SAN FRANCISCO, April 30, 2019 — Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open source platform for connected car technologies, has announced that CloudBees, Crave.io, FPT Software, and Github have joined AGL.

“As we dive into the second quarter of this year, we are thrilled to see our community grow and flourish,” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation. “The traction we are experiencing can be seen through new members as well as the growing number of  AGL-based products and services coming to market. We are happy to welcome our new members and look forward to leveraging their expertise as we continue to build out new features and functionalities on the AGL platform.”

AGL is an open source project at the Linux Foundation that is bringing together automakers, suppliers and technology companies to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open, shared software platform for all technology in the vehicle, from infotainment to autonomous driving. Sharing a single software platform across the industry reduces fragmentation and accelerates time-to-market by encouraging the growth of a global ecosystem of developers and application providers that can build a product once and have it work for multiple automakers.

New Member Quotes:

CloudBees
“CloudBees is excited to support the development and adoption of the ‘connected car’ as members of the Automotive Grade Linux open source project under the Linux Foundation,” said Anders Wallgren, Vice President of Technology Strategy, CloudBees. “Bringing continuous software delivery management expertise for build and test optimization will help the automotive industry – now highly predicated on rapid innovation – to accelerate time to market of new technologies by eliminating wait times for build and test cycles.”

FPT Software
“FPT’s mission is to offer comprehensive automotive services and solutions that facilitate the use of infotainment, telematics and autonomous driving,” said Mr. Nguyen Duc Kinh, Director of Automotive and Manufacturing industry, FPT Software. “We yearn to collaborate and contribute to the world’s largest open collaboration communities to jointly develop the next-gen technologies of Connected Car.”

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About Automotive Grade Linux (AGL)
Automotive Grade Linux is a collaborative open source project that is bringing together automakers, suppliers and technology companies to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open software stack for the connected car. With Linux at its core, AGL is developing an open platform from the ground up that can serve as the de facto industry standard to enable rapid development of new features and technologies. Although initially focused on In-Vehicle-Infotainment (IVI), AGL is the only organization planning to address all software in the vehicle, including instrument cluster, heads up display, telematics, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous driving. The AGL platform is available to all, and anyone can participate in its development. Automotive Grade Linux is hosted at the Linux Foundation. Learn more at automotivelinux.org.

Additional AGL Resources:

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure, including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at LinuxFoundation.org.

Media Inquiries
Emily Olin
Automotive Grade Linux, the Linux Foundation
eolin@linuxfoundation.org

 

Volkswagen Joins Automotive Grade Linux and the Linux Foundation
to Accelerate Open Source Innovation and Shared Software Development

Leading German automaker continues its transformation from automobile manufacturer to mobility provider
by investing in open source and shared development of automotive software

SAN FRANCISCO, April 8, 2019 — Automotive Grade Linux, a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open source platform for connected car technologies, has announced that Volkswagen has joined Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) and the Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source.

AGL is an open source project at the Linux Foundation that is changing the way automotive manufacturers build software. More than 130 members are working together to develop a common platform that can serve as the de facto industry standard for infotainment, telematics and instrument cluster applications. Adopting an open platform across the industry enables automakers and suppliers to share and reuse the same code base, which reduces development costs, decreases time-to-market for new products and reduces fragmentation across the industry.

“The automotive industry is undergoing a digital transformation, and automakers and their suppliers are increasingly adopting open source solutions, like the AGL platform, to drive rapid innovation and enable them to bring products to market faster,” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation. “We are very excited to welcome Volkswagen to the AGL community, and we look forward to leveraging the technological expertise of their developers and engineers as we continue to enhance the AGL platform and develop new functionalities.”

In 2008, Volkswagen contributed the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus networking subsystem to the Linux Kernel 2.6.25, which paved the way for a standardized socket API for developers and a common CAN network driver model for SoCs and PC-style CAN hardware. Within this contribution process, Volkswagen and non-automotive CAN users learned a lot from each other’s use-cases so that the Linux CAN support is now widely used in industrial, automotive and academic setups (e.g. CERN).

“The Open Source approach provides excellent software solutions that are suitable to enable a long-term support of software over the vehicle life cycle,” says Oliver Hartkopp, Open Source specialist at Volkswagen. “To ensure robust and secure solutions for our customers we want to be in close connection with the community to be able to directly interact with developers and maintainers.”

Working with communities and providing knowledge, ideas and source code requires a new mindset in the automotive industry. Volkswagen is joining AGL to become a member of the development community for the common automotive Linux platform.

Developed through a joint effort by dozens of member companies, the AGL Unified Code Base (UCB) platform is an open source software platform for infotainment, telematics and instrument cluster applications. It provides 70% of the starting point for a production project and includes an operating system, middleware and application framework. Automakers and suppliers can customize the platform with features, services and branding to meet their unique product and customer needs.

About Automotive Grade Linux (AGL)
Automotive Grade Linux is a collaborative open source project that is bringing together automakers, suppliers and technology companies to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open software stack for the connected car. With Linux at its core, AGL is developing an open platform from the ground up that can serve as the de facto industry standard to enable rapid development of new features and technologies. Although initially focused on In-Vehicle-Infotainment (IVI), AGL is the only organization planning to address all software in the vehicle, including instrument cluster, heads up display, telematics, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous driving. The AGL platform is available to all, and anyone can participate in its development. Learn more: https://www.automotivelinux.org/

Automotive Grade Linux is a Collaborative Project at The Linux Foundation. Linux Foundation Collaborative Projects are independently funded software projects that harness the power of collaborative development to fuel innovation across industries and ecosystems.

Additional Resources

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Inquiries
Emily Olin
Automotive Grade Linux
eolin@linuxfoundation.org

The New CIP SLTS Kernel Expands the Support Architecture to include ARM64

SAN FRANCISCO –  February 25, 2019 – The Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) Project, which enables long-term management of infrastructure systems through a base layer of industrial grade open source software components, tools and methods, today announced the release of the Super Long Term Support (SLTS) Kernel. The new kernel expands architectural support for the 64-bit Arm® Cortex, which enables developers to use it in a variety of use cases including building automation, machine learning and artificial intelligence.

As requirements for reliability, connectivity and feature-richness increase, the amount of software needed to implement and maintain civil infrastructure systems has grown to unprecedented levels. These systems are the foundation for modern society and are ubiquitously responsible for supervision, control, and management of infrastructure for communities and industries across the globe. With these demands, there are unique challenges for safety, security and reliability requirements as updates are needed on an ongoing basis.

Hosted by the Linux Foundation, CIP aims to speed implementation of Linux-based civil infrastructure systems through industrial grade software and a universal operating system, build upon existing open source foundations and expertise, establish de facto standards by providing a base layer reference implementation, and contribute to and influence upstream projects regarding industrial needs.

“We depend on technical systems on a daily basis to keep us safe. Often times these are Linux-based systems that have to be maintained for more than ten years,” said Yoshitake Kobayashi, CIP Chair of the Technical Steering Committee and Senior Manager of The Open-Source Technology Department, Toshiba Corporation. “It is critical for us to better prepare our civil infrastructure systems, and the SLTS CIP kernel gets us one step closer to sustainability for up to multiple decades. With the new support for Arm64, the kernel can be applied to broader applications that are the future backbone of our lives.”

CROSS-INDUSTRY COLLABORATION AND DEVELOPMENT

Real-time Linux is a critical component for industrial grade systems. In addition to real-time management and data,  industrial systems require safety, security and reliability, which is why CIP plans to collaborate with the new Enabling Linux in Safety Applications (ELISA) project at the Linux Foundation. ELISA is an open source project to create a shared set of tools and processes to help companies build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems whose failure could result in loss of human life, significant property damage or environmental damage. Building off the work being done by SIL2LinuxMP project and Real-Time Linux project, ELISA will make it easier for companies to build safety-critical systems such as robotic devices, medical devices, smart factories, transportation systems and autonomous driving using Linux.

“Long-term maintenance and support is essential for the safety, security, and reliability required by embedded systems operating in industrial and infrastructure environments,” said Kate Stewart, Senior Director of Strategic Programs at the Linux Foundation. “With ELISA, we are collaborating with the broader Linux Foundation community like CIP to make this initiative successful. We look forward to working with CIP and its members on establishing processes and tooling to support certification of Linux-based safety-critical applications.”

CIP has also launched two new working groups to help manage specific aspects of the development process.

The Security Working Group will work with various security standards that help to address cyber security issues. Led by Renesas Electronics, the focus of the workgroup is for suppliers to certify using IEC 62443-4-x standards, which is one of the most important  security specification  for industrial products. They will keep the CIP platform up to date by certifying against various available standards and minimize the development time and cost for suppliers by creating a well-defined process for certification.

The Software Update Working Group will provide a robust software update tool that integrates and strengthens the industrial-grade open source base layer. Led by the Toshiba Corporation, the working group will focus on the software architecture, integrating chosen software into the Linux image build tools used by CIP Core and implementing the software update reference boards.

CIP is driven by some of the world’s most innovative industry leaders such as Codethink, Cybertrust, Hitachi, Moxa, Plat’Home, Renesas, Siemens and Toshiba and closely collaborates with other open source projects, such as Linux Kernel LTS, Debian Project, KernelCI. Many members plan to support the SLTS CIP kernel including Renesas, which recently announce RZ/G2 MPUs that will serve as a reference hardware for Arm64 for the certification and release of CIP Linux packages.

The source files for the CIP SLTS kernel can be found here: https://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/cip/linux-cip.git/log/?h=linux-4.19.y.

Additional CIP Resources:

About CIP

The Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) is an open source project hosted by The Linux Foundation. The project is focused on establishing an open source base layer of industrial grade software to enable the use and implementation of reusable software building blocks that meet the safety, reliability and other requirements of industrial and civil infrastructure. For additional information, visit https://www.cip-project.org/.

About The Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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Arm, BMW Car IT GmbH, KUKA, Linutronix, and Toyota join ELISA project to advance open source functional safety across transportation, manufacturing, healthcare, and energy industries

SAN FRANCISCO, February 21, 2019 – The Linux Foundation today launched the Enabling Linux in Safety Applications (ELISA) open source project to create a shared set of tools and processes to help companies build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems whose failure could result in loss of human life, significant property damage or environmental damage. Building off the work being done by SIL2LinuxMP project and Real-Time Linux project, ELISA will make it easier for companies to build safety-critical systems such as robotic devices, medical devices, smart factories, transportation systems and autonomous driving using Linux. Founding members of ELISA include Arm, BMW Car IT GmbH, KUKA, Linutronix, and Toyota.

To be trusted, safety-critical systems must meet functional safety objectives for the overall safety of the system, including how it responds to actions such as user errors, hardware failures, and environmental changes. Companies must demonstrate that their software meets strict demands for reliability, quality assurance, risk management, development process, and documentation. Because there is no clear method for certifying Linux, it can be difficult for a company to demonstrate that their Linux-based system meets these safety objectives.

“All major industries, including energy, medical and automotive, want to use Linux for safety-critical applications because it can enable them to bring products to market faster and reduce the risk of critical design errors. The challenge has been the lack of the clear documentation and tools needed to demonstrate that a Linux-based system meets the necessary safety requirements for certification,” said Kate Stewart, Senior Director of Strategic Programs at The Linux Foundation. “Past attempts at solving this have lacked the critical mass needed to establish a widely discussed and accepted methodology, but with the formation of ELISA, we will be able to leverage the infrastructure and support of the broader Linux Foundation community that is needed to make this initiative successful.”

ELISA will work with certification authorities and standardization bodies in multiple industries to establish how Linux can be used as a component in safety-critical systems. The project will also define and maintain a common set of elements, processes and tools that can be incorporated into Linux-based, safety-critical systems amenable to safety certification.

Additional project goals include:

  • Develop reference documentation and use cases.
  • Educate the open source community on safety engineering best practices and educate the safety community on open source concepts.
  • Enable continuous feedback with the open source community to improve processes, and to automate quality assessment and assurance.
  • Support members with incident and hazard monitoring of critical components relevant to their systems and establish best practices for member response teams.

For more information about ELISA, visit elisa.tech.

Industry Support for ELISA

“The safe and effective performance of safety-related software is essential as we increasingly rely on programmable devices in our homes, workplaces and communities at-large. UL looks forward to the launch of ELISA and the opportunity it presents to more rapidly assess and validate – with confidence – the Linux component of safety systems.”
– Tom Blewitt, VP & CTO, UL

“The Open Source Automation Development Lab (OSADL) was founded more than 13 years ago to advance the use of GNU/Linux in industrial products by addressing the need for real-time capabilities and safety certification. Shortly after, we here at OSADL created the OSADL Safety  Critical Linux Working Group for functional safety, which culminated in the SIL2LinuxMP project that laid some groundwork for using GNU/Linux in safety-related systems. We subsequently added legal support and many other services that are needed to successfully use Open Source software in industry to our portfolio. We still continue to foster real-time Linux, among other, as a Gold member of the Linux Foundation’s Real-Time Linux project, and we are proud to see some of the efforts of the SIL2LinuxMP project continued at a larger scale in the ELISA project.”
– Dr. Carsten Emde, General Manager, OSADL

“At Automotive Grade Linux, we are working closely with the Real-Time Linux project and the ELISA project in order to achieve functional safety certifications for automotive applications such as our instrument cluster, heads-up-display and ADAS solutions. By working closely with ELISA, this will help us provide automotive manufacturers with all of the testing artifacts and documentation they need to achieve safety certification for their AGL-based systems.” –
– Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation

“Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) Project is committed to improving implementation of Linux-based civil infrastructure systems through industrial grade software and a universal operating system that is maintained for more than ten years. We work closely with several open source project such as Real-Time Linux, Linux Kernel LTS and KernelCI to achieve Long Term Support (LTS) and safety and security certifications. We support the ELISA Project and its efforts to build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications on a broader scale.”
– Urs Gleim, Governing Board Chair of the Civil Infrastructure Platform, hosted at the Linux Foundation

ELISA Founding Members
Founding members of ELISA include Arm, BMW Car IT GmbH, KUKA, Linutronix, and Toyota.

Arm
“Safety and trust are the highest priorities for the automotive industry as vehicles become more autonomous and Arm’s Automotive Enhanced technologies are at the heart of systems powering these vehicles. The work the Linux Foundation is undertaking with the ELISA project complements Arm’s functional safety leadership and continued commitment to software enablement.”
– Lakshmi Mandyam, VP automotive, Automotive and IoT Line of Business, Arm

KUKA
“KUKA is looking forward to working with other Linux experts in order to define a series of methods and processes, with the goal of certifying Linux-based safety-critical systems.”
– David Fuller, CTO, KUKA AG

Linutronix
“We are happy to see that the SIL2Linux work will continue and advance with the launch of ELISA and provide a clear focus for the use of Linux in safety critical applications. ELISA will help to establish Linux in the industrial control world deeper than ever before.”
– Heinz Egger, CEO, Linutronix

Toyota
“Open source software has become a significant part of our technology strategy, and we want to help make it easier to use Linux-based applications. Toyota believes the ELISA project will support CASE use cases in an innovative way for the automotive industry.”
– Mr. Masato Hashimoto, General Manager of E/E Architecture Development Div., Advanced R&D and Engineering Company, Toyota

About The Linux Foundation
The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Inquiries
Emily Olin
The Linux Foundation
eolin@linuxfoundation.org

Moxa strengthens its commitment to building smart cities based on interoperable open source platform that is secure, reliable and sustainable for more than 10 years

SAN FRANCISCO – January 18, 2017 – The Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) project, which aims to provide a base layer of industrial grade open source software components, tools and methods to enable long-term management of critical systems, today announced that Moxa has joined as a Silver Member. The move helps Moxa, an edge-to-cloud connectivity solution provider that offers a wide range of industrial networking, monitoring and computing products, strengthen its commitment to building smarter factories and cities on an interoperable open source platform that is secure, reliable and sustainable.

Hosted by The Linux Foundation, CIP aims to speed implementation of Linux-based civil infrastructure systems, build upon existing open source foundations and expertise, establish de facto standards by providing a base layer reference implementation, and contribute to and influence upstream projects regarding industrial needs.

“Every solution Moxa creates offers reliability, safety and is easy to integrate,” said SZ Lin, Software Supervisor for Moxa. “We are excited to join the CIP project and believe it will help us ensure high-quality software components that will address the long-term needs of smart cities and the future of manufacturing.”

CIP addresses the needs of long-term software for the power generation and distribution, water, oil and gas, transportation and building automation industries. Moxa joins other industry leaders, such as Codethink, Hitachi, Plat’Home, Renesas, Siemens and Toshiba, in their work to create a reliable and secure Linux-based embedded software platform that can be sustained for more than 10 years.

“CIP is committed to developing, testing and maintaining an industrial grade software that lays the foundation needed for essential global civil infrastructure and economic systems for the next few decades,” said Urs Gleim, Head of the Central Smart Embedded Systems Group at Siemens and CIP Governing Board Chair. “Moxa brings extensive experience in industrial innovation that will be a welcome addition to the CIP members as we work together to create a better future of our communities.”

The CIP community is working to address major challenges civil infrastructure projects face such as:

  • Speed and cost: The community’s work building foundational elements that may be shared across civil infrastructure projects will save time and money.
  • Interoperability: CIP’s open framework supports existing standards.
  • Security and safety: The project’s industrial-grade software foundation is designed to enable delivery of critical services like power, gas and water.
  • Reliability: Because it is based on Linux, CIP will provide a proven software base for system designs.
  • Sustainability: CIP will help establish a long-term maintenance infrastructure for selected open source components, accounting for product life cycles of more than 10 years.

Last year, the project made great strides in developing the tools needed to test and maintain the CIP kernel, such as the CIP Core and Board At Desk v1.0. For more information about CIP and its mission, visit https://wiki.linuxfoundation.org/civilinfrastructureplatform/start.

About Moxa

Moxa is a leading provider of edge connectivity, industrial computing, and network infrastructure solutions for enabling connectivity for the Industrial Internet of Things. With over 30 years of industry experience, Moxa has connected more than 50 million devices worldwide and has a distribution and service network that reaches customers in more than 70 countries. Moxa delivers lasting business value by empowering industry with reliable networks and sincere service for industrial communications infrastructures. Information about Moxa’s solutions is available at www.moxa.com.

About CIP

The Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) is an open source project hosted by The Linux Foundation. The project is focused on establishing an open source base layer of industrial grade software to enable the use and implementation of reusable software building blocks that meet the safety, reliability and other requirements of industrial and civil infrastructure. For additional information, visit https://www.cip-project.org/.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage/  Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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