. As LFS241 is a hands on course, participants should have basic experience with Linux/Unix system administration and common shell commands, as well as some development experience in Go and/or Python and working with Kubernetes.

“Adoption of the Prometheus monitoring system is growing rapidly, leading to demand for more talent qualified to work with this technology, which is why we decided now is the time to develop this course,” said Clyde Seepersad, General Manager, Training & Certification, The Linux Foundation. “With content developed by CNCF, which hosts Prometheus, and Julius Volz, one of the founders of the project, there is no better option than LFS241 for learning the ins and outs of this solution.”

Since its release in 2012, Prometheus has been adopted by a multitude of companies and is now a self-contained, independently-maintained open source project. In 2016, Prometheus joined Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) and is the de facto standard for monitoring container-based infrastructure.

The course was authored by Julius Volz, who co-founded the Prometheus monitoring system and lead the project to success at SoundCloud and beyond. He now focuses on growing the Prometheus community, freelances around Prometheus, and started PromCon, the first conference around Prometheus. Before SoundCloud, Julius was a Site Reliability Engineer at Google.

LFS241 joins other training courses from The Linux Foundation and CNCF including LFS258 – Kubernetes Fundamentals and LFD259 – Kubernetes for Developers, and the Certified Kubernetes Administration and Certified Kubernetes Developer certification exams.

This new course is available to start immediately. The $199 course fee provides unlimited access to the course for one year including all content and labs. Interested individuals may enroll here.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

# # #

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page:https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage.

Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

The Xen Project is now one of the most popular open source hypervisors and amasses more than 10 million users, and this October marks our 15th anniversary.

In the 1990s, Xen was a part of a research project to build a public computing infrastructure on the Internet led by Ian Pratt and Keir Fraser at The University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory. The Xen Project is now one of the most popular open source hypervisors and amasses more than 10 million users, and this October marks our 15th anniversary.

From its beginnings, Xen technology focused on building a modular and flexible architecture, a high degree of customizability, and security. This security mindset from the outset led to inclusion of non-core security technologies, which eventually allowed the Xen Project to excel outside of the data center and be a trusted source for security and embedded vendors (ex. Qubes, Bromium, Bitdefender, Star Labs, Zentific, Dornerworks, Bosch, BAE systems), and also a leading hypervisor contender for the automotive space.

As the Xen Project looks to a future of virtualization everywhere, we reflect back on some of our major achievements over the last 15 years. To celebrate, we’ve created an infographic that captures some of our key milestones share it on social.

A few community members also weighed in on some of their favorite Xen Project moments and what’s to come:

“Xen offers best-in-class isolation and separation while preserving nearly bare-metal performance on x86 and ARM platforms. The growing market for a secure hypervisor ensures Xen will continue to grow in multiple markets to meet users demands.”

  • Doug Goldstein, Software Developer V, Hypervisors at Rackspace

“Xen started life at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory, as part of the XenoServers research project to build a public computing infrastructure on the Internet. It’s been fantastic to see the impact of Xen, and the role it’s played at the heart of what we now call Infrastructure as a Service Cloud Computing. It’s been an incredible journey from Xen’s early beginnings in the University, to making our first open source release in 2003, to building a strong community of contributors around the project, and then Xen’s growth beyond server virtualization into end-user systems and now embedded devices. Xen is a great example of the power of open source to enable cooperation and drive technological progress.”

  • Ian Pratt, Founder and President at Bromium, and Xen Project Founder

“From its beginnings as a research project, able to run just a handful of Linux VMs, through being the foundation of many of the world’s largest clouds, to being the open-source hypervisor of choice for many next-generation industrial, automotive and aeronautical applications, Xen Project has shown its adaptability, flexibility and pioneering spirit for 15 years. Today, at Citrix, Xen remains the core of our Citrix Hypervisor platform, powering the secure delivery of applications and data to organizations across the globe. Xen Project Hypervisor allows our customers to run thousands of virtual desktops per server, many of them using Xen’s ground-breaking GPU virtualization capabilities. Happy birthday, Xen!”

  • James Bulpin, Senior Director of Technology at Citrix

“The Xen open source community is a vibrant and diverse platform for collaboration, something which is important to Arm and vital to the ongoing success of our ecosystem. We’ve contributed to the Xen open source hypervisor across a range of markets starting with mobile, moving into the strategic enablement that allowed the deployment of Arm-based cloud servers, and more recently focusing on the embedded space, exploring computing in safety-sensitive environments such as connected vehicles.”

  • Mark Hambleton, Vice President of Open Source Software, Arm

“I – like many others – associate cloud computing with Xen. All my cloud-related projects are tied to companies running large deployments of Xen. These days even my weekend binge-watching needs are satisfied by a Xen instance somewhere. With Xen making its way into cars, rocket launch operations and satellites, it’s safe to say the industry at large recognizes it as a solid foundation for building the future, and I’m excited to be a part of it.”

  • Mihai Dontu, Chief Linux Officer at Bitdefender

“Xen was the first open source hypervisor for the data center, the very foundation of the cloud as we know it. Later, it pioneered virtualization for embedded and IoT, making its way into set-top boxes and smaller ARM devices. Now, we are discussing automotive, medical and industrial devices. It is incredibly exciting to be part of a ground-breaking project that has been at the forefront of open source innovation since its inception.”

  • Stefano Stabellini, Principal Engineer, Tech Lead at Xilinx and Xen on ARM Committer and Maintainer

“Congratulations to the Xen Project on this milestone anniversary. As the first open source data center hypervisor, Xen played a key role in defining what virtualization technology could deliver and has been the foundation for many advancements in the modern data center and cloud computing. Intel has been involved with Xen development since the early days and enjoys strong collaboration with the Xen community, which helped make Xen the first hypervisor to include Intel® Virtualization Technology (VT-x) support, providing a more secure, efficient platform for server workload consolidation and the growth of cloud computing.”

  • Susie Li, Director of Open Source Virtualization Engineering, Intel Corp.

“It is amazing how a project that started 15 years ago has not lost any of its original appeal, despite the constant evolution of hardware architectures and new applications that were unimaginable when the Xen Project started. In certain segments, e.g. power management, the pace of innovation in Xen is just accelerating and serves as the ultimate reference for all other virtualization efforts. Happy quinceañera (sweet 15) Xen!”

  • Vojin Zivojnovic, CEO and Co-Founder of Aggios

Building the Journey Towards the Next 15 Years; Sneak Peek into Xen Project 4.12

The next Xen Project release is set for March 2019. The release continues to support the Xen Project’s efforts around security with cloud environments and rich features and architectural changes for automotive and embedded use cases. Expect:

  • Deprivileged Device Model: Under tech preview in QEMU 3.0, the feature adds extra restrictions to a device model running in domain 0 in order to prevent a compromised device model to attack the rest of the system.  
  • Capability to compile a PV-only version of Xen giving cloud providers simplified management, reducing the surface of attack, and the ability to build a Xen Project hypervisor configuration with no “classic” PV support at all.
  • Xen to boot multiple domains in parallel on Arm, in addition to dom0 enabling booting of domains in less than 1 second. This is the first step towards a dom0-less Xen, which impacts statically configured embedded systems that require very fast boot times.  
  • Reduction of codesize to 46 KSLOC for safety certification and the first phase of making the codebase MISRA C compliant.
    • MISRA C is a set of software development guidelines for the C programming language developed by the Motor Industry Software Reliability Association with the aim to facilitate code safety, security, portability, and reliability in the context of embedded systems.

Thank you for the last 15 years and for the next 15+ to come!

Lars Kurth, Chairperson of the Xen Project

hyperledger

Join us Wednesday, September 26, 2018 9:00 a.m. Pacific for an introductory webinar showing how to deploy Hyperledger Fabric.

Deploying a multi-component system like Hyperledger Fabric to production is challenging. Join us Wednesday, September 26, 2018 9:00 a.m. Pacific for an introductory webinar, presented by Alejandro (Sasha) Vicente Grabovetsky and Nicola Paoli of AID:Tech.

Why should you care?

Hyperledger Fabric is rather awesome, but deploying a distributed network has been known to give headaches and even migraines. In this talk, we will not be providing you with a guillotine that forever gets rid of these headaches, but instead we will talk you through some tools that can help you deploy a functioning, production-ready Hyperledger Fabric network on a Kubernetes cluster.

Who should attend?

Ideally, you are a Dev, an Ops or a DevOps interested in learning more about how to deploy Hyperledger Fabric to Kubernetes.

You might know a little bit about Hyperledger Fabric and about Docker containers and Kubernetes. We assume limited knowledge and will do our best to as possible and explain and demystify all the components along the way.

What we will talk about?

In this webinar, we will lower the threshold so that you can deploy your very own Hyperledger Fabric network onto Kubernetes. So what is each of these?

Hyperledger Fabric is a permissioned (unlike the permissionless Ethereum network) framework, allowing you to create consortium Blockchain networks, where one or more organisations share an immutable ledger of records and smart contracts (called “chaincode” in Hyperledger Fabric).

Kubernetes is a platform for deploying microservices (i.e. containerised applications, typically using Docker) applications on a cluster, such that the applications:

  • use fewer resources than when using dedicated (bare metal or virtual) machines for each component,
  • are self-healing, such that failed containers are restarted
  • and are configured in a declarative rather than procedural way, making them robust

We do this by using a set of Helm Charts. Rather than using a monolithic Helm Chart for the whole deployment, we use separate charts for each Hyperledger Fabric component, namely the Certificate Authority, Peer, CouchDB and Orderer. We demonstrate how to get these charts working together to provide a unified blockchain system.

Along the way, we will explain the different concepts you need to understand your Hyperledger Fabric network:

  • What is a Certificate Authority?
  • Why is the network split across Orderers and Peers?
  • And what are CouchDB and Apache Kafka doing in all of this?

We’ll also guide you in the right direction to other resources you can look at to expand your understanding on how Hyperledger Fabric works, including:

  • the official EdX course and our upcoming chapter on Composer,
  • Sasha’s own course on Hyperledger Fabric and Composer, and
  • we will be using the Helm Charts (Kubernetes packages) we created to make our own lives easier.

When and where?

The webinar will be running on Wednesday, September the 26th, 9-10am PDT.

What are you waiting for? Register here!

About the presenters

Sasha and Nicola work at AID:Tech, developing blockchain solutions leveraging a microservice architecture and Hyperledger Fabric and Composer frameworks to provide digital identities to transparently trace charitable donations and remittances as digital assets are exchanged.

Foundation reaches membership milestone, 10x growth in less than three years, from industry’s biggest cross-collaboration gathering around open source technologies

VANCOUVER, Canada – August 29, 2018 – Open Source Summit North America – The Cloud Native Computing Foundation® (CNCF®), which sustains and integrates open source technologies like Kubernetes® and Prometheus™, today announced that 38 new members have joined the Foundation – growing from 28 members at the Foundation’s launch in 2015 to 284 today.

According to the findings of CNCF’s brand new survey of nearly 2,500 developer or IT-related roles, the use of Foundation projects – including Envoy, Prometheus, containerd, and CoreDNS – is up over 200 percent on average in the last 6 months.This substantial growth in adoption is, in part, due to the advantages of having a neutral home for collaboration around cloud native projects. By joining CNCF, these new members are taking an active role in supporting the ecosystem’s growth and evolution.

“As the use and adoption of open source software continue to grow, it’s paramount that both individual and enterprise users contribute back to cloud native projects in order for the community to drive sustainable and agile innovation forward,” said Dan Kohn, Executive Director of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. “CNCF is thrilled to welcome these 38 new members and we look forward to bringing the entire community together later this year at our remaining KubeCon + CloudNativeCon events.”

The Foundation will host the inaugural KubeCon + CloudNativeCon China, from November 13-15 in Shanghai, and its annual North American KubeCon + CloudNativeCon event, from December 10-13 in Seattle – furthering the education and adoption of cloud native computing across the globe.

 About the newest Silver Members:

  • Aljabr’s mission is to unlock the power of reusable data pipelines for the cloud native era.
  • Altoros is a 300+ people strong consultancy helping Global 2000 organizations with a methodology, training, and end-to-end solution development—using cloud native technologies, blockchain, and AI.
  • Anaconda, Inc. is the most popular Python data science platform provider with 2.5 million downloads per month.
  • Armory is commercializing Spinnaker, an open source, multi-cloud continuous delivery platform for quickly releasing software.
  • Arrikto creates data management software for sharing cloud native environments across teams and locations.
  • Atomist is a platform purpose-built for delivering modern, cloud native applications, enabling teams to deliver software faster than ever imagined.
  • Banzai Cloud is simplifying the transition to microservices on Kubernetes.
  • BlueData provides the leading container-based software platform for AI, Machine Learning, and Big Data Analytics workloads – delivering easier, faster, and more cost-effective deployments with enterprise-grade security and performance.
  • BoxBoat is a premier container consultancy that enables faster development and automated deployments with Docker, Kubernetes, and cloud technologies.
  • Citrix (NASDAQ:CTXS) is powering a better way to work with unified workspace, networking, and analytics solutions that help organizations unlock innovation, engage customers, and boost productivity, without sacrificing security.
  • CloudBolt helps enterprise IT deploy and manage hybrid cloud infrastructure resources on multiple private and public cloud platforms including vCenter, OpenStack, AWS, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform as well as integrate with configuration management tools including Ansible, Chef, and Puppet.
  • CloudZone By Matrix is a leading public and private cloud provider, an AWS Premier Consulting Partner, a Gold Microsoft Azure Cloud Service Provider and a premium Google Cloud Platform Authorized Services Partner – offering a vast DevOps including designing, consulting, implementing and hands-on execution.
  • Cockroach Labs is a cloud native SQL database for building global, scalable cloud services that survive disasters.
  • ComponentSoft offers Kubernetes, Docker and OpenStack trainings, consultation, and support services throughout Europe and beyond, with 20+ years of experience in mission critical enterprise level open source systems.
  • DoiT International is a leading cloud consultancy specializing in cost optimization and cloud engineering in today’s multi-cloud world – delivering expert advice and tooling such as io and others for making cloud native application more cost effective.
  • ELASTX provides public cloud platforms and also hosted private Kubernetes with focus on security.
  • Exon LV is a software engineering company building solutions for cloud and Kubernetes – developing Containerum Platform for Kubernetes and providing enterprise-grade Kubernetes support and cluster maintenance.
  • Golden Gate University, founded in 1901, is a non-profit offering undergraduate and graduate programs in business and management, taxation, and law.
  • Gremlin aims to make the internet more reliable by preventing costly and reputation damaging outages – empowering engineers to safely experiment on complex systems to better understand weaknesses so they can build more resilient software.
  • InfraCloud Technologies provides product engineering and consulting services with a focus on cloud native computing to build web-scale products for startups/ISVs and helps enterprises modernize infrastructure and applications.
  • Kaloom is an emerging leader in fully automated data center networking software that significantly reduces the opex and enable certified solutions for white boxes to the Enterprises, Cloud, Gaming, DC operators and 5G Telco industries.
  • KubeMQ is a messaging backend, built for efficient migration from .NET/MSMQ environment to Kubernetes – providing smooth and graduate migration to containers architecture by addressing all .NET communication methods in Kubernetes environment.
  • Kumina designs, builds, operates and supports IT infrastructure solutions that help companies thrive online, excelling at Kubernetes and open source.
  • OCTO Technology is an IT consulting, design and implementation company.
  • OVH is a global, hyper-scale cloud provider that offers businesses industry-leading performance and value – managing and maintaining 28 data centers in 12 sites across 4 continents, and deploying its own global fiber optic network.
  • Pulumi provides a cloud native programming model and platform: real code (JS/TS, Python, and Go), to code, deploy, and manage cloud native apps: from infrastructure and containers, to kubernetes and serverless.
  • Replicated enables SaaS and software companies to leverage its cloud native architecture to ship the enterprise version of its applications in a “modern on-prem” fashion.
  • Scality builds the most powerful storage tools to make data easy to protect, search and manage anytime, on any cloud, giving customers the autonomy and agility necessary to be competitive in a data-driven economy.
  • Scalyr is the blazing-fast log management platform for the engineering front line –architected to be fast, simple, and shareable.
  • Sensu Inc. is the creator and maintainer of Sensu, the open source monitoring event pipeline – empowering businesses to automate their monitoring workflow and gain deep visibility into their infrastructure, applications, and operations.
  • SnapRoute is building the industry’s first microservices NOS for cloud native environments – elevating the NOS into the cloud native era to deliver a CI/CD network infrastructure for the DevOps age.
  • SysEleven provides premium internet services with focus on performant and highly available setups – made in Germany.
  • Volterra‘s Edge Services Platform (VES) addresses modern applications and autonomous systems requiring globally distributed connectivity and application delivery with operational and developer simplicity.
  • WaveMaker HyScale is a modern DevOps platform for container-based continuous delivery –giving enterprises automated containerization of applications, automatic deployment configuration, fine grained change-tracking and single pane of glass for provisioning into multiple Kubernetes clusters.
  • YLD is a custom software engineering consultancy pioneering in cutting-edge technologies such as Node.js, React.js and Kubernetes–enabling enterprises to innovate and stay ahead of competition.

 About the newest End-User Members & Supporters:

  • adidas employs 56,888 people from over 100 countries – producing more than 900 million product units every year and generating sales of € 21.218 billion.
  • Form3 provides a cloud native, real-time payment technology platform to banks and regulated fintechs.
  • JPMorgan Chase & Co. (NYSE: JPM) is a leading global financial services firm with assets of $2.6 trillion and operations worldwide – serving millions of customers in the U.S. and many of the world’s most prominent corporate, institutional and government clients.

adidas, Form3, and JPMorgan Chase join other end user companies including Box, Capital One, eBay, GitHub, Goldman Sachs, NCSOFT, The New York Times, Ticketmaster, Twitter, Vevo, and Zalando in CNCF’s End User Community. This group meets monthly and advises the CNCF Governing Board and Technical Oversight Committee on key challenges, emerging use cases and areas of opportunity and new growth for cloud native technologies.

Additional Resources

 About Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Cloud native computing uses an open source software stack to deploy applications as microservices, packaging each part into its own container, and dynamically orchestrating those containers to optimize resource utilization. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts critical components of cloud native software stacks, including Kubernetes and Prometheus. CNCF serves as the neutral home for collaboration and brings together the industry’s top developers, end users and vendors – including the world’s largest public cloud and enterprise software companies as well as dozens of innovative startups. CNCF is part of The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization. For more information about CNCF, please visit www.cncf.io.

 ###

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page:https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact

Kristen Evans

The Linux Foundation

PR@CNCF.io

Google’s donation will allow Kubernetes community to self-manage cloud resources, increasing project control and velocity

VANCOUVER, Canada – August 29, 2018 – Open Source Summit North America – The Cloud Native Computing Foundation® (CNCF®), which sustains and integrates open source technologies like Kubernetes® and Prometheus™, today announced that Google Cloud has begun transferring ownership and management of the Kubernetes project’s cloud resources to CNCF community contributors. Google Cloud will help fund this move with a $9 million grant of Google Cloud Platform credits, divided over three years, to cover the infrastructure costs associated with Kubernetes development and distribution, such as running the continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) pipelines and providing the container image download repository.

With this move, CNCF and Kubernetes community members will take ownership of all day-to-day Kubernetes project operations. Responsibilities will include operational tasks for the development of Kubernetes such as testing and builds, as well as maintenance and operations for the distribution of Kubernetes. The Google Cloud credit grant will primarily be dedicated to funding scalability testing and maintenance of the infrastructure required to run Kubernetes development, ensuring that the project continues to be battle-tested and enterprise-ready.

“With the rapid growth of Kubernetes, and broad participation from organizations, cloud providers and users alike, we’re thrilled to see Google Cloud hand over ownership of Kubernetes CI/CD to the community that helped build it into one of the highest-velocity projects of all time,” said Dan Kohn, executive director of CNCF. “Google Cloud’s generous contribution is an important step in empowering the Kubernetes community to take ownership of its management and sustainability – all for the benefit of the project’s ever-growing user base.”

To learn more about today’s news, please read William Denniss’ post on the Google Cloud Platform blog.

The contribution of the Kubernetes project from Google occurred soon after the creation of CNCF in late 2015 and, until now, Google Cloud has continued to manage and fund the Kubernetes CI/CD processes. Since coming into CNCF, Kubernetes has grown into one of the world’s most popular open source projects and, according to Redmonk, is running in more than 50 percent of Fortune 100 companies for container orchestration. To facilitate and support this growth, CNCF established a Certified Kubernetes program to define a consistent experience across Kubernetes distributions, launched the Kubernetes Certified Service Provider (KCSP) program ensuring that enterprises receive support to roll out new applications more quickly and more efficiently than before and shepherded Kubernetes through the incubation process to become the first project to graduate from CNCF.

“Since releasing Kubernetes in 2014, Google has remained heavily involved in the project and actively contributes to its vibrant community. We also believe that for an open source project to truly thrive, all aspects of a mature project should be maintained by the people developing it. In passing the baton of operational responsibilities to Kubernetes contributors with the stewardship of the CNCF, we look forward to seeing how the project continues to evolve and experience breakneck adoption,” said Sarah Novotny, Head of Open Source Strategy for Google Cloud.

Global organizations like Ancestry, Blackrock, BlaBlaCar, Bloomberg, Buffer, Comcast, eBay, Goldman Sachs, GolfNow, ING, JD.com, Lyft, Nordstrom, Pearson, Pinterest, Sling TV, Squarespace, Ticketmaster, The New York Times, Uber, and many more use Kubernetes in production at massive scale.

Additional Resources

About Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Cloud native computing uses an open source software stack to deploy applications as microservices, packaging each part into its own container, and dynamically orchestrating those containers to optimize resource utilization. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts critical components of cloud native software stacks, including Kubernetes and Prometheus. CNCF serves as the neutral home for collaboration and brings together the industry’s top developers, end users and vendors – including the world’s largest public cloud and enterprise software companies as well as dozens of innovative startups. CNCF is part of The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization. For more information about CNCF, please visit www.cncf.io.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact

Kristen Evans

The Linux Foundation

PR@CNCF.io