The Linux Foundation is pleased to announce the release of the CDLA-Permissive-2.0 license agreement, which is now available on the CDLA website at https://cdla.dev/permissive-2-0/. We believe that CDLA-Permissive-2.0 will meet a genuine need for a short, simple, and broadly permissive license agreement to enable wider sharing and usage of open data, particularly to bring clarity to the use of open data for artificial intelligence and machine learning models. 

We’re happy to announce that IBM and Microsoft are making data sets available today using CDLA-Permissive-2.0.

In this blog post, we’ll share some background about the original versions of the Community Data License Agreement (CDLA), why we worked with the community to develop the new CDLA-Permissive-2.0 agreement, and why we think it will benefit producers, users, and redistributors of open data sets.

Background: Why would you need an open data license agreement?

Licenses and license agreements are legal documents that define how content can be used, modified, and shared. They operate within the legal frameworks for copyrights, patents, and other rights that are established by laws and regulations around the world. These laws and regulations are not always clear and are not always in sync with one another.

Decades of practice have established a collection of open source software licenses and open content licenses that are widely used. These licenses typically work within the frameworks established by laws and regulations mentioned above to permit broad use, modification, and sharing of software and other copyrightable content in exchange for following the license requirements.

Open data is different. Various laws and regulations treat data differently from software or other creative content. Depending on what the data is and which country’s laws you’re looking at, the data often may not be subject to copyright protection, or it might be subject to different laws specific to databases, i.e., sui generis database rights in the European Union. 

Additionally, data may be consumed, transformed, and incorporated into Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) models in ways that are different from how software and other creative content are used. Because of all of this, assumptions made in commonly-used licenses for software and creative content might not apply in expected ways to open data.

Choice is often a good thing, but too many choices can be problematic. To be clear, there are other licenses in use today for open data use cases. In particular, licenses and instruments from Creative Commons (such as CC-BY-4.0 and CC0-1.0) are used to share data sets and creative content. It was also important in drafting the CDLA agreements to enable collaboration with similar licenses. The CDLA agreements are in no way meant as a criticism of those alternatives, but rather the CDLA agreements are focused on addressing newer concerns born out of AI and ML use cases. AI and ML models generated from open data are the primary use case organizations have struggled with — CDLA was designed to address those concerns. Our goal was to strike a balance between updated choices and too many options.

First steps: CDLA version 1.0

Several years ago, in talking with members of the Linux Foundation member counsel community, we began collaborating to develop a license agreement that would clearly enable use, modification, and open data sharing, with a particular eye to AI and ML applications.

In October 2017, The Linux Foundation launched version 1.0 of the CDLA. The CDLA was intended to provide clear and explicit rights for recipients of data under CDLA to use, share and modify the data for any purpose. Importantly, it also explicitly permitted using the results from analyzed data to create AI and ML models, without any of the obligations that apply under the CDLA to sharing the data itself. It was launched with two initial types: a Permissive variant, with attribution-style obligations, and a Sharing variant, with a “copyleft”-style reciprocal commitment when resharing the raw data.

The CDLA-Permissive-1.0 agreement saw some amount of uptake and use. However, subsequent feedback revealed that some potential licensors and users of data under the CDLA-Permissive-1.0 agreement found it to be overly complex for non-lawyers to use. Many of its provisions were targeted at addressing specific and nuanced considerations for open data under various legal frameworks. While these considerations were worthwhile, we saw that communities may balance that specificity and clarity against the value of a concise set of easily comprehensible terms to lawyers and non-lawyers alike.

Partly in response to this, in 2019, Microsoft launched the Open Use of Data Agreement (O-UDA-1.0) to provide a more concise and simplified set of terms around the sharing and use of data for similar purposes. Microsoft graciously contributed stewardship of the O-UDA-1.0 to the CDLA effort. Given the overlapping scope of the O-UDA-1.0 and the CDLA-Permissive-1.0, we saw an opportunity to converge on a new draft for a CDLA-Permissive-2.0. 

Moving to version 2.0: Simplifying, clarifying, and making it easier

Following conversations with various stakeholders and after a review and feedback period with the Linux Foundation Member Counsel community, we have prepared and released CDLA-Permissive-2.0

In response to perceptions of CDLA-Permissive-1.0 as overly complex, CDLA-Permissive-2.0 is short and uses plain language to express the grant of permissions and requirements. Like version 1.0, the version 2.0 agreement maintains the clear rights to use, share and modify the data, as well as to use without restriction any “Results” generated through computational analysis of the data.

Unlike version 1.0, the new CDLA-Permissive-2.0 is less than a page in length.

  • The only obligation it imposes when sharing data is to “make available the text of this agreement with the shared Data,” including the disclaimer of warranties and liability. 

In a sense, you might compare its general “character” to that of the simpler permissive open source licenses, such as the MIT or BSD-2-Clause licenses, albeit specific to data (and with even more limited obligations).

One key point of feedback from users of the license and lawyers from organizations involved in Open Data were the challenges involved with associating attribution information with data (or versions of data sets). 

Although “attribution-style” provisions may be common in permissive open source software licenses, there was feedback that:

  • As data technologies continue to evolve beyond what the CDLA drafters might anticipate today, it is unclear whether typical ways of sharing attributions for open source software will fit well with open data sharing. 
  • Removing this as a mandated requirement was seen as preferable.

Recipients of Data under CDLA-Permissive-2.0 may still choose to provide attribution about the data sources. Attribution will often be important for appropriate norms in communities, and understanding its origination source is often a key aspect of why an open data set will have value. The CDLA-Permissive-2.0 simply does not make it a condition of sharing data.

CDLA-Permissive-2.0 also removes some of the more confusing terms that we’ve learned were just simply unnecessary or not useful in the context of an open data collaboration. Removing these terms enables the CDLA-Permissive-2.0 to present the terms in a concise, easy to read format that we believe will be appreciated by data scientists, AI/ML users, lawyers, and users around the world where English is not a first language.

We hope and anticipate that open data communities will find it easy to adopt it for releases of their own data sets.

Voices from the Community

“The open source licensing and collaboration model has made AI accessible to everyone, and formalized a two-way street for organizations to use and contribute to projects with others helping accelerate applied AI research. CDLA-Permissive-2.0 is a major milestone in achieving that type of success in the Data domain, providing an open source license specific to data that enables access, sharing and using data among individuals and organizations. The LF AI & Data community appreciates the clarity and simplicity CDLA-Permissive-2.0 provides.” Dr. Ibrahim Haddad, Executive Director of LF AI & Data 

“We appreciate the simplicity of the CDLA-Permissive-2.0, and we appreciate the community ensuring compatibility with Creative Commons licensed data sets.” Catherine Stihler, CEO of Creative Commons

“IBM has been at the forefront of innovation in open data sets for some time and as a founding member of the Community Data License Agreement. We have created a rich collection of open data sets on our Data Asset eXchange that will now utilize the new CDLAv2, including the recent addition of CodeNet – a 14-million-sample dataset to develop machine learning models that can help in programming tasks.” Ruchir Puri, IBM Fellow, Chief Scientist, IBM Research

“Sharing and collaborating with open data should be painless – and sharing agreements should be easy to understand and apply. We applaud the clear and understandable approach in the new CDLA-Permissive-2.0 agreement.” Jennifer Yokoyama, Vice President and Chief IP Counsel, Microsoft

“It’s exciting to see communities of legal and AI/ML experts come together to work on cross-organizational challenges to develop a framework to support data collaboration and sharing.” Nithya Ruff, Chair of the Board, The Linux Foundation and Executive Director, Open Source Program Office, Comcast

“Data is an essential component of how companies build their operations today, particularly around Open Data sets that are available for public use. At OpenUK, we welcome the CDLA-Permissive-2.0 license as a tool to make Open Data more available and more manageable over time, which will be key to addressing the challenges that organisations have coming up. This new approach will make it easier to collaborate around Open Data and we hope to use it in our upcoming work in this space.” Amanda Brock, CEO of OpenUK

“Verizon supports community efforts to develop clear and scalable solutions to legal issues around building artificial intelligence and machine learning, and we welcome the CDLA-Permissive-2.0 as a mechanism for data providers and software developers to work together in building new technology.” Meghna Sinha, VP – AI Center, Verizon

“Sony believes that the spread of clear and simple Open Data licenses like CDLA-2.0 activates Open Data ecosystem and contributes to innovation with AI. We support CDLA’s effort and hope CDLA will be used widely.” Hisashi Tamai, SVP, Sony Group Corporation

Data Sets Available under CDLA-Permissive-2.0

With today’s release of CDLA-Permissive-2.0, we are also pleased to announce several data sets that are now available under the new agreement. 

The IBM Center for Open Source Data and AI Technologies (CODAIT) will begin to re-license its public datasets hosted here using the CDLA-Permissive 2.0, starting with Project CodeNet, a large-scale dataset with 14 million code samples developed to drive algorithmic innovations in AI for code tasks like code translation, code similarity, code classification, and code search.

Microsoft Research is announcing that the following data sets are now being made available under CDLA-Permissive-2.0:

  • The Hippocorpus dataset, which comprises diary-like short stories about recalled and imagined events to help examine the cognitive processes of remembering and imagining and their traces in language;
  • The Public Perception of Artificial Intelligence data set, comprising analyses of text corpora over time to reveal trends in beliefs, interest, and sentiment about a topic;
  • The Xbox Avatars Descriptions data set, a corpus of descriptions of Xbox avatars created by actual gamers;         
  • A Dual Word Embeddings data set, trained on Bing queries, to facilitate information retrieval about documents; and
  • A GPS Trajectory data set, containing 17,621 trajectories with a total distance of about 1.2 million kilometers and a total duration of 48,000+ hours.

Next Steps and Resources

If you’re interested in learning more, please check out the following resources:

The TODO Group, together with Linux Foundation Research and The New Stack, is conducting a survey as part of a research project on the prevalence and outcomes of open source programs among different organizations across the globe. 

Open source program offices (OSPOs) help set open source strategies and improve an organization’s software development practices. Since 2018, the TODO Group has conducted surveys to assess the state of open source programs across the industry. Today, we are pleased to announce the launch of the 2021 edition featuring additional questions to add value to the community.

The survey will generate insights into the following areas, including:

  • The extent of adoption of open source programs and initiatives 
  • Concerns around the hiring of open source developers 
  • Perceived benefits and challenges of open source programs
  • The impact of open source on organizational strategy

We hope to expand the pool of respondents by translating the survey into Chinese and Japanese. Please participate now; we intend to close the survey in early July. Privacy and confidentiality are important to us. Neither participant names, nor their company names, will be published in the final results.

To take the 2021 OSPO Survey, click the button below:

BONUS

As a thank you for completing this survey, you will receive a 75% discount code on enrollment in The Linux Foundation’s Open Source Management & Strategy training program, a $375 savings. This seven-course online training series is designed to help executives, managers, and software developers understand and articulate the basic concepts for building effective open source practices within their organization.


PRIVACY

Your name and company name will not be published. Reviews are attributed to your role, company size, and industry. Responses will be subject to the Linux Foundation’s Privacy Policy, available at https://linuxfoundation.org/privacy. Please note that survey partners who are not Linux Foundation employees will be involved in reviewing the survey results. If you do not want them to have access to your name or email address, please do not provide this information.

VISIBILITY

We will summarize the survey data and share the findings during OSPOCon 2021. The summary report will be published on the TODO Group and Linux Foundation websites. 

QUESTIONS

If you have questions regarding this survey, please email us at info@todogroup.org

FINOS, the fintech open source foundation, and its research partners, Linux Foundation Research, Scott Logic, WIPRO, and GitHub, are conducting a survey as part of a research project on the state of open source adoption, contribution, and readiness in the financial services industry. 

The increased prevalence, importance, and value of open source is well understood and widely reported by many industry surveys and studies. However, the rate at which different industries are acknowledging this shift and adapting their own working practices to capitalize on the new world of open source-first differs considerably.

The financial services industry has been a long-time consumer of open source software, however many are struggling in contributing to, and publishing, open source software and standards, and adopting open source methodologies. A lack of understanding of how to build and deploy efficient tooling and governance models are often seen as a limiting factor.

This survey and report seeks to explore open source within the context of financial services organizations; including banks, asset managers, and hedge funds but will be designed as a resource to be used by all financial services organizations, with the goal to make this an annual survey with a year-on-year tracing of metrics. 

Please participate now; we intend to close the survey in early July. Privacy and confidentiality are important to us. Neither participant names, nor their company names, will be published in the final results.

To take the 2021 FINOS Survey, click the button below:

BONUS

As a thank-you for completing this survey, you will receive a 75% discount code on enrollment in the Linux Foundation’s Open Source Management & Strategy training program, a $375 savings. This seven-course online training series is designed to help executives, managers, and software developers understand and articulate the basic concepts for building effective open source practices within their organization.


PRIVACY

Your name and company name will not be published. Reviews are attributed to your role, company size, and industry. Responses will be subject to the Linux Foundation’s Privacy Policy, available at https://linuxfoundation.org/privacy. Please note that survey partners who are not Linux Foundation employees will be involved in reviewing the survey results. If you do not want them to have access to your name or email address, please do not provide this information.

VISIBILITY

We will summarize the survey data and share the findings during Open Source Strategy Forum, 2021. The summary report will be published on the FINOS and Linux Foundation websites. 

QUESTIONS

If you have questions regarding this survey, please email us at info@finos.org

Linux Foundation with support from IBM and Call for Code hosts ‘Intelligent Supervision Assistant for Construction’ project from Build Change to help builders identify structural issues in masonry walls or concrete columns, especially in areas affected by disasters

SAN FRANCISCO, June 10, 2021 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced it will host the Intelligent Supervision Assistant for Construction (ISAC-SIMO) project, which was created by Build Change with a grant from IBM as part of the Call for Code initiative. The Autodesk Foundation, a Build Change funder, also contributed pro-bono expertise to advise the project’s development.

Build Change helps save lives in earthquakes and windstorms. Its mission is to prevent housing loss caused by disasters by transforming the systems that regulate, finance, build and improve houses around the world. 

ISAC-SIMO packages important construction quality assurance checks into a convenient mobile app. The tool harnesses the power of machine learning and image processing to provide feedback on specific construction elements such as masonry walls and reinforced concrete columns. Users can choose a building element check and upload a photo from the site to receive a quick assessment.

“ISAC-SIMO has amazing potential to radically improve construction quality and ensure that homes are built or strengthened to a resilient standard, especially in areas affected by earthquakes, windstorms, and climate change,” said Dr. Elizabeth Hausler, Founder & CEO of Build Change. “We’ve created a foundation from which the open source community can develop and contribute different models to enable this tool to reach its full potential. The Linux Foundation, building on the support of IBM over these past three years, will help us build this community.”

ISAC-SIMO was imagined as a solution to gaps in technical knowledge that were apparent in the field. The app ensures that workmanship issues can be more easily identified by anyone with a phone, instead of solely relying on technical staff. It does this by comparing user-uploaded images against trained models to assess whether the work done is broadly acceptable (go) or not (no go) along with a specific score. The project is itself built on open source software, including Python through Django, Jupyter Notebooks, and React Native.

“Due to the pandemic, the project deliverables and target audience have evolved. Rather than sharing information and workflows between separate users within the app, the app has pivoted to provide tools for each user to perform their own checks based on their role and location. This has led to a general framework that is well-suited for plugging in models from the open source community, beyond Build Change’s original use case,” said Daniel Krook, IBM Chief Technology Officer for the Call for Code Global Initiative.

IBM and The Linux Foundation have a rich history of deploying projects that fundamentally make change and progress in society through innovation – and remain committed during COVID-19. The winner of the 2018 Call for Code Global Challenge, Project OWL, contributed its IoT device firmware in March 2020 as the ClusterDuck Protocol, and since then, twelve more Call for Code deployment projects like ISAC-SIMO that address disasters, climate change, and racial justice, have been open sourced for communities that need them most.

The project encourages new users to contribute and to deploy the software in new environments around the world. Priorities for short term updates include improvements in user interface, contributions to the image dataset for different construction elements, and support to automatically detect if the perspective of an image is flawed. For more information, please visit: ​https://www.isac-simo.net/docs/contribute/.

For more information on IBM’s role in this work, please visit: https://developer.ibm.com/callforcode/blogs/call-for-code-app-uses-ai-to-make-homes-safer-and-more-resilient/.

About The Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. The Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page:  https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact

Jennifer Cloer
for the Linux Foundation
503-867-2304
jennifer@storychangesculture.com

Registration for the Virtual Event is now Open

SAN FRANCISCO, May 5, 2021 The Open Mainframe Project (OMP), an open source initiative that enables collaboration across the mainframe community to develop shared tool sets and resources, today announced plans for its 2nd annual Open Mainframe Summit, the premier mainframe event of 2021. The event, set for September 22-23, is open to students, developers, users and contributors of Open Mainframe projects from around the globe looking to learn, network and collaborate. As a virtual event again this year, Open Mainframe Summit will feature content tracks that tackle both business and technical strategies for enterprise development and deployment.

In Open Mainframe Project’s inaugural event last year, more than 380 registrants from 175 companies joined the two-day conference that featured 36 sessions. Some of the most popular sessions were the Women in Tech panel, COBOL sessions, new mainframer journey and project overview sessions for Ambitus, Feilong, Polycephaly, and Zowe. The event report can be found here and all of the videos can be watched here.

“Open Mainframe Project is becoming the gateway to all educational tools and initiatives that run some of the world’s biggest enterprise systems,” said John Mertic, Director of Program Management at the Linux Foundation. “For our inaugural event last year, we merely dipped our toes in the water as a new summit. This year, we’ll see more change makers speaking about open source innovation, creativity and diversity in mainframe related technologies. We look forward to igniting conversations that are going to positively impact all facets of mainframes.”

Call for Proposals

The Call for Proposals is now open and will be accepting submissions until July 16, 2021. Interested speakers can submit proposals in five tracks such as business overview, Linux on Z, z/OS, education and training and diversity, equity and inclusion. Options for presentations include lightning talks, 30-minute sessions and panel discussions.

A program committee, which will include maintainers, active community members and project leaders, will review and rate the proposals once all the submissions are in. This year, Open Mainframe Project welcomes Greg MacKinnon, Distinguished Engineer at Broadcom, Inc; Joe Winchester, Technical Staff Member at IBM; Kimberly Andersson, Director of Experience Design at Rocket Software; Stacey Miller, Product Marketing Manager at SUSE; and Harry Williams, Chief Technology Officer at Marist College as the 2021 Open Mainframe Summit program committee.

Submit a proposal here: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/open-mainframe-summit/program/cfp/.

Whether a company is a member or contributor of Open Mainframe Project or is sponsoring the event has no impact on whether talks from their developers will be selected. However, being a community leader does have an impact, as program committee members will often rate talks from the creators or leaders of an open source project more highly. Focus on work with an open source project, whether it is one of the Open Mainframe Project’s 18 hosted projects or working groups that adds value to the ecosystem.

Conference Registration for the online event is $50 for general attendance and $15 for academia. Registration is now open, click here to register.

Thank you Sponsors

Open Mainframe Summit is made possible with support from our Platinum Sponsors Broadcom Mainframe Software, Rocket Software, and SUSE; our Gold Sponsor Vicom Infinity; and our Academic and Community Sponsors CD Foundation and the Fintech Open Source Foundation (FINOS). To become a sponsor, click here.

For more about Open Mainframe Project, visit https://www.openmainframeproject.org/

About the Open Mainframe Project

The Open Mainframe Project is intended to serve as a focal point for deployment and use of Linux and Open Source in a mainframe computing environment. With a vision of Open Source on the Mainframe as the standard for enterprise class systems and applications, the project’s mission is to build community and adoption of Open Source on the mainframe by eliminating barriers to Open Source adoption on the mainframe, demonstrating value of the mainframe on technical and business levels, and strengthening collaboration points and resources for the community to thrive. Learn more about the project at https://www.openmainframeproject.org.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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  • Project embraces open governance model, creates new neutral, cross-community Technical Steering Committee open for collaboration
  • Community welcomes 11 new member organizations fostering innovation for 5G mobile packet core
  • Magma Core Foundation’s project roadmap integral to cross-community collaboration enabling end-to-end solutions and blueprints 

SAN FRANCISCOApril 21, 2021  Today, the Magma project, an open-source software platform that gives network operators an open, flexible and extendable mobile core network solution, announced project and community growth since its recent move to the Linux Foundation to establish a neutral governance framework. 

Since moving to the Linux Foundation, Magma has made strides as a community, in partnership with the Open Infrastructure Foundation and OpenAirInterface Software Alliance. The collaboration has formally become the Magma Core Foundation, and project and community growth includes new members, the adoption of a master architecture roadmap, and formation of a neutral governance structure. In addition, the community will host its first Linux Foundation-managed event, Magma Day, co-located with KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2021. 

“We are pleased to see the Magma Core Foundation continue to evolve as a leader in network innovation,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Edge, and IoT, the Linux Foundation. “Additional collaboration efforts are underway via initiatives like the 5G Super Blueprint which enables communities to build and augment modern networks at scale across 5G, carrier Wi-Fi, private LTE, and more.” 

“The OpenAirInterface Software Alliance continues to participate in the Magma Core Foundation as a major contributor to the developments of the core network,” said Irfan Ghauri,  Director of Operations of the OpenAirInterface Software Alliance. “The seed code for one of the main components of the Magma core (MME) is in fact OAI. The fact that early implementations are making it into production improving users’ lives is in itself a great source of satisfaction for the OSA. The Alliance continues to contribute through its engineers in the entrails of the Magma core and looks forward to increased adoption of the latter, as greater stability and completeness is achieved over time. This is very hard work but the OSA remains committed to delivering the next features including non-stand alone support and others.”

“Since the early days of the Magma project, the OpenInfra Foundation and our global community have aligned with the community’s goals to connect the next billion people,” said Mark Collier,  COO of the Open Infrastructure Foundation and member of the Magma Core Foundation governing board. “We support the development of Magma to form a next-generation mobile networking stack that’s aligned with our mission to create open infrastructure code that runs in production. We’re excited to see more organizations coming on board to collaborate with us as we support that goal.”

The Magma Core Foundation welcomes 11 new member organizations across CSPs, processing, storage, edge, and more. New members 0chain, Aarna Networks, Connect5G, FreedomFi, GenXComm, Helium, Highway9Networks, MotoJeannie, Shoelace Wireless, Vapor IO, and Whitestack  join existing members, including Arm, Deutsche Telekom, and Facebook. The community will work collaboratively on the future of mobile network core solutions, via a new architecture roadmap that’s 3GPP generation and access network (cellular or WiFi) agnostic. It can flexibly support a radio access network with minimal development and deployment effort, and includes three major components: Access Gateway, Orchestrator, and Federation Gateway. 

To help shepherd this work, a new neutral governance structure, including a Technical Steering Committee (TSC), has been formed. Newly-elected TSC members  include Marie Bremner, Raphael Defosseus, Hunter Gatewood, Scott Moeller, and Pravin Shelar. 

Magma Day

Join the Magma Core Project community on May 3 from 2:30 – 6:00 pm CEST for a virtual Magma Day event. Co-located with KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2021, Magma Day  is designed to bring CNCF/Kubernetes, LF Networking, and LF Edge communities working across 4G, 5G, and global connectivity together.  Magma Day will include a comprehensive review of Magma (use cases, roadmap, vision, architecture) and how to build end-to-end telecom solutions using Magma across open source projects. Access the event schedule and register to add Magma Day to your KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2021 registration today.

Member support for the Magma Core Foundation 

0chain

“0Chain powered Magma enables siloed WiFi connectivity within businesses to form a seamless augmented network to enhance mobile user experience and reduce operator costs”, said Saswata Basu, CEO & Founder of 0Chain, world leader in blockchain and decentralized storage. “In addition, 0Chain dramatically cuts contract negotiation time from years to seconds, and provides dynamic pricing for augmented network providers.” 

Aarna Networks

“We are delighted to join the Magma Core project,” said Amar Kapadia, co-founder and CEO, Aarna Networks. “By integrating Magma Core with ONAP and Kubernetes, we plan to provide communication service providers, government organizations, and enterprises with a fully open source solution that could democratize and accelerate 5G deployments worldwide.”

Connect5G

“Magma is the one and truly pioneering project – providing open, unified and access convergent networking. We at Connect 5G believe that the future of the global communication lies in the open technology stacks. Our mission is to bring the rural and remote areas to the global network,” said Patrik Melander, chairman and CEO, Connect5G, Inc. “For that purpose we selected Magma as the one and truly pioneering project that provides open, unified and access convergent networking layer.”

FreedomFi

“Most common customer objection about any open source project is that it’s not enterprise ready. We’ve heard those objections about Linux and Kubernetes for years prior to those becoming a standard, and we’ve heard a lot of the same about Magma last year.” said Boris Renski, Co-Founder and CEO at FreedomFi. “This year we start seeing customers like Access Parks choosing Magma over a variety of open source and proprietary alternatives to power hundreds of cell sites across the national and state park system. We are quickly approaching the end of Magma-is-not-enterprise-ready cycle and are excited to collaborate with the Linux foundation to grow the project ecosystem.” 

Helium

“Helium started with a vision to enable wireless networks for IoT powered by the people with a new blockchain-based incentive model,” said Frank Mong, the COO of Helium Inc. “We’re excited to join the Linux Foundation and the Magma ecosystem to continue to make building all wireless networks possible by combining cryptocurrency, open source, and bringing access to more people globally.”

Highway9 Networks

“Magma significantly opens, modernizes and steers the mobility core stack. Highway9 Networks is excited to partner with the Magma community as we deliver innovative 5G ready edge cloud solutions to the enterprise,” said Allwyn Sequeira, Founder/CEO of Highway9 Networks

MotoJeannie

“Magma Core provides the necessary toolset that’s needed for the industry to innovate. At MotoJeannie, we use a curated form of Magma core, enabling us to focus on delivering the desired value to our end customers. Linux foundation knows how to develop values for the ecosystem using open source, and we are very excited to be part of this community,” said Ayush Sharma, founder and CEO, MotoJeannie. 

Shoelace Wireless

“Magma converged core provides cost effective cloud native orchestration of WiFi and LTE networks which is critical for Shoelace Wireless’ intelligent-edge multipath traffic steering, switching, and aggregation technology to enable use cases such as: network augmentation, smart contract roaming, predictive traffic steering, and HetNet optimization,” said Jim Mains, CEO, Shoelace Wireless.  “The fact that Magma is open-sourced also allows us to work with innovative partners to accelerate market deployment which otherwise would take many years.”

Vapor.io

“Open technologies like Magma will help revolutionize both US and global communications infrastructure,” said Cole Crawford founder & CEO of edge and grid infrastructure company Vapor IO. “We have always believed that neutral host multi-tenancy and shared infrastructure unlock the economics that enable the worldwide rollout of advanced networks like 5G. Vapor IO’s Kinetic services are ideal for Magma, and we look forward to working with our partners to implement and deploy it on our network.”

Resources

About the Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

SAN FRANCISCO – April 19, 2020 –  Today, the ELISA (Enabling Linux in Safety Applications) Project, an open source initiative that aims to create a shared set of tools and processes to help companies build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems, announced that Codethink, Horizon Robotics, Huawei Technologies, NVIDIA and Red Hat has joined its global ecosystem.

Linux is used in safety-critical applications with all major industries because it can enable faster time to market for new features and take advantage of the quality of the code development processes which decreases the issues that could result in loss of human life, significant property damage, or environmental damage. Launched in February 2019 by the Linux Foundation, ELISA will work with certification authorities and standardization bodies across industries to document how Linux can be used in safety-critical systems.

“Open source software has become a significant part of the technology strategy to accelerate innovation for companies worldwide,” said Kate Stewart, Vice President of Dependable Embedded Systems at The Linux Foundation. “We want to reduce the barriers to be able to use Linux in safety-critical applications and welcome the collaboration of new members to help build specific use cases for automotive, medical and industrial sectors.”

Milestones

After a little more than two years, ELISA has continued to see momentum in project and technical milestones. Examples include:

  • Successful Workshops: In February, ELISA hosted its 6th workshop with more than 120 registered participants. During the workshop, members and external speakers discussed cybersecurity expectations in the automotive world, code coverage of glibc and Intel’s Linux test robot. Learn more in this blog. The next workshop is scheduled for May 18-20 and is free to attend. Register here.
  • New Ambassador Program: In October 2020, ELISA launched a program with thought leaders with expertise in functional safety and Linux kernel development. These ambassadors are willing to speak at events, write articles and work directly with the community on mentorships or onboarding new contributors. Meet the ambassadors here
  • Mentorship Opportunities: The Linux Foundation offers a Mentorship Program with projects that are designed to help developers with the necessary skills to contribute effectively to open source communities. A recent program, ELISA participated in the Fall 2020 session with Code coverage metrics for GLibC and a Linux Kernel mentorship focused on CodeChecker. This project supports ELISA’s goals to gain experience in using various status analysis methods and tools available in the Linux kernel. Learn more here.
  • Working Groups: Since launch, the project has created several working groups that collaborate and work towards providing resources for System integrators to apply and use to analyze qualitatively and quantitatively on their systems. Current groups include an Automotive Working Group, Medical Devices Working Group, Safety Architecture Working Group,  Kernel Development Process Working Group and Tool Investigation and Code Improvement Sub-Working Group to focus on specific activities and goals. Learn more or join a working group here

“The primary challenge is selecting Linux components and features that can be evaluated for safety and identifying gaps where more work is needed to evaluate safety sufficiently,” said Shuah Khan, Chair of the ELISA Project Technical Steering Committee and Linux Fellow at the Linux Foundation. “We’ve taken on this challenge to make it easier for companies to build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications by exploring potential methods to enable engineers to answer that question for their specific system.”

Learn more about the goals and technical strategy in this white paper

Growing Ecosystem

After a little more than two years, the ELISA Project has grown by 300%. With new members Codethink, Horizon Robotics, Huawei Technologies, NVIDIA and Red Hat, the project currently has 20 members that collaborate to define and maintain a standardized set of processes and tools that can be integrated into Linux-based, safety-critical systems seeking safety certification. These new members join BMW Car IT GmbH, Intel, Toyota, ADIT, AISIN AW CO., arm, Elektrobit, Kuka, Linuxtronix. Mentor, Suzuki, Wind River, Automotive Grade Linux and OTH Regensburg.

“Codethink has been working with ELISA for a few years and we are excited to continue our engagement as a member,” said Shaun Mooney, Division Manager at Codethink. “Open Source Software, particularly Linux, is being used more and more in safety applications and Codethink has been looking at how we can make software trustable for a long time. We’ve been working to understand how we can use complex software and guarantee it will function as we want it to. This problem needs to be tackled collectively and ELISA is a great place to collaborate with experts in both safety and software. We’ve been working with most of the working groups since the start of ELISA and will continue to be active participants, using our expert knowledge of Linux and Open Source to help advance the state of the art for safety.”

“Safety is the most important feature of a self-driving car,” said Huang Chang, co-founder and CTO of Horizon Robotics. “Horizon’s investment into functional safety is one of the most important ones we’ve ever made, and it provides a critical ingredient for automakers to bring self-driving cars to market. The creative safety construction the ELISA project is undertaking complements Horizon’s functional safety endeavor and continued commitment to certifying Linux-based safety-critical systems.”

“Huawei is one of the most important Linux kernel contributors and recently joined the automotive industry as strategic partner in Asia and Europe,” said Alessandro Biasci, Technical Expert at Huawei.“ We are pleased to further advance our mission and participate in ELISA, which will allow us to combine our experience in the Linux kernel development and knowledge in safety and security to bring Linux to safety-critical applications.”

“Edge computing extends enterprise software from the datacenter and cloud to a myriad of operational and embedded technology footprints that interact with the physical world, such as connected vehicles and manufacturing equipment,” said Chris Wright, Chief Technical Officer at Red Hat. “A common open source software platform across these locations simplifies and accelerates solution development, while supporting functional safety’s end goal of reducing the risk of physical injury. Red Hat recognizes the importance of establishing functional safety evidence and certifications for Linux, backed by a rich platform and vibrant ecosystem for safety-related applications. We are excited to bring our twenty-seven years of Linux expertise to the ELISA community’s work.”

For more information about ELISA, visit https://elisa.tech/.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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Data and storage technologies are evolving. The SODA Foundation is conducting a survey to identify the current challenges, gaps, and trends for data and storage in the era of cloud-native, edge, AI, and 5G. Through new insights generated from the data and storage community at large, end-users will be better equipped to make decisions, vendors can improve their products, and the SODA Foundation can establish new technical directions — and beyond!

The SODA Foundation is an open source project under Linux Foundation that aims to foster an ecosystem of open source data management and storage software for data autonomy. SODA Foundation offers a neutral forum for cross-project collaboration and integration and provides end-users quality end-to-end solutions. We intend to use this survey data to help guide the SODA Foundation and its surrounding ecosystem on important issues.

Please participate now; we intend to close the survey in late May. 

Privacy and confidentiality are important to us. Neither participant names, nor their company names, will be displayed in the final results. 

The first 50 survey respondents will each receive a $25 (USD) Amazon gift card. Some conditions apply.

This survey should take no more than 15 minutes of your time.

To take the 2021 SODA Foundation Data & Storage Trends Survey, click the button below:

Thanks to our survey partners Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA), Japan Data Storage Forum (JDSF), China Open Source Cloud League (COSCL), Open Infrastructure Foundation (OIF), Mulan Open Source Community

SURVEY GOALS

Thank you for taking the time to participate in this survey conducted by SODA Foundation, an open source project at the Linux Foundation focusing on data management and storage.

This survey will provide insights into the challenges, gaps, and trends for data and storage in the era of cloud-native, edge, AI, and 5G. We hope these insights will help end-users make better decisions, enable vendors to improve their products and serve as a guide to the technical direction of SODA and the surrounding ecosystem.

This survey will provide insights into:

  • What are the data & storage challenges faced by end-users?
  • Which features and capabilities do end users look for in data and storage solutions?
  • What are the key trends shaping the data & storage industry?
  • Which open source data & storage projects are users interested in?
  • What cloud strategies are businesses adopting?

PRIVACY

Your name and company name will not be displayed. Reviews are attributed to your role, company size, and industry. Responses will be subject to the Linux Foundation’s Privacy Policy, available at https://linuxfoundation.org/privacy. Please note that members of the SODA Foundation survey committee who are not LF employees will review the survey results and coordinate the gift card giveaways. If you do not want them to have access to your name or email address in connection with this, please do not provide your name or email address and you will not be included in the giveaway.

VISIBILITY

We will summarize the survey data and share the learnings during SODACON Global 2021 – Virtual on Jul 13-14. The summary report will be published on the SODA website. In addition, we will be producing an in-depth report of the survey which will be shared with all survey participants.

SODACON GLOBAL 2021

Interested in attending or speaking at SODACON Global? Details for the event can be found at https://sodafoundation.io/events/sodacon-2021-global-virtual/

QUESTIONS

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  • Participation by the fortune 1 enterprise brings technical leadership and unprecedented scale to LFN projects across Network Management & Automation
  • Koby Avital, EVP of Technology Platforms, Walmart Global Tech, joins the Governing Board as LFN Platinum member
  • Community Growth signals ecosystem commitment to leverage open source for collaborative network transformation across Cloud, Enterprise and Service Provider Ecosystems.

SAN FRANCISCO– March 31, 2021 – LF Networking (LFN), the de-facto collaboration ecosystem for Open Source Networking projects, today announced that Walmart has joined as a Platinum member. Walmart is the first retail member of LFN and joins 21 other global organizations as Platinum members all working to accelerate open source networking.  

“We are thrilled to welcome Walmart to the LF Networking community,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Edge and IoT, at the Linux Foundation. “As the world’s largest retailer, Walmart brings expertise across a broad swath of areas, including retail point of sale networking, enterprise IT, and hybrid cloud deployments.  We look forward to collaborative efforts that accelerate the open source networking community.”

“I’m excited to join the Linux Foundation Networking Governing Board on behalf of Walmart,” said Koby Avital, Executive Vice President, Walmart Global Tech. “By joining LFN, Walmart has the opportunity to contribute, influence the cloud growth and better support the enterprise and service provider communities by open-sourcing innovative technologies across its retail infrastructure.”

Join the LF Networking community October 11-12 for Open Networking and Edge Summit (ONES), the industry’s premier open networking event, expanded to comprehensively cover Edge Computing, Edge Cloud & IoT. ONES North America enables collaborative development and innovation across enterprises, service providers/telcos and cloud providers to shape the future of networking and edge computing. Details here: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/open-networking-edge-summit-north-america/.

About the Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage.

Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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