New survey reveals why contributors work on open source projects and how much time they spend on security

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., December 8, 2020 – The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF) and the Laboratory for Innovation Science at Harvard (LISH) today announced the release of a new report, “Report on the 2020 FOSS Contributor Survey,” which details the findings of a contributor survey administered by the organizations and focused on how contributors engage with open source software. The research is part of an ongoing effort to study and identify ways to improve the security and sustainability of open source software.

The FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) contributor survey and report follow the Census II analysis released earlier this year. This combined pair of works represents important steps towards understanding and addressing structural and security complexities in the modern-day supply chain where open source is pervasive but not always understood. Census II identified the most commonly used free and open source software (FOSS) components in production applications, while the FOSS Contributor Survey and report shares findings directly from nearly 1,200 respondents working on them and other FOSS software.

“The modern economy – both digital and physical – is increasingly reliant on free and open source software,” said Frank Nagle, assistant professor at Harvard Business School. “Understanding FOSS contributor motivations and behavior is a key piece of ensuring the future security and sustainability of this critical infrastructure.”

Key findings from the FOSS Contributor Survey include:

  • The top three motivations for contributors are non-monetary. While the overwhelming majority of respondents (74.87 percent) are already employed full-time and more than half (51.65 percent) are specifically paid to develop FOSS, motivations to contribute focused on adding a needed feature or fix, enjoyment of learning and fulfilling a need for creative or enjoyable work.
  • There is a clear need to dedicate more effort to the security of FOSS, but the burden should not fall solely on contributors. Respondents report spending, on average, just 2.27 percent of their total contribution time on security and express little desire to increase that time. The report authors suggest alternative methods to incentivizing security-related efforts.
  • As more contributors are paid by their employer to contribute, stakeholders need to balance corporate and project interests. The survey revealed that nearly half (48.7 percent) of respondents are paid by their employer to contribute to FOSS, suggesting strong support for the stability and sustainability of open source projects but drawing into question what happens if corporate interest in a project diminishes or ceases.
  • Companies should continue the positive trend of corporate support for employees’ contribution to FOSS. More than 45.45 percent of respondents stated they are free to contribute to FOSS without asking permission, compared to 35.84 percent ten years ago. However, 17.48 percent of respondents say their companies have unclear policies on whether they can contribute and 5.59 percent were unaware of what  policies – if any – their employer had.

“Understanding open source contributor behaviors, especially as they relate to security, can help us better apply resources and attention to the world’s most-used software,” said David A. Wheeler, director of open source supply chain security at the Linux Foundation. “It is clear from the 2020 findings that we need to take steps to improve security without overburdening contributors and the findings suggest several ways to do that.”

For an in-depth analysis of these findings, suggested actions and more, please access the full report here: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/blog/2020/12/download-the-report-on-the-2020-foss-contributor-survey

The report authors are Frank Nagle, Harvard Business School; David A. Wheeler, the Linux Foundation; Hila Lifshitz-Assaf, New York University; and Haylee Ham and Jennifer L. Hoffman, Laboratory for Innovation Science at Harvard. They will host a webinar tomorrow, December 9, at 10 am ET. Please register here: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/webinar-why-wont-developers-write-secure-os-software/

The FOSS Contributor Report & Survey is expected to take place again in 2021. For contributors who would like to participate, please sign up here: https://hbs.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_erjkjzXJ2Eo0TDD

About the OpenSSF

Hosted by the Linux Foundation, the OpenSSF is a cross-industry organization that brings together the industry’s most important open source security initiatives and the individuals and companies that support them. It combines the Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII), founded in response to the 2014 Heartbleed bug, and the Open Source Security Coalition, founded by the GitHub Security Lab, to build a community to support the open source security for decades to come. The OpenSSF is committed to collaboration and working both upstream and with existing communities to advance open source security for all.

About LISH

As a university-wide initiative, the Laboratory for Innovation Science at Harvard (LISH) is spurring the development of a science of innovation through a systematic program of solving real-world innovation challenges while simultaneously conducting rigorous scientific research. To date, LISH has worked with key partners in aerospace and healthcare, such as NASA, the Harvard Medical School, the Broad Institute, and the Scripps Research Institute to solve complex problems and develop impactful solutions. More information can be found at https://lish.harvard.edu/

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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Media Contact
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Story Changes Culture
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Open Source Maintainers and community leaders will host virtual mentorship sessions designed to provide expert knowledge and valuable interactive discussion across a range of topics related to the Linux Kernel and other OS projects, primarily around development. These Mentorship Webinars are free for anyone to attend, and are being offered to support the development of skills and further empowerment of the community. 

SAN FRANCISCO, November 10, 2020The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, is launching a virtual mentoring series entitled LF Live: Mentorship Series.  The goal of this program is to (1) continue offering opportunities to learn and re-skill to those that have been displaced from jobs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic; (2) serve those considering jobs in open source by helping to grow their skills and build their network so they are better set up for successful careers; (3) grow the number of people entering the open source job market which has a huge demand for new talent; and (4) encourage new people to apply to The Linux Foundation’s Mentoring Program and other community mentoring programs. These webinars will be complimentary. There is no cost to participate in this program.

Each webinar topic will be different, but will primarily be technical and applicable to the Linux Kernel, as well as to other open source projects. The first webinar was held on October 29 and covered ‘Writing Change Logs that Make Sense, led by Shuah Khan, Kernel Maintainer & Fellow, The Linux Foundation. The recording of the session can be viewed here and the slides can be viewed here. Upcoming Mentorship Webinars include:

    • How Do I Get Started with an Open Source Project?, with Clyde Seepersad, SVP & General Manager, Training & Certification, The Linux Foundation – December 2
    • Best Practices to Getting Your Patches Accepted, with Greg Kroah-Hartman, Kernel Maintainer & Fellow, The Linux Foundation – December 8
    • Open Source Licensing, with Steve Winslow, Director of Strategic Programs, The Linux Foundation – January 13, 2021
    • Kselftest, with Shuah Khan, Kernel Maintainer & Fellow, The Linux Foundation – Date TBA
    • Best Practices to be an Effective Maintainer, with Dan Williams, Linux Kernel Developer, Intel – Date TBA
    • Static Analysis & Tools, with Jan-Simon Möller, AGL Release Manager, The Linux Foundation – Date TBA
    • Coccinelle, with Julia Lawall, Senior Researcher at Inria – Date TBA

Additional sessions will continue to be added, covering topics such as: Smatch (Static Analysis Tool), Dynamic Analysis and Tools, Fuzz Testing, Kunit, and Tracing. To be alerted when registration is live for each session, please subscribe at the bottom of this page: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/lf-live-mentorship-series/

To learn more about the LF Live: Mentorship Series, please visit our webpage. To learn more about the Linux Foundation Mentoring Program, please click here. To learn more about the Linux Foundation Events, visit our website and follow us on Twitter and Facebook for all the latest event updates and announcements.

 

About The Linux Foundation
The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation Events are where the world’s leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage.

Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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Media Contact:
Kristin O’Connell
The Linux Foundation
koconnell@linuxfoundation.org

Grillo is open sourcing ‘OpenEEW,’ its IoT-based earthquake early-warning system that will accelerate the creation of low-cost, community-driven projects around the world, with support from IBM, USAID, the Clinton Foundation and Arrow Electronics

San Francisco, Calif., Aug. 11, 2020 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it will host Grillo’s OpenEEW project in collaboration with IBM to accelerate the standardization and deployment of earthquake early-warning systems (EEWs) for earthquake preparedness around the world. The project includes the core components of the Grillo EEW system comprised of integrated capabilities to sense, detect and analyze earthquakes as well as alert communities. OpenEEW was created by Grillo with support from IBM, USAID, the Clinton Foundation and Arrow Electronics.

Earthquakes often have the most severe consequences in developing countries, due in part to construction and infrastructure issues. Timely alerts have the potential to help save lives in the communities where earthquakes pose the greatest threat. EEW systems provide public alerts in countries including Mexico, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan, but nearly three billion people globally live with the threat of an earthquake and don’t have access to nation-wide systems, which can cost upwards of one billion U.S. dollars. OpenEEW wants to help reduce the costs of EEW systems, accelerate their deployments around the world and has the potential to save many lives.

“The OpenEEW Project represents the very best in technology and in open source,” said Mike Dolan, Senior Vice President and GM of Projects at the Linux Foundation. “We’re pleased to be able to host and support such an important project and community at the Linux Foundation. The open source community can enable rapid development and deployment of these critical systems across the world.”

The OpenEEW Project includes several core IoT components: sensor hardware and firmware that can rapidly detect and transmit ground motion; real-time detection systems that can be deployed on various platforms from a Kubernetes cluster to a Raspberry Pi; and applications that allow users to receive alerts on hardware devices, wearables, or mobile apps as quickly as possible. The open source community aims to help advance earthquake technology by contributing to OpenEEW’s three integrated technology capabilities: deploying sensors, detecting earthquakes and sending alerts.

“For years we have seen that EEWs have only been possible with very significant governmental financing, due to the cost of dedicated infrastructure and development of algorithms. We expect that OpenEEW will reduce these barriers and work towards a future where everyone who lives in seismically-active areas can feel safe,” said Andres Meira, Founder, Grillo.

IBM and The Linux Foundation have a rich history of deploying projects that fundamentally make change and progress in society through innovation – and remain committed during COVID-19. The winner of the 2018 Call for Code Global Challenge, Project Owl, contributed its IoT device firmware in March 2020 as the ClusterDuck Protocol, and now, Grillo’s OpenEEW is the most recent project to be open sourced for communities that need them most.

Originally connected to Grillo through the Clinton Foundation at a convening of the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) Action Network, IBM is now playing a role supporting Grillo by adding the OpenEEW earthquake technology into the Call for Code deployment pipeline supported by The Linux Foundation.

IBM has deployed a set of six of Grillo’s earthquake sensor hardware and is conducting tests in Puerto Rico, complementing Grillo’s tools with a new Node-RED dashboard to visualize readings. IBM is also extending a Docker software version of the detection component that can be deployed to Kubernetes and Red Hat OpenShift on the IBM Cloud.

“IBM is thrilled to continue collaborating with Grillo and to contribute to the new open source OpenEEW project with The Linux Foundation,” said Daniel Krook, Chief Technology Officer, Call for Code. “Grillo technology has the potential to help save lives, which is just the type of innovation we look for in Call for Code projects. This is an exciting opportunity for the developer community to help us improve the software, hardware, and global network as an open source project.”

Grillo sensors have generated more than 1TB of data since 2017 in Mexico, Chile, Puerto Rico and Costa Rica, including information from large earthquakes of magnitudes 6 and 7. Researchers from Harvard University and the University of Oregon are already working with this data, which will enable new machine learning earthquake characterization and detection methods.

“Understanding the ground on which Mexico City is built is an important facet of earthquake hazards. With support from the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard University and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, we are working with Grillo to deploy a dense network of sensors across Mexico City and analyze the seismic behavior and local seismicity beneath the ancient lake basin. Our collaboration also enables open source software development for the next generation of seismology on the cloud,” said Harvard Professor Maine Denolle.

The primary aim of the project is to encourage a variety of people – makers, data scientists, entrepreneurs, seismologists – to build EEWs in places like Nepal, New Zealand, Ecuador, and other seismic regions. This community may also contribute to OpenEEW by advancing the sensor hardware design, improving detection and characterization of earthquakes through machine learning, and creating new methods for delivering alerts to citizens.

For more information and to begin contributing, please visit:

 

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,500 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

New collaboration called Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF) consolidates industry efforts to improve the security of open source software

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., Aug 3, 2020 – The Linux Foundation, today announced the formation of the Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF). The OpenSSF is a cross-industry collaboration that brings together leaders to improve the security of open source software (OSS) by building a broader community with targeted initiatives and best practices. It combines efforts from the Core Infrastructure Initiative, GitHub’s Open Source Security Coalition and other open source security work from founding governing board members GitHub, Google, IBM, JPMorgan Chase, Microsoft, NCC Group, OWASP Foundation and Red Hat, among others. Additional founding members include ElevenPaths, GitLab, HackerOne, Intel, Okta, Purdue, SAFECode, StackHawk, Trail of Bits, Uber and VMware.

Open source software has become pervasive in data centers, consumer devices and services, representing its value among technologists and businesses alike. Because of its development process, open source that ultimately reaches end users has a chain of contributors and dependencies. It is important that those responsible for their user or organization’s security are able to understand and verify the security of this dependency chain.

The OpenSSF brings together the industry’s most important open source security initiatives and the individuals and companies that support them. The Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII), founded in response to the 2014 Heartbleed bug, and the Open Source Security Coalition, founded by the GitHub Security Lab, are just a couple of the projects that will be brought together under the new OpenSSF. The Foundation’s governance, technical community and its decisions will be transparent, and any specifications and projects developed will be vendor agnostic. The OpenSSF is committed to collaboration and working both upstream and with existing communities to advance open source security for all.

“We believe open source is a public good and across every industry we have a responsibility to come together to improve and support the security of open source software we all depend on,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation. “Ensuring open source security is one of the most important things we can do, and it requires all of us around the world to assist in the effort. The OpenSSF will provide that forum for a truly collaborative, cross-industry effort.”

With the formalization of the group, the open governance structure is established and includes a Governing Board (GB), a Technical Advisory Council (TAC) and a separate oversight for each working group and project. OpenSSF intends to host a variety of open source technical initiatives to support security for the world’s most critical open source software, all of which will be done in the open on GitHub.

For more information and to contribute to the project, please visit https://openssf.org

Resources

Threats, Risks & Mitigations of the Open Source Ecosystem, Open Source Security Coalition
Vulnerabilities in the Core, Harvard’s Lab for Innovation Science and Linux Foundation
Red Hat Product Security Risk Report, Red Hat

Governing Board Member Quotes

GitHub
“Every industry is using open source software, and it is our collective responsibility to help maintain a healthy and secure ecosystem,” said Jamie Cool, Vice President of Product Management, Security at GitHub. “GitHub founded the Open Source Security Coalition in 2019 to bring together industry leaders around this mission and ensure the consumption of open source software is something that all developers can do with confidence. We look forward to this next step in the evolution of the coalition and serving as a founding member of the Open Source Security Foundation.”

Read more in GitHub’s blog.

Google
“Security is always top of mind for Google and our users. We have developed robust internal security tools and systems for consuming open source software internally, for our users, and for our OSS-based products. We believe in building safer products for everyone with far-reaching impacts, and we are excited to work with the broader community through the OpenSSF. We look forward to sharing our innovations and working together to improve the security of open source software we all depend on,” said Director of Product Security, Google Cloud, James Higgins.

IBM
“Open source has become mainstream in the enterprise. As such, the security of the open source supply-chain is of paramount importance to IBM and our clients,” said Christopher Ferris, IBM Fellow and CTO Open Technology. “The launch of the Open Source Security Foundation marks an important step towards giving open source communities the information and tools they need to improve their secure engineering practices, and the information developers need to choose their open source wisely.”

JPMorgan Chase
“Developing, growing and using open source software is a top priority for JPMorgan Chase. We are committed to partner with the community through the Open Source Security Foundation to ensure trust and security in open source software for everyone,” stated Lori Beer, Global Chief Information Officer, JPMorgan Chase.

Microsoft
“As open source is now core to nearly every company’s technology strategy, securing open source software is an essential part of securing the supply chain for every company, including our own,” said Mark Russinovich, Chief Technology Officer, Microsoft Azure. “As with everything open source, building better security is a community-driven process. All of us at Microsoft are excited to be a founding member of the Open Source Security Foundation and we look forward to partnering with the community to create new security solutions that will help us all.”

Read more in Microsoft’s blog.

NCC Group
“The security and privacy of the internet is essential for the protection of individuals, organizations and critical infrastructure, and also the future of democracy and our civil liberties. Given the fundamental role open source plays in powering our world, creating scalable resources and tools to help software maintainers, developers, and users understand and improve their projects’ security is a significant step toward a safer and more secure world. By bringing together a dedicated group of technologists with a shared desire to improve the security of open source software, together we can begin to remediate – or even prevent – security vulnerabilities at a scale not previously possible,” stated Jennifer Fernick, Head of Research at global cyber security expert NCC Group.”

OWASP
“Joining the Linux Foundation and the Open Source Security Foundation is central to our mission to advance the state of application security, especially as OpenSSF is already aligned with OWASP’s core philosophies of openness, transparency and innovation,” said Andrew van der Stock, Executive Director of OWASP, the Open Web Application Security Project. “We look forward to working with all of the participating organizations to improve the state of software security and work together on projects of vital interest to software developers, organizations, and governments around the world.”

Red Hat
“Red Hat is unrelenting in our commitment to open source and in participating to make upstream projects successful. We believe security is an essential part of healthy project communities,” said Chris Wright, CTO of Red Hat. “Now, more than ever, is the time for us to join together with other leaders to help ensure key projects are secure and consumable in our products, across enterprises, and as part of the hybrid cloud. We are excited to help found this Open Source Software Foundation.”

Additional Founding Member Quotes

ElevenPaths
“The security of an enterprise application or services depends mainly on the security of all its components. The vast majority of business applications and services are not fully developed in-house as they make use of open source components that help accelerate the development cycle and extend their functionality. Therefore, it is essential to ensure that all open source components comply with the best practices of secure development and periodic reviews are carried out to positively impact all software that makes use of these components. Joining the Open Source Security Foundation is fully aligned with our vision and principles.”

GitLab
“GitLab is excited to play a part in the creation of the Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF) to further cross-industry collaboration and move the security of open source projects forward as it is key to the future of technology,” said David DeSanto, director of product for Secure and Defend at GitLab. “Aligning with GitLab’s mission of ‘everyone can contribute,’ we look forward to supporting and contributing to the community to bring together security-conscious developers to change open source development in a collaborative and fundamental way.”

HackerOne
“Open source software powers HackerOne,” said Reed Loden, Head of Open Source Security, HackerOne. “It powers our software, our infrastructure, and our model for engaging with our community. As part of our mission to make the internet safer, we want to make it easier for open source projects to remain secure. For over three years, we’ve given the open source community our platform for free, and we’ve been long-time supporters of initiatives like Internet Bug Bounty. Joining the Linux Foundation and the Open Source Security Foundation allows us to continue on our mission and make the internet safer alongside some of the foremost visionaries in security. We look forward to seeing the change we can make together.”

Intel
“It takes the industry working together to advance technology and accelerate open source security initiatives. Hardware and software are inextricably linked to deliver security, transparency and trust in open source software. Together with the OpenSSF, Intel will continue to play a key role in mobilizing the industry at large and solving security challenges from the cloud to the edge,” said Anand Pashupathy, GM of System Security Software, Intel.

SAFECode
“Open source software is a major component in today’s software supply chain and thus comprises a significant fraction of the software that individuals and organizations rely upon. Supporting the secure development of open source software is of critical importance to SAFECode members and the software community,” said Steve Lipner, executive director of SAFECode. “We are looking forward to bringing our software security experience to bear as we participate in the Open Source Security Foundation’s mission to build a collaborative, cross-industry community to support the security of open source software.”

StackHawk
“The use of open source has undoubtedly reached critical mass, with ever increasing dependency trees and software complexity. Equipping engineering teams to deliver secure applications simply and scalably is core to our mission at StackHawk. We are excited to be one of the founding members of the Open Source Security Foundation to ensure that this can be a reality across software development as a whole and look forward to continued partnership with the community,” said StackHawk’s Founder & CEO, Joni Klippert.

Uber
“Security and Privacy is always top of mind at Uber to ensure we are responsible stewards of our user’s data. We’re always focused on mitigating all types of software vulnerabilities and as such the security of open source software is a top priority. Historically, we’ve worked with other industry leaders to help build a strong security community around open source software and we are excited to expand those efforts with the OpenSSF,” said Rob Fletcher, Sr Manager, Security Engineering.

VMware
“Strengthening the security posture, policies, and processes in the open source community and in widely used open source projects is strengthening the whole software ecosystem – for all players,” said Joshua Lock, security tech lead, Open Source Technology Center, VMware. “VMware strongly supports the goal of making our software ecosystem more resilient and more secure.”

 

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact
Jennifer Cloer
reTHINKit Media
503-867-2304
jennifer@rethinkitmedia.com

FinOps Foundation is becoming a Linux Foundation effort to increase education and best practices for emerging FinOps discipline; new edX course provides foundation for education and community growth

San Francisco, Calif., June 29, 2020 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the intent to host the FinOps Foundation to advance the discipline of FinOps through best practices, education, and standards.

The FinOps Foundation includes 1,500 individual members across the globe, representing more than 500 companies with more than $1 billion in revenue each. In the same way that DevOps revolutionized development by breaking down silos and increasing agility, FinOps increases the business value of cloud by bringing together technology, business and finance professionals with a new cultural set, knowledge skills and technical processes. Companies represented among membership include Atlassian, Autodesk, Bill.com, HERE Technologies, LiveRamp, Just Eat, Nationwide, Neustar, Nike, and Spotify, among others. To become a member and contribute to this work, please visit: https://www.finops.org/

“Where there is technology disruption, there is opportunity for business transformation. FinOps is exactly this and represents a shift in operations strategy, process, and culture,” said Mike Dolan, vice president and general manager, Linux Foundation Projects. “This type of disruption and transformation is also where community and industry-wide collaboration play critical roles in enabling a whole new market opportunity. We’re pleased to be the place where that work can happen.”

The FinOps community is defining cloud financial management standards and is increasing access to education and certification for this discipline across industries. As part of this effort, the Linux Foundation is announcing a new, free edX course, Introduction to FinOps, to advance education and knowledge in this emerging area and to cultivate a growing community of professionals. This introductory course will cover the basics of FinOps and how it can positively impact an organization by building a culture of accountability around cloud use that helps companies make good, timely, data-backed decisions in the cloud. The course is open for enrollment now, and content will be available to begin on the edX platform July 21.

The FinOps Foundation is offering the FinOps Certified Practitioner Exam (FOCP) through the Linux Foundation, and more training and certification programs are expected later this year. Follow @LF_Training on Twitter or watch https://training.linuxfoundation.org for more information and updates.

“Technology and business leaders are seeking support for understanding how to manage cloud technologies and spending across their enterprises and the FinOps Foundation brings to bear the resources required to enable them to innovate inside their companies,” said J.R. Storment, executive director of the FinOps Foundation. “With the Linux Foundation’s support, especially across its world-class training organization, we can serve this growing community.”

FinOps is the operating model for the cloud, which is resulting in a shift that combines systems, best practices, and culture to increase an organization’s ability to understand cloud costs and make informed business decisions. FinOps ensures that companies get the most value from every dollar spent in the cloud. It pushes accountability for spending to the edge where developers control purchasing decisions, and provides a new set of centralized processes to maximize efficiency of purchases and the ability to allocate spending to teams.

Cloud spending is forecast to exceed $360B by 2022, according to research firm Gartner, but finance teams have very little insight into where that spend is being allocated within their organizations. The result is uncontrolled costs that aren’t properly forecast or documented along with lack of standardized tooling, which can lead to major losses or errors in critical accounting practices. Procurement of IT infrastructure has moved from taking days or weeks to seconds or minutes, which has dramatically accelerated application development but dramatically decreased efficiencies in financial operations.

“As the cloud native movement deepens inside organizations large and small, understanding how to optimize the infrastructure footprint through cultural change and engineering practices is critical,” said Chris Aniszczyk, CTO, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). “CNCF welcomes the FinOps Foundation to the Linux Foundation and we look forward to collaborating across communities to improve cloud financial management for all.”

Supporting Quotes

Atlassian

“The FinOps Foundation has helped us validate and grow our cloud financial management practices. Having the FinOps Foundation join the Linux Foundation is a great opportunity to see this community continue to develop FinOps practices from which we all benefit,” said Simon Beckett, team lead, Atlassian Cloud FinOps.

 Nationwide

“As enterprises leverage public cloud providers, speed of development is increasing and also a risk of out of control costs.  FinOps provides a framework that brings together IT, Finance and Procurement teams and gives them a common language and processes that helps keep costs under control and keeps the focus on delivering business value. My team and I have connected with peers in the industry to get their insights and perspectives on common problems and to see what is coming next.  In addition there are opportunities for training and certification to take advantage of,” said Joseph Daly, director of cloud optimization, Nationwide.

Pearson

“Pearson joined the FinOps Foundation in Feb 2019 as we launched our global team internally. Since then we have leveraged resources from the F2 membership calls, networked within Slack with other practitioners and been able to present back to the share many of our lessons learned along this journey.  Being an education company it’s critical we are always learning. Early 2020, Pearson was able to do a private workshop with the foundation where all 8 of our team members attended the 8 hour workshop and successfully received certification. We immediately leveraged discussions in the workshop and started building our 2020 roadmap. We began mapping our milestones to the F2 principals and using the “crawl, walk, run” approach. The FinOps Foundation has personally helped me connect with many other practitioners that are very mature in Cloud Financial Management process and allowed me to bring best practices and automation ideas back to Pearson to implement, said Ashley Hromatko, senior cloud FinOps manager, Pearson.

 

About the FinOps Foundation

The FinOps Foundation (F2) is a nonprofit trade association made up of FinOps practitioners around the world. Grounded in real world stories, expertise and inspiration for and by FinOps practitioners, the F2 is focused on codifying and promoting cloud financial management best practices and standards to help community members and their teams become better at cloud financial management. For more information or to join, please visit: https://www.finops.org/

 About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,500 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

 

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact
Jennifer Cloer
reTHINKit Media
503-867-2304
jennifer@rethinkitmedia.com

First End-to-End Machine Learning Platform Is Embraced by the Community with over 2 Million Downloads Per Month and over 200 Contributors in Only 2 Years

San Francisco, JUNE 25, 2020 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced that MLflow, an open source machine learning (ML) platform created by Databricks, will join the Linux Foundation. Since its introduction at Spark + AI Summit two years ago, MLflow has experienced impressive community engagement from over 200 contributors and is downloaded more than 2 million times per month, with a 4x annual growth rate in downloads. The Linux Foundation provides a vendor neutral home with an open governance model to broaden adoption and contributions to the MLflow project even further.

“The steady increase in community engagement shows the commitment data teams have to building the machine learning platform of the future. The rate of adoption demonstrates the need for an open source approach to standardizing the machine learning lifecycle,” said Michael Dolan, VP of Strategic Programs at the Linux Foundation. “Our experience in working with the largest open source projects in the world shows that an open governance model allows for faster innovation and adoption through broad industry contribution and consensus building.”

Databricks created MLflow in response to the complicated process of ML model development. Traditionally, the process to build, train, tune, deploy, and manage machine models was extremely difficult for data scientists and developers. Unlike traditional software development that is only concerned with versions of code, ML models need to also track versions of data sets, model parameters, and algorithms, which creates an exponentially larger set of variables to track and manage. In addition, ML is very iterative and relies on close collaboration between data teams and application teams. MLflow keeps this process from becoming overwhelming by providing a platform to manage the end-to-end ML development lifecycle from data preparation to production deployment, including experiment tracking, packaging code into reproducible runs, and model sharing and collaboration.

Matei Zaharia, the original creator of Apache Spark and creator of MLflow, shared the news with the data community during his keynote presentation today at Spark + AI Summit. “MLflow has become the open source standard for machine learning platforms because of the community of contributors, which consists of hundreds of engineers from over a hundred companies. Machine learning is transforming all major industries and driving billions of decisions in retail, finance, and health care. Our move to contribute MLflow to the Linux Foundation is an invitation to the machine learning community to  incorporate the best practices for ML engineering into a standard platform that is open, collaborative, and end-to-end.“

Organizations are presenting their experience with MLflow at Spark+ AI Summit, including Starbucks, Exxonmobil, T-Mobile and Accenture. New features that continue to simplify MLflow and the ML lifecycle are also being announced today, including autologging for experiments, and enhanced model management and deployment in the MLflow model registry.

Spark + AI Summit is taking place virtually this week, offering free registration and access to keynotes, sessions and industry forums on-demand. Register and learn more about MLflow or visit MLflow.org.

 

About The Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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Jennifer Cloer
ReTHINKitMedia
jennifer@rethinkitmedia.com
503-867-2304

Program will support hundreds of displaced developer interns across diverse set of open source projects and communities

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. – April 23, 2020– The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it’s expanding its Mentorship Program in response to COVID-19 with seed funding from Intel. The Program will grow to support interns who have been displaced as a result of the global pandemic and to give individuals an opportunity to reskill for some of the most sought-after, highly paid careers in the world.

Intel is leading funding for this expansion with a $250,000 commitment. The Linux Foundation is investing an additional $100,000 and is calling on leaders throughout the industry to match this support in order to provide opportunities to aspiring technical talent during these unprecedented times.

“During these challenging times, our ability to come together to help cultivate the next generation of software developers is more important than ever,” said Melissa Evers-Hood, vice president at Intel. “The Linux Foundation’s Community Bridge program will engage the community building mission-critical applications and Intel is proud to support developers as they participate in this initiative.”

The Linux Foundation Mentorship Program is designed to enable developers to experiment, learn and contribute to open source communities while strengthening open source projects and building an increasingly skilled and diverse talent pool of developers. Job placements as a result of the program are common and have included interns taking positions at leading technologies companies that include Intel, Google, Red Hat, IBM and more.

“Our commitment today and always is to protect the health and safety of our communities and staff and support the ongoing needs required to continue building the world’s most critical software infrastructure,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at the Linux Foundation. “One of the ways we can do that is to ensure the rising stars from throughout the developer community can learn, grow and contribute no matter the circumstances.”

The Mentorship Program offers interns and mentees the opportunity to work on some of the world’s most popular open source projects, including Linux, Kubernetes, LF Networking and Hyperledger, among others. Mentors of the Program have included key developers from the world’s largest open-source software initiatives. Mentees enhance their technical skills while learning the open-source culture and collaboration norms, including tools and infrastructure.

Due to this unprecedented moment for those who have been displaced from internships or full-time employment, the Linux Foundation’s expanded Mentorship Program will accept applications and conduct enrollments on a rolling basis. To apply, please visit: https://communitybridge.org

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact
Jennifer Cloer
reTHINKit Media
for Linux Foundation
503-867-2304
jennifer@rethinkitmedia.com

Under the Linux Foundation, FINOS will provide a forum for industry-wide collaboration among the world’s biggest financial services firms and tech companies on fintech projects addressing desktop interoperability, data modeling, compliance and more

San Francisco, April 9th, 2020 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open collaboration, and the Fintech Open Source Foundation (FINOS), a nonprofit whose mission is to accelerate adoption of open source software, standards and best practices in financial services, today announced that FINOS will become a Linux Foundation organization. To enable this effort, the Linux Foundation has agreed to acquire the FINOS operating assets.

The Linux Foundation will position FINOS as its umbrella project through which to advance further development of open source and standards within the financial services industry. The FINOS team, led by Executive Director Gabriele Columbro, will join the Linux Foundation. Columbro will continue in his role.

The financial services industry has a long history of open source adoption, having been among the earliest industries to embrace Linux. Since then, both large and small fintech firms have been leveraging open source to innovate on new technologies, ranging from cloud computing to decentralized networks and blockchain to machine learning and artificial intelligence. FINOS has been instrumental in bringing key industry stakeholders together around open source contribution and will be empowered now to expand and accelerate that work through the global open source community and Linux Foundation’s services and resources.

“In less than two years FINOS has become the go-to foundation for open source collaboration in financial services. With this sector’s focus on technology-driven solutions, we feel the time is right to bring our two communities together to enable the next stage of innovation for our projects,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at the Linux Foundation. “We look forward to working with Gab, the FINOS team and its members as we together chart the future of global financial services collaboration.”

“FINOS has achieved tremendous growth across our project portfolio thanks to our 35 members and wider community,” explained Gabriele Columbro. “The FINOS community’s passion and dedication to applying open source practices to address concrete, pressing topics — in areas such as cloud computing, financial modeling, desktop interoperability, messaging, tooling, and data technology — has established the transformative potential of open source within financial services. We are thrilled to join forces with the Linux Foundation to accelerate this growth and welcome an even more diverse set of members and projects under the FINOS umbrella.”

“Open source technology is essential to the future of the financial services industry,” said Alejandra Villagra, FINOS chairperson, Citigroup. “With FINOS becoming part of the Linux Foundation, we can leverage a wider network of resources and further accelerate collaboration that delivers technology solutions to common business issues and industry challenges, shaping the future technology landscape.”

“Over the last few years, FINOS successfully created a community of buy-side, sell-side, fintech and tech companies who work together on a wide range of open source projects and standards,” said Dov Katz, FINOS vice chairperson and distinguished engineer at Morgan Stanley. “Joining the Linux Foundation will extend our pool of partners, talented developers and engineers dedicated to solving similar problems, and will help the community innovate even faster.”

“The global financial community benefits when data and technology can be combined through shared standards,” said Robert Coletti, head of desktop platform, Refinitiv. “We look forward to continued engagement with FINOS and the new opportunities that being part of the Linux Foundation will provide.”

“As a strategic open source partner for financial services firms, we work closely with FINOS and its members to drive open source adoption and best practices within the financial services industry,” said Andrew Aitken, general manager and global open source practice leader, Wipro Limited. “We know that open source plays a critical role in accelerating a bank’s enterprise transformation journey and believe that closer ties with Linux Foundation will help FINOS make inroads even faster.”

Financial services organizations have been rapid adopters of new technology, including large amounts of open source, which they have used to extend market reach and create client value. It is increasingly important for firms to look at enterprise open source and its ability to foster innovation while maintaining stability,” said Chris Wright, senior vice president and chief technology officer, Red Hat. “As active members of the Linux Foundation we see the immense potential this collaboration has to benefit the financial services industry as they adapt to an evolving technology landscape.”

FINOS is a diverse community of developers, financial and technology industry leaders committed to making contributions that will enable open source to flourish in financial services. Having grown rapidly over the last two years, the community today boasts more than 30 member organizations, 300+ contributors and many open source projects delivering value to participants across the industry.

About The Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

About FINOS

The Fintech Open Source Foundation (FINOS) is an independent membership organization whose purpose is to accelerate collaboration and innovation in financial services through the adoption of open source software, standards and best practices. FINOS believes that global financial organizations that embrace open source software, together with common standards, will be best positioned to capture the growth opportunities presented by a quickly evolving technological landscape. FINOS has 11 programs driven by more than 30 financial services and technology members, 300+ community contributors and over 75 open source repositories. We enable collaboration in key areas of innovation for the industry including data, cloud, interoperability, and decentralized technologies. FINOS is a 501(c)(6) and is based in Burlingame, CA with offices in New York, NY and London, England. For more information, visit www.finos.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact
Jennier Cloer
ReTHINKitMedia
jennier@rethinkitmedia.com
503-867-2304

seL4 foundation aims to accelerate the security, safety and reliability of any software system

San Francisco, April 7, 2020 –  The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it will host the seL4 Foundation, the nonprofit organization established by Data61, the digital specialist arm for Australia’s national science agency CSIRO. The seL4 microkernel is the world’s first operating system (OS) kernel that is proved secure; it is designed to ensure the security, safety and reliability of real-world critical computer systems.

The new Foundation aims to accelerate the development of seL4 and related technologies, and under the Linux Foundation will provide a global, independent and neutral organization for funding and steering the future evolution of seL4. Founding members include Cog Systems, DornerWorks, Ghost Locomotion, HENSOLD Cyber and UNSW Sydney.

The trustworthiness of embedded computing systems is vital to improving the security of critical systems around the world to safeguard them from cyber threats. This is particularly paramount in industries including avionics, autonomous vehicles, medical devices, critical infrastructure and defense.  The seL4 microkernel is the world’s first operating system with a proof of implementation correctness and presents an unparalleled combination of assurance, generality and performance, making it an ideal base for building security- and safety-critical systems. The seL4 Foundation provides a forum for developers to collaborate on growing and integrating the seL4 ecosystem.

“The Linux Foundation will support the seL4 Foundation and community by providing expertise and services to increase community engagement, contributors and adopters, helping to take the OS ecosystem to the next level,” said Michael Dolan, VP of strategic programs, the Linux Foundation. “The open governance and standards-based model will provide a neutral, mature and trustworthy framework to help advance an operating system that is readily deployable and optimized for security.”

Dr June Andronick, Leader of Trustworthy Systems at CSIRO’s Data61 said, “We are very excited about this step to provide a sustainable, long-term trajectory for seL4, and very keen to see the seL4 Foundation grow and thrive under the Linux Foundation umbrella.”

“With the help of the Linux Foundation we can broaden the community of contributors as well as adopters of seL4,” said UNSW Scientia Professor Gernot Heiser, Chair of the new Foundation. “This will provide the support that allows us to continue the research that ensures seL4 will remain the most advanced and secure OS technology.”

For more information on the seL4 Foundation visit https://sel4.systems/Foundation/

Supporting Quotes

Cog Systems

“seL4 has set the new standard for high assurance for embedded solutions on connected devices,” said Carl L. Nerup, CEO of Cog Systems, Inc. “This enables us to deliver commercial solutions that meet the rigorous demands associated with formal verification to deliver a certified approach that meet the highest standard for safety & security in the market today.”

 DornerWorks

“The seL4 proof provides a secure foundation to answer the growing need for cyber-security.  By joining the seL4 Foundation, DornerWorks can do more to help accelerate customer adoption of seL4 as the trusted software base for their embedded products.  We’re looking forward to the future of seL4 kernel and tool development,” said Gregg Wildes, Innovation Leader and Partnership Manager, DornerWorks Ltd.

Ghost Locomotion

“Ghost is a self-driving system that integrates seamlessly into your current car. Designed to be safer than a human driver, Ghost will give you the power to fully disengage on the highway and focus on what matters to you. Nowhere is the pursuit of perfection more important than our highways and we are proud to join the seL4 community to make provably correct, safety-critical systems a reality for millions of daily commuters,” said Dr Daniel Potts, Ghost Locomotion Inc.

 HENSOLDT Cyber

“We strongly believe in the benefits of open source software for critical IT systems in order to foster the development of one of the most important security assets,” said Sascha Kegreiß, CTO of HENSOLDT Cyber. “We provide our expertise to a community, which uses combined forces of different professionals from all over the world to strengthen the development of seL4. we were excited to become part of the seL4 Foundation.”

John Launchbury

“In system security, seL4 is one-of-a-kind. COVID-19 has taught us all the value of “distancing” in keeping any kind of system healthy and secure. That’s what microkernels like seL4 do for software. What makes seL4 unique is that we know with mathematical certainty that the seL4 code implements its “distancing” specification with ZERO functionality bugs. That it does so without a performance hit is doubly astonishing. I am eagerly anticipating seeing more and more system builders incorporate it to increase their digital security, and I’m confident that the seL4 foundation has been well structured to be effective in curating the ongoing open source development of seL4,” said John Launchbury, Galois, Formerly DARPA I2O Director.

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

Media Contacts

Beth Handoll
ReTHINKitMedia
beth@rethinkitmedia.com
+1 415 535 8658

Developers can help extend Project OWL’s reach by leveraging new open source technology to build mesh network nodes for emergency communications networks globally 

Lake Tahoe, Calif.,  March 10, 2020 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced Project OWL’s IoT device firmware effort will be hosted at the Foundation and is inviting developers worldwide to build mesh network nodes for global emergency communications networks. Project OWL, the winner of Call for Code 2018, is a cloud-based analytics tool that helps facilitate organization, whereabouts, and logistics for disaster response. The Linux Foundation’s open governance model will enable a global network of developers to accelerate the development of the mesh networks, which could help save lives following a natural disaster.

Project OWL (Organization, Whereabouts, and Logistics) has developed mesh network of Internet of Things (IoT) devices called “DuckLinks” that can be deployed or activated in disaster areas to quickly reestablish connectivity and improve communication between first responders and civilians in need. A central portal connects to solar- and battery-powered water resistant ‘DuckLinks’ that are placed in the field to generate a Local Area Network (LAN) using a Wi-Fi captive portal powered by low frequency Long-range Radio (LoRa) connectivity. These DuckLinks provide an emergency network to all mobile devices in their perimeter, instructing people how to connect to an emergency response portal. First responders can also use analytics and data sources to build a dashboard and formulate an action plan, such as coordinating resources, learning about weather patterns, and communicating with civilians who would otherwise be cut off.

Project OWL envisions the nodes creating large-scale communications networks in the wake of natural disasters. The open source release of OWL’s firmware can quickly turn a cheap wireless device into a DuckLink, a mesh network node capable of connecting to any other Ducks physically around it. This release marks a significant milestone putting the ClusterDuck Protocol into the hands of global developers. This is a starting point to even larger efforts in communities around the world to provide communications where infrastructure is degraded or nonexistent.

“Becoming part of The Linux Foundation community is a huge boost in accelerating our goal to better prepare communities and mitigate impact when hurricanes, floods or earthquakes strike. We want to challenge developers to build mesh network nodes for global emergency communications networks leveraging our newly open-sourced IoT firmware,” said Bryan Knouse, Co-Founder of Project OWL.

“When developing technologies that can have a direct impact on human life, it’s more important than ever to bring the largest possible global community of developers together working with an open governance model,” said Michael Dolan, VP of Strategic Programs at The Linux Foundation. “Project OWL’s technology solution is providing better information and analytics and enabling quicker distribution of resources and care where and when it’s needed most. We’re proud to support such a worthy cause.”

“As a developer, I am excited Project OWL’s firmware is open source and not just a hardware-software product. OWL has become a global movement that anyone from anywhere on the planet can join, contribute and address global issues,” said Vikas Singh, India-based open source developer.

In 2018, Project OWL emerged as the global winner in the inaugural Call for Code Global Challenge, competing with more than 100,000 participants from 156 nations. The Call for Code Global Challenge encourages and fosters the creation of practical applications built on open source software. The goal is to employ technology in new ways that can make an immediate and lasting humanitarian impact in communities around the world. Since winning in 2018, Project Owl has been fortified, tested, and deployed through IBM Code and Response, a $25 million, four-year deployment initiative to put open source technologies in the communities where they are needed most.

“Project OWL was our first Call for Code winner that went through the Code and Response incubation process, and we’re excited to see this solution grow closer to reality,” said Daniel Krook, IBM Chief Technology Officer for Call for Code and Code and Response. “We were impressed with their combination of a complete software and hardware open source solution, utilizing an AI-powered disaster coordination platform paired with a robust communication network to reach people when connections are down. IBM is committed to using the power of our network and technical know-how to alleviate suffering from climate change and natural disasters, and we’re thrilled to have the support of The Linux Foundation as we deploy the project globally.”

In March 2019, Project OWL and IBM took on a large-scale pilot trip to Puerto Rico, deploying over 63 ducks each covering two square miles. This was followed by two additional pilots in the west and southeast of the island, engaging with local students, businesses, government representatives, and first responders. OWL currently has 30 permanent, solar-powered devices deployed across Puerto Rico in areas that are vulnerable to earthquakes, flooding, fire or other weather conditions.

Resources:

Code and Response™ with The Linux Foundation: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/projects/code-and-response/

Contribute on GitHub: https://github.com/Code-and-Response/ClusterDuck-Protocol

Learn more about the ClusterDuck Protocol: http://clusterduckprotocol.org/

 

About Call for Code

Developers have revolutionized the way people live and interact with virtually everyone and everything. Where most people see challenges, developers see possibilities. That’s why David Clark Cause created and launched Call for Code in 2018 alongside Founding Partner IBM. This five-year, $30 million global initiative is a rallying cry to developers to use their skills and mastery of the latest technologies, and to create new ones, to drive positive and long-lasting change across the world with their code. Call for Code global winning solutions, among others, are further developed and deployed via the IBM Code and Response initiative.

About The Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. The Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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Media Contacts

Beth Handoll

ReTHINKitMedia

beth@rethinkitmedia.com

+1 415 535 8658