Leaders in open source embedded and Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) development will gather to exchange knowledge and collaborate on new and upcoming advances

SAN FRANCISCO, January 25, 2018The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the program for Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit North America, taking place March 12-14 in Portland, OR. Attendees have access to all sessions and activities at both events, which are co-located in the same venue.

Now in its 13th year, Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) is the premier vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using Linux in embedded products. The conference gathers user-space developers, product vendors, kernel and systems developers to collaborate.

Launched in 2016, OpenIoT Summit is a technical conference for the developers and architects working on industrial IoT. It provides the technical knowledge needed to deliver smart connected products and solutions that take advantage of the rapid evolution of IoT technologies. It is the only IoT event focused on the development of open IoT solutions.

Keynote speakers include:

  • Massimo Banzi, Co-Founder, Arduino Project
  • Tim Bird, Senior Software Engineer, Sony Electronics
  • Amber Case, Author and Fellow at Harvard’s Berkman Klein Center
  • Jonathan Corbet, Author, Kernel Developer and Executive Editor of LWN.net
  • Philip DesAutels, PhD, Senior Director of IoT, The Linux Foundation
  • Patricia Florissi, VP & Global CTO for Sales, Dell EMC
  • Antony Passemard, Product Management Lead – Cloud IoT, Google
  • Imad Sousou, Vice President, Software and Services Group & General Manager, Intel Open Source Technology Center, Intel Corporation
  • Kate Stewart, Senior Director of Strategic Programs, The Linux Foundation
  • Daniel Wilson, Roboticist & Author

Embedded Linux Conference session highlights include:

  • What Every Driver Developer Should Know About RT – Julia Cartwright, National Instruments
  • The Salmon Diet: Up-streaming Drivers as a Form of Optimization – Gilad Ben-Yossef, Arm
  • Not Really, but Kind of Real Time Linux – Sandra Capri, Ambient Sensors
  • An Introduction to Asymmetric Multiprocessing: When This Architecture Can Be a Game Changer and How to Survive it – Nicola La Gloria & Laura Nao, Kynetics

OpenIoT Summit session highlights include:

  • Using Microservices to Create a Flexible IoT Software Platform – Jim White, Dell
  • Mozilla’s IoT Framework: Putting People First – Kathy Giori, Mozilla
  • Building an Open Source Stack for IoT Analytics – Fangjin Yang, Imply
  • Mixed Critical IoT Edge Systems Through Virtualization – Michele Paolino, Virtual Open Systems

The full lineup of sessions can be viewed here.

One registration provides access to all activities at both Embedded Linux Conference and OpenIoT Summit. Registration is discounted to $550 through January 28. Discounted academic and hobbyist rates are also available. Applications for diversity scholarships are currently being accepted. For information on eligibility and how to apply, please click here.

The Linux Foundation events are where the world’s leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies.

Members of the press who would like to request a press pass to attend should contact Dan Brown at dbrown@linuxfoundation.org.

These events are made possible thanks to Diamond Sponsor Intel; Platinum Sponsor Qualcomm; and Gold Sponsor Civil Infrastructure Platform.

Additional Resources

YouTube: Why Attend Linux Foundation Events (https://youtu.be/X_rLxfmLlYY)

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage.

Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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CES 2018, LAS VEGAS – January 10, 2018Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open platform for the connected car, today announced that AGL is now in Toyota vehicles around the world. AGL also announced five new members, including Amazon Alexa, which joined as a Silver member.

“Having AGL in vehicles on the road globally is a significant milestone for both AGL and the automotive open source community,” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at The Linux Foundation. “Toyota has been a strong proponent of open source for years, and we believe their adoption of an AGL-based infotainment system has set a precedent that other automakers will follow.”

The first AGL-based Toyota infotainment system was announced earlier this year on the 2018 Toyota Camry in the United States. The system is now in vehicles globally following Entune 3.0 in the 2018 Toyota Camry in United States.

“Adopting open source software and being actively involved in projects like AGL represents a significant part of our technology strategy,” said Keiji Yamamoto, Executive Vice President, Connected Company of Toyota Motor Corporation. “The flexibility of the AGL platform has allowed us to quickly roll-out our new infotainment system to multiple vehicle models across the world.”

AGL Showcase at CES 2018

At CES 2018, AGL will be demonstrating the latest version of its infotainment platform, the Unified Code Base (UCB) 5.0, in the AGL Showcase at the Venetian, Lido ballrooms 3002-3004.

Developed through a joint effort by dozens of member companies, the UCB is an open source infotainment platform that can serve as the de facto industry standard. Sharing a single software platform across the industry reduces fragmentation and accelerates time-to-market by encouraging the growth of a global ecosystem of developers that can build a product once and have it work for multiple automakers.

The AGL Showcase will also include more than 15 AGL members demonstrating their technology and proof of concepts (PoCs) running on Automotive Grade Linux: Aisin AW, Audiokinetic, DENSO, DENSO TEN, Elektrobit, ForgeRock, Igalia, Intel, LG Silicon Valley Lab, Microchip, NTT DATA MSE, Panasonic, RealVNC, Renesas, SafeRide Technologies and Tuxera. More information about the demonstrations is available here.

AGL Welcomes Five New Members Including Amazon Alexa

Amazon has joined AGL as a Silver member. The Amazon Alexa team plans to actively contribute to and support voice recognition work for the AGL platform. Additional new members include Green Hills Software, Kernkonzept, SanCloud and SYSGO AG.

Member Quotes:

“We’re delighted to support the work AGL is doing to bring in-car voice experiences to customers,” said Ned Curic, Vice President, Amazon Alexa. “It’s day one for Alexa in cars, and AGL’s work will be instrumental in building a voice-first future for the automotive industry.”

“With over a decade of deploying safe, secure embedded virtualization in mission critical systems, Green Hills Software is pleased to be contributing its expertise for automotive mixed criticality consolidation to the AGL community,” said Dan Mender, VP business development, Green Hills Software. “We look forward to collaborating and applying our proven knowhow to the evolution of in-vehicle electronics consolidation for the connected cars of the future.”

“Kernkonzept is actively participating in open source through our L4Re microhypervisor for security/safety-critical and virtualization-enabled applications,” said Michael Hohmuth, CEO of Kernkonzept. “We joined Automotive Grade Linux to further our participation in the open source community and to help enable the AGL software stack for systems that need functional safety.”

“We have a strong background in innovative custom design of hardware/software solutions and see open source as a critical piece of emerging technologies,” said Marc Murphy, Director of SanCloud. “As members of AGL, we see a prominent future for the connected car ecosystem and are excited to have the opportunity to expand our automotive development platform to include support for the AGL platform.”

As member of the Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), we continue to build on our heritage in Linux, use it for the growing automotive market and take part in the rapid innovation process,” said Franz Walkembach, VP Marketing & Product Strategy, SYSGO AG. “Specifically, ELinOS is our commercial off-the-shelf product on Linux and works out of the box as guestOS on our PikeOS real time operating system that includes a type 1 hypervisor.”

About Automotive Grade Linux (AGL)

Automotive Grade Linux is a collaborative open source project that is bringing together automakers, suppliers and technology companies to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open software stack for the connected car. With Linux at its core, AGL is developing an open platform from the ground up that can serve as the de facto industry standard to enable rapid development of new features and technologies. Although initially focused on In-Vehicle-Infotainment (IVI), AGL is the only organization planning to address all software in the vehicle, including instrument cluster, heads up display, telematics, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous driving. The AGL platform is available to all, and anyone can participate in its development. Learn more: https://www.automotivelinux.org/

Automotive Grade Linux is a Collaborative Project at The Linux Foundation. Linux Foundation Collaborative Projects are independently funded software projects that harness the power of collaborative development to fuel innovation across industries and ecosystems. www.linuxfoundation.org

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

Media Inquiries

Emily Olin

Automotive Grade Linux

eolin@linuxfoundation.org

SAN FRANCISCO, December 22, 2017 – Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open platform for the connected car, today announced that the latest release of the AGL infotainment platform, Unified Code Base (UCB) 5.0, will be available later this month and on display at CES 2018 along with more than 20 other AGL demos by member companies. Automotive Grade Linux is an open source project hosted at The Linux Foundation.

“AGL has gained a tremendous amount of traction this year as the leading open source automotive infotainment platform. This is clearly reflected by the number of participants that will be demonstrating AGL-based products and services at CES 2018 in the AGL Ballroom.” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at The Linux Foundation. “We are very excited to showcase a variety of AGL use cases that our members have developed at CES.”

Developed through a joint effort by dozens of member companies, the AGL Unified Code Base (UCB) is an open source infotainment platform that can serve as the de facto industry standard. Sharing a single software platform across the industry reduces fragmentation and accelerates time-to-market by encouraging the growth of a global ecosystem of developers that can build a product once and have it work for multiple automakers.

Many AGL members have already started integrating the UCB into their production plans, such as Toyota. Announced earlier this year, the 2018 Toyota Camry with Entune 3.0 is the first Toyota vehicle on the market with an AGL-based infotainment system in the United States.

The AGL UCB 5.0 includes an operating system, middleware and application framework. Key features include:

  • Reference applications including media player, tuner, navigation, web browser, Bluetooth, WiFi, HVAC control, audio mixer and vehicle controls
  • Integration with simultaneous display on instrument cluster
  • Multiple display capability including rear seat entertainment
  • Wide range of hardware board support including Renesas, Qualcomm Technologies, Intel, Texas Instrument, NXP
  • Software Development Kit (SDK) with application templates
  • SmartDeviceLink ready for easy integration and access to smartphone applications
  • Application Services APIs for navigation, voice recognition, bluetooth, audio, tuner and CAN signaling
  • Near Field Communication (NFC) and identity management capabilities including multilingual support
  • Over-The-Air (OTA) upgrade capabilities
  • Security frameworks with role-based-access control

With the UCB platform maturing, AGL has expanded beyond infotainment and work is currently underway to develop software profiles using the UCB for telematics, instrument cluster and heads-up-display (HUD). The AGL roadmap also includes advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), functional safety and autonomous driving in the future.

Automotive Grade Linux at CES 2018

With more than 110 members, AGL is supported by a broad ecosystem of automakers, suppliers, semiconductor companies and software and service providers. Many of these members have integrated AGL into their demonstrations at CES 2018.

As an official CES 2018 exhibitor, AGL will have a dedicated AGL ballroom in The Venetian, Lido 3002-3004, that will be open to the public from January 9-12, 2018. The AGL ballroom will feature demonstrations of the latest UCB 5.0 infotainment platform, as well as more than 15 AGL members demonstrating their technology and proof of concepts (PoCs) running on Automotive Grade Linux:

  • Aisin AW: Navigation of AGL open source project and product navigation using the same service interface.
  • Audiokinetic: Auditory displays for HMI and safety applications using Wwise Automotive authoring, profiling, and real-time editing tools fully integrated within the AGL platform.
  • DENSOIntegrated Automobile HMI Platform: All contents from AGL, Instrument Cluster (IC) and Heads-up-Display (HUD) into one unified design using a hypervisor.
  • DENSO TEN: AGL vehicle data architecture including CAN simulator and multiple vehicle data interface and AGL Continuous Integration (CI) tool using Fuego to deploy, test and report automatically.
  • Elektrobit: Cockpit demo featuring a holistic HMI platform supporting multiple displays (navigation and media, climate control and weather updates), modalities and running on two AGL stacks for instrument cluster and infotainment.
  • ForgeRock: AGL identity layer including in-vehicle personalization, user profile management in the cloud, user-to-vehicle authentication, secure vehicle identities and securing data from vehicle-to-cloud.
  • Igalia: The latest version of Chromium running on Wayland and AGL environments; the browser will have the same HTML5 support as Chrome for desktop. There will also be a second demo of a web-based IVI interface running on top of the same browser.
  • Intel: Intel Transport Division will demonstrate the AGL platform running the same binary for core OS and applications on multiple platform types, including an Automotive Reference platform, a compute card and an industrial Up Squared board.
  • LG Silicon Valley Lab: Integrated driving simulator featuring three different systems running AGL, AGL platform enhancements and connected-car cloud services.
  • Microchip: Configure and control a complete telematics and infotainment networking system from a centralized root node running AGL to manage audio, video and IP over a single unshielded twisted pair (UTP) cable.
  • NTT DATA MSE: Running SmartDeviceLink on the AGL UCB to connect smart devices to in-vehicle infotainment systems for preventing driver distraction through leveraging vehicle data.
  • Panasonic: Multi-display HMI technology using a hypervisor with comfortable application migration between three displays using multi-layout window technology. Uses a hypervisor for a stable working meter on the IC display, even if the In-Vehicle Infotainment (IVI) system is unstable.
  • RealVNC: Connected car software including VNC Telematics, VNC Enhanced, and popular connectivity standards like MirrorLink, SmartDeviceLink, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and Baidu CarLife running on AGL.
  • Renesas: R-Car gen3 based advanced power management capability implementation, Cloud assisted application runs on Chromium, and Cybersecurity management system runs on AGL.
  • SafeRide Technologies: Intelligence-based cyber security software stack for connected and autonomous vehicles enabling broad detection and response for zero-day attacks, with an AGL open stack.
  • TuxeraAutomotive data storage for the AGL platform, including improved fast boot time, storage system information application/tooling and camera application for ADAS/rear-view camera feedback and data recording to a centralized IVI storage (black box).

Additional demonstrations by AGL members across the show include:

  • DENSOIntegrated Automobile HMI Platform: All contents from AGL, Instrument Cluster and Heads-up-Display (HUD) into one unified design using a hypervisor; LVCC, North Hall #7917.
  • Karamba Security: Securing cars from known and unknown vulnerabilities and how to prevent attacks on an AGL systems, with zero false positives; Karamba Security Demo Suite at the Bellagio Hotel.
  • Qualcomm Technologies: AGL on a demonstration vehicle at LVCC, Central Hall #10948, and additional AGL based demos at LVCC, North Hall #5616, including multimedia on multiple displays, navigation, web browsing, CAN integration and in-vehicle Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity functionality on the Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ 820A Automotive Platform.
  • Texas Instruments: AGL is demonstrated on TI Jacinto automotive processors as part of Jacinto™ 6 demo wall; the TI village is located at LVCC, North Hall rooms N115-N117.
  • Wipro Ltd: Contextual Connected cockpit demonstration for multiple discrete domains; private Wipro suite at the Westgate hotel.

About Automotive Grade Linux (AGL)

Automotive Grade Linux is a collaborative open source project that is bringing together automakers, suppliers and technology companies to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open software stack for the connected car. With Linux at its core, AGL is developing an open platform from the ground up that can serve as the de facto industry standard to enable rapid development of new features and technologies. Although initially focused on In-Vehicle-Infotainment (IVI), AGL is the only organization planning to address all software in the vehicle, including instrument cluster, heads up display, telematics, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous driving.The AGL platform is available to all, and anyone can participate in its development. Learn more: https://www.automotivelinux.org/

Automotive Grade Linux is a Collaborative Project at The Linux Foundation. Linux Foundation Collaborative Projects are independently funded software projects that harness the power of collaborative development to fuel innovation across industries and ecosystems. www.linuxfoundation.org

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Qualcomm and Snapdragon are trademarks of Qualcomm Incorporated, registered in the United States and other countries. Qualcomm Snapdragon is a  product of Qualcomm Technologies, Inc. Inc. and/or its subsidiaries.

Media Inquiries

pr@automotivelinux.org

 

Adobe, Desay SV Automotive, Fiberdyne Systems, Nuance and Trend Micro join Automotive Grade Linux

SAN FRANCISCO, October 18, 2017Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open platform for the connected car, is announcing that five new members have joined the project including Adobe, Desay SV Automotive, Fiberdyne Systems, Nuance and Trend Micro.

“The AGL ecosystem is rapidly growing, and we are very excited to expand into new areas like voice recognition and digital marketing, which will enable automakers to easily integrate new consumer features and services into their AGL-based infotainment systems,” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at The Linux Foundation. “We look forward to working with all of our new members as we continue to evolve the AGL Unified Code Base (UCB) and expand into new functions like telematics, instrument cluster and heads-up-display.”

The AGL community is coming together for their bi-annual All Member Meeting on October 18-19 in Dresden, Germany. The All Member Meeting allows the AGL community to learn about the latest developments, share best practices and collaborate to drive rapid innovation across the industry. Details can be found here.

New Member Quotes:

Adobe
“With Adobe Experience Cloud, brands have the analytics insights and content management capabilities to deliver great, personalized experiences. As connected and driverless cars gain more traction, it is opening up new ways for consumers to enjoy their favorite services, and we are building technology to help brands capitalize on these opportunities,” said Colin Morris, director of product management, Adobe Analytics Cloud. “We believe that in order to drive these connected car innovations, it will require close cooperation across car makers, operating system providers, and important open source initiatives like Automotive Grade Linux.”

Desay SV Automotive
“As a leading automotive electronic solution provider for vehicle manufacturers, Desay SV Automotive is proud to be a member of the Automotive Grade Linux community. In response to the increasing demand for feature rich, smart and connected In-Vehicle Systems, we believe collaborating with AGL is the best way to bridge the stability required by the automotive industry with the rapid progress of the open source world.”

Fiberdyne Systems
“Fiberdyne Systems is passionate about creating the best audio experience in the vehicle,” said Julian Merritt, CEO of Fiberdyne Systems. “We are delighted to join Automotive Grade Linux and contribute our expertise in audio and DSP to the community.”

Nuance
“We are proud and excited to join the Automotive Grade Linux community and share in AGL’s goal to develop an open industry standard platform that accelerates the development of connected mobility technologies,” said Laith Shina, Vice President of Automotive Strategy, Nuance. “We look forward to bringing our expertise in multi-modal user interfaces, conversational natural language understanding and artificial intelligence to this community and working together to make the future of automotive technology a reality.”

Trend Micro
“Linux, as an open source operating system used to develop automotive-related features, is a current trend, and Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) shows determination and capability in this area. Trend Micro, a global leader in cybersecurity solutions, helps to make the world safe for exchanging digital information among all connected devices,” said Oscar Chang, EVP of Research and Development at Trend Micro. “With 30 years of experience in the security industry, we have professional threat experts around the world to protect internet security and combat unknown threats. With machine learning based-technology, we are able and glad to work with AGL to secure connected and autonomous cars in the future.”

The full list of AGL members is available here.

About Automotive Grade Linux (AGL)
Automotive Grade Linux is a collaborative open source project that is bringing together automakers, suppliers and technology companies to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open software stack for the connected car. With Linux at its core, AGL is developing an open platform from the ground up that can serve as the de facto industry standard to enable rapid development of new features and technologies. Although initially focused on In-Vehicle-Infotainment (IVI), AGL is the only organization planning to address all software in the vehicle, including instrument cluster, heads up display, telematics, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous driving. The AGL platform is available to all, and anyone can participate in its development. Learn more: https://www.automotivelinux.org/

Automotive Grade Linux is hosted at The Linux Foundation. Linux Foundation projects are independently funded software projects that harness the power of collaborative development to fuel innovation across industries and ecosystems. www.linuxfoundation.org

Additional Resources

###

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Inquiries
Emily Olin
Automotive Grade Linux
eolin@linuxfoundation.org

Adobe, Desay SV Automotive, Fiberdyne Systems, Nuance and Trend Micro join Automotive Grade Linux

SAN FRANCISCO, October 18, 2017Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open platform for the connected car, is announcing that five new members have joined the project including Adobe, Desay SV Automotive, Fiberdyne Systems, Nuance and Trend Micro.

“The AGL ecosystem is rapidly growing, and we are very excited to expand into new areas like voice recognition and digital marketing, which will enable automakers to easily integrate new consumer features and services into their AGL-based infotainment systems,” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at The Linux Foundation. “We look forward to working with all of our new members as we continue to evolve the AGL Unified Code Base (UCB) and expand into new functions like telematics, instrument cluster and heads-up-display.”

The AGL community is coming together for their bi-annual All Member Meeting on October 18-19 in Dresden, Germany. The All Member Meeting allows the AGL community to learn about the latest developments, share best practices and collaborate to drive rapid innovation across the industry. Details can be found here.

New Member Quotes:

Adobe
“With Adobe Experience Cloud, brands have the analytics insights and content management capabilities to deliver great, personalized experiences. As connected and driverless cars gain more traction, it is opening up new ways for consumers to enjoy their favorite services, and we are building technology to help brands capitalize on these opportunities,” said Colin Morris, director of product management, Adobe Analytics Cloud. “We believe that in order to drive these connected car innovations, it will require close cooperation across car makers, operating system providers, and important open source initiatives like Automotive Grade Linux.”

Desay SV Automotive
“As a leading automotive electronic solution provider for vehicle manufacturers, Desay SV Automotive is proud to be a member of the Automotive Grade Linux community. In response to the increasing demand for feature rich, smart and connected In-Vehicle Systems, we believe collaborating with AGL is the best way to bridge the stability required by the automotive industry with the rapid progress of the open source world.”

Fiberdyne Systems
“Fiberdyne Systems is passionate about creating the best audio experience in the vehicle,” said Julian Merritt, CEO of Fiberdyne Systems. “We are delighted to join Automotive Grade Linux and contribute our expertise in audio and DSP to the community.”

Nuance
“We are proud and excited to join the Automotive Grade Linux community and share in AGL’s goal to develop an open industry standard platform that accelerates the development of connected mobility technologies,” said Laith Shina, Vice President of Automotive Strategy, Nuance. “We look forward to bringing our expertise in multi-modal user interfaces, conversational natural language understanding and artificial intelligence to this community and working together to make the future of automotive technology a reality.”

Trend Micro
“Linux, as an open source operating system used to develop automotive-related features, is a current trend, and Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) shows determination and capability in this area. Trend Micro, a global leader in cybersecurity solutions, helps to make the world safe for exchanging digital information among all connected devices,” said Oscar Chang, EVP of Research and Development at Trend Micro. “With 30 years of experience in the security industry, we have professional threat experts around the world to protect internet security and combat unknown threats. With machine learning based-technology, we are able and glad to work with AGL to secure connected and autonomous cars in the future.”

The full list of AGL members is available here.

About Automotive Grade Linux (AGL)
Automotive Grade Linux is a collaborative open source project that is bringing together automakers, suppliers and technology companies to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open software stack for the connected car. With Linux at its core, AGL is developing an open platform from the ground up that can serve as the de facto industry standard to enable rapid development of new features and technologies. Although initially focused on In-Vehicle-Infotainment (IVI), AGL is the only organization planning to address all software in the vehicle, including instrument cluster, heads up display, telematics, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous driving. The AGL platform is available to all, and anyone can participate in its development. Learn more: https://www.automotivelinux.org/

Automotive Grade Linux is hosted at The Linux Foundation. Linux Foundation projects are independently funded software projects that harness the power of collaborative development to fuel innovation across industries and ecosystems. www.linuxfoundation.org

Additional Resources

###

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Inquiries
Emily Olin
Automotive Grade Linux
eolin@linuxfoundation.org

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”20735″ alignment=”center” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]One key benefit of open source is its ability to enable rapid innovation. Collaborating on non-competitive pieces of technology frees up resources, enabling companies to focus more on developing new products and services.

We are seeing this play out now in the automotive industry as automakers are adopting open source software for core technologies like the infotainment operating system. This allows them to focus more resources towards the industry-wide race to develop new technologies, mobility services, and autonomous vehicles.

According to the 2017 Autotrader Car Tech Impact Study, 53 percent of consumers expect vehicle technology to be as robust as their smartphone. Unfortunately, the automotive industry has fallen behind the smartphone in terms of features and functionality. Automotive innovation is too slow, time-to-market is too long, and there’s very little software reuse.

Part of the problem is that today’s connected car uses approximately 100 million lines of code. Compare that to the Android operating system, which runs on 12-15 million lines of code, and the average iPhone app which uses less than 50,000 lines. It’s no wonder that the product development cycle for automotive companies is so much longer than for tech companies. According to some industry data, the development of an infotainment system traditionally takes 36-39 months.  In that time period, three or four versions of iPhone and Android phones will be released.

One of the main obstacles preventing automakers from innovating as quickly as tech companies is that the infotainment landscape is very fragmented. Imagine for a second if each PC or laptop manufacturer had its own version of an operating system; this would mean that application developers would have to make sure their software works with each manufacturer. What a mess! Yet this is exactly the situation we have in the automotive market. Each automaker has its own proprietary system that was built using a custom version of Linux, QNX, or Windows Embedded, and there’s very little code reuse.

Innovating with open source

To reduce this fragmentation, the Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) community at The Linux Foundation is building an open source platform that can serve as the de facto industry standard. Sharing a common platform enables developers to build an application once and have it work everywhere. Automakers can focus on developing new products and innovative new features that can be brought to market faster.  

The AGL infotainment platform, the Unified Code Base (UCB), is quickly gaining momentum across the industry. Toyota has adopted the AGL platform for its next-generation infotainment system, which debuts on the 2018 Toyota Camry and will roll out to most Toyota and Lexus vehicles in North America. And we expect to see more products and vehicles with AGL roll-out over the next couple of years.

AGL’s first focus was on infotainment, but we are planning to address all software in the vehicle including instrument cluster, heads-up-display, telematics, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), and autonomous driving. As the race towards self-driving cars continues to heat up, it’s become clear that the amount of code needed to support autonomous driving is too large for any one company to develop on its own.  

An open source platform for autonomous driving will help accelerate the development of self-driving technology while creating a sustainable ecosystem that can maintain it as it evolves over time. We believe the first step is to create an open, crowdsourced mapping database where automakers can contribute and access real-time 3D map data. AGL will soon to be in millions of cars on the road. With the support of our rapidly growing community, we hope to drive the cross-industry collaboration needed to accelerate development for autonomous vehicles.

Software has become one of the backbones of the automotive industry. It powers applications from infotainment to advanced driver assistance systems and autonomous driving. By bringing the industry together around a shared platform, AGL is enabling automakers to innovate faster, and quickly bring new products to market that will enhance the customer experience and impact the bottom line.

If you are interested in riding the wave with us, visit our website at automotivelinux.org.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”20735″ alignment=”center” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]One key benefit of open source is its ability to enable rapid innovation. Collaborating on non-competitive pieces of technology frees up resources, enabling companies to focus more on developing new products and services.

We are seeing this play out now in the automotive industry as automakers are adopting open source software for core technologies like the infotainment operating system. This allows them to focus more resources towards the industry-wide race to develop new technologies, mobility services, and autonomous vehicles.

According to the 2017 Autotrader Car Tech Impact Study, 53 percent of consumers expect vehicle technology to be as robust as their smartphone. Unfortunately, the automotive industry has fallen behind the smartphone in terms of features and functionality. Automotive innovation is too slow, time-to-market is too long, and there’s very little software reuse.

Part of the problem is that today’s connected car uses approximately 100 million lines of code. Compare that to the Android operating system, which runs on 12-15 million lines of code, and the average iPhone app which uses less than 50,000 lines. It’s no wonder that the product development cycle for automotive companies is so much longer than for tech companies. According to some industry data, the development of an infotainment system traditionally takes 36-39 months.  In that time period, three or four versions of iPhone and Android phones will be released.

One of the main obstacles preventing automakers from innovating as quickly as tech companies is that the infotainment landscape is very fragmented. Imagine for a second if each PC or laptop manufacturer had its own version of an operating system; this would mean that application developers would have to make sure their software works with each manufacturer. What a mess! Yet this is exactly the situation we have in the automotive market. Each automaker has its own proprietary system that was built using a custom version of Linux, QNX, or Windows Embedded, and there’s very little code reuse.

Innovating with open source

To reduce this fragmentation, the Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) community at The Linux Foundation is building an open source platform that can serve as the de facto industry standard. Sharing a common platform enables developers to build an application once and have it work everywhere. Automakers can focus on developing new products and innovative new features that can be brought to market faster.  

The AGL infotainment platform, the Unified Code Base (UCB), is quickly gaining momentum across the industry. Toyota has adopted the AGL platform for its next-generation infotainment system, which debuts on the 2018 Toyota Camry and will roll out to most Toyota and Lexus vehicles in North America. And we expect to see more products and vehicles with AGL roll-out over the next couple of years.

AGL’s first focus was on infotainment, but we are planning to address all software in the vehicle including instrument cluster, heads-up-display, telematics, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), and autonomous driving. As the race towards self-driving cars continues to heat up, it’s become clear that the amount of code needed to support autonomous driving is too large for any one company to develop on its own.  

An open source platform for autonomous driving will help accelerate the development of self-driving technology while creating a sustainable ecosystem that can maintain it as it evolves over time. We believe the first step is to create an open, crowdsourced mapping database where automakers can contribute and access real-time 3D map data. AGL will soon to be in millions of cars on the road. With the support of our rapidly growing community, we hope to drive the cross-industry collaboration needed to accelerate development for autonomous vehicles.

Software has become one of the backbones of the automotive industry. It powers applications from infotainment to advanced driver assistance systems and autonomous driving. By bringing the industry together around a shared platform, AGL is enabling automakers to innovate faster, and quickly bring new products to market that will enhance the customer experience and impact the bottom line.

If you are interested in riding the wave with us, visit our website at automotivelinux.org.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

SAN FRANCISCO, February 13, 2017Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative open source project developing a Linux-based, open platform for the connected car, today announced that six new members have joined Automotive Grade Linux and The Linux Foundation. DrimAES joins AGL at the Silver level while ARM, Elektrobit, RealVNC, Telenav and Tuxera join AGL at the Bronze level.

“We saw a 60% membership growth in 2016, and we expect that momentum to continue in 2017,” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux. “Our new members represent a wide group of skills and expertise, from location-based services to digital storage, which will be valuable as we continue to enhance our UCB infotainment platform and expand into other automotive applications like telematics and instrument cluster.”

AGL has reached several major milestones over the past couple of months. With these six new members, and the recent announcements of Suzuki and Daimler earlier this year, AGL now has 90+ members including ten OEMs. AGL also recently announced the third release of the AGL Unified Code Base (UCB) distribution 3.0, which was on display at CES 2017.

New Member Quotes:

ARM

“We believe common software architectures are essential to enable carmakers and suppliers to rapidly innovate,” said Richard York, vice president of embedded marketing, ARM. “Around 90 percent of infotainment systems are built using ARM®-based technology. By supporting Automotive Grade Linux, we contribute to the ecosystem of OEMs and system integrators that build these efficient systems, enabling them to take full advantage of shared software across the industry.”

DrimAES

“We are delighted to join Automotive Grade Linux and help develop a shared software platform for the industry,” said Guktae Kim, CEO of DrimAES. “We believe the in-car experience should be as intuitive as a smartphone, which is why we are developing new embedded solutions with an advanced user interface (UI) based on AGL that we look forward to sharing with the community.”

Elektrobit

“We look forward to working with Automotive Grade Linux to provide new opportunities for the connected car,” said Martin Schleicher, executive vice president strategy and partnerships at Elektrobit. “Our software solutions and knowledge of connected car infrastructure and advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) will enable AGL to evolve the next generation vehicle architecture, incorporate over-the-air (OTA) updates, integrated cockpit solutions, telematics and ADAS.”

RealVNC

“We provide the vehicle connectivity solutions that are essential for enabling drivers and passengers to stay connected and monitor their vehicles while on the road,” said Tom Blackie, VP of Automotive at RealVNC. “As long standing advocates of open standards, we look forward to contributing our telematics and connectivity expertise to Automotive Grade Linux so that the broader automotive ecosystem will be able to seamlessly integrate remote access and control.”

Telenav

“We are very excited to collaborate with Automotive Grade Linux and explore new applications for OpenStreetCam, our open platform for street-level imagery,” said Philipp Kandal, VP of Engineering and OSM at Telenav. “As a leading provider of location-based platform services, we also hope to apply our expertise to the AGL infotainment platform to provide all automakers with a robust navigation experience.”

Tuxera

“Cars are quickly becoming powerhouse producers of big data, and it’s important to have high-quality, reliable software to store, process and turn that data into valuable information,” said Szabolcs Szakacsits, President & CTO at Tuxera. “Collaborating with Automotive Grade Linux will enable us to ensure that car makers can store critical consumer and vehicle data safely.”

The full list of AGL members is available here.

About Automotive Grade Linux (AGL)

Automotive Grade Linux is a collaborative open source project that is bringing together automakers, suppliers and technologies to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open software stack for the connected car. With Linux at its core, AGL is developing an open platform from the ground up that can serve as the de facto industry standard to enable rapid development of new features and technologies. Although initially focused on In-Vehicle-Infotainment (IVI), AGL is the only organization planning to address all software in the vehicle, including instrument cluster, heads up display, telematics, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous driving. The AGL platform is available to all, and anyone can participate in its development. Learn more: https://www.automotivelinux.org/

Automotive Grade Linux is a Collaborative Project at The Linux Foundation. Linux Foundation Collaborative Projects are independently funded software projects that harness the power of collaborative development to fuel innovation across industries and ecosystems. www.linuxfoundation.org

Additional Resources

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Media Inquiries

Emily Olin

Automotive Grade Linux

eolin@linuxfoundation.org