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Chinese tech giant’s investment expands Foundation’s global footprint, advances machine learning opportunities for cloud native ecosystem  

AUSTIN, TX – KUBECON + CLOUDNATIVECON NORTH AMERICA – December 6, 2017 – The Cloud Native Computing Foundation® (CNCF®), which sustains and integrates open source technologies like Kubernetes® and Prometheus™, today announced that Baidu, Inc. (NASDAQ: BIDU) has joined the Foundation as a Gold Member.

Baidu is a global leader in Artificial Intelligence (AI), using methods including deep learning to develop new AI-enabled initiatives in areas such as autonomous driving, conversational AI, financial services and the cloud. Through collaborative open source development, Baidu and other members are greatly accelerating deep learning innovation with Kubernetes. Last year, Baidu open sourced its deep learning framework, PaddlePaddle, as part of its continued commitment to open source. Earlier this year the project announced compatibility with Kubernetes, making PaddlePaddle one of the first machine learning tools that supports Kubernetes. Baidu, CoreOS and other community members continue to enhance PaddlePaddle and fine-tune it for Kubernetes.

“Baidu has extensive experience in participating in open source communities,” said Watson Yin, Vice President of Baidu. “We decided to open source PaddePaddle over a year ago, and, this July, we announced our overarching commitment to an open platform and win-win AI ecosystem with our partners and developers. Baidu believes cloud native technologies are critical to accelerating machine learning. CNCF membership is a way for us to directly invest in many of the most cutting-edge, promising cloud native technologies to fuel richer, faster deep learning market growth.”  

As the leading Chinese language Internet search provider, Baidu leverages its position at the intersection of big data, technology and search to accelerate the commercialization and application of AI technologies. The company is taking AI to the next stage through its technology and research into areas such as image recognition, speech recognition, natural language processing, and user profiling.

“Baidu is already highly engaged in the cloud native ecosystem through PaddlePaddle,” said Dan Kohn, Executive Director of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. “Kubernetes-powered PaddlePaddle enables cloud providers to offer deep learning at scale for major competitive differentiation. Baidu’s pioneering work with machine learning and Kubernetes will be invaluable to CNCF. We look forward to working with them across a range of cloud native capabilities.”

Additional Resources

About Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Cloud native computing uses an open source software stack to deploy applications as microservices, packaging each part into its own container, and dynamically orchestrating those containers to optimize resource utilization. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts critical components of cloud native software stacks including Kubernetes, Fluentd, linkerd, Prometheus, OpenTracing, gRPC, CoreDNS, containerd, rkt, CNI, Envoy, Jaeger, Notary, and TUF. CNCF serves as the neutral home for collaboration and brings together the industry’s top developers, end users and vendors – including the six largest public cloud providers and many of the leading private cloud companies. CNCF is part of The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization. For more information about CNCF, please visit: https://cncf.io/.

About Baidu

Baidu, Inc. is the leading Chinese language Internet search provider. Baidu aims to make a complex world simpler through technology. Baidu’s ADSs trade on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “BIDU”. Currently, ten ADSs represent one Class A ordinary share.

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“Cloud Native Computing Foundation”, “CNCF” and “Kubernetes” are registered trademarks of The Linux Foundation in the United States and other countries. “Certified Kubernetes” and the Certified Kubernetes design are trademarks of The Linux Foundation in the United States and other countries.

Media Contact

Natasha Woods

The Linux Foundation

(415) 312-5289

PR@CNCF.io

In February we introduced Jaeger in a blog post Evolving Distributed Tracing at Uber Engineering. Two months later Jaeger backend has been released as an open source project. So many things have happened since then. We built a great community of users who deploy Jaeger in their organizations and contribute to the project (special kudos to RedHat’s Hawkular team). We added many new features. We joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation as its 12th project. And now we are proud to announce the official 1.0 release of Jaeger backend.

Even though Jaeger has been integrated with thousands of applications at Uber and running in production for almost two years, we started the open source journey with modest 0.x versions. We knew we had some work ahead of us before we could make Jaeger easily deployable in the cloud environments, flexible in its infrastructure dependencies, backwards compatible with existing solutions, and integrated with other CNCF projects. We think we reached a milestone where we are ready for a 1.0 version.

Storage backends

The first release of Jaeger only supported Cassandra as a storage backend for traces. We chose Cassandra mostly because our team had operational experience with it, but it was obvious that not every team felt that way. Over the summer we implemented another backend store based on ElasticSearch. ES is a lot more popular as a hosted service, which makes deploying a high throughput Jaeger installation even easier. Later on our community made additional improvements to these backends, including support for various authentication methods for securing db connections.

We were also considering support for MySQL backend, but could not prioritize it above other development. Interestingly, we’ve seen our community experimenting with other backends, such as ScyllaDB and InfluxDB.

Improvements in Jaeger UI

Jaeger 1.0 brings a significant number of improvements in its Web UI. Aside from performance optimizations to make it more efficient, we refactored the trace view using a virtual viewport technique that allows it to smoothly handle large traces containing as many as 50,000 spans. Other UI improvements include better navigation through large traces using the zoom-in feature of the minimap and keyboard shortcuts. The top level menu of the UI can now be customized via configuration, which is very useful when deploying Jaeger inside a company and providing links to internal resources such as help pages or opening a ticket for the tracing team.

Prometheus, Docker, and Kubernetes

Jaeger backend itself is a moderately complex distributed system that needs proper production monitoring. In the 1.0 release we made Prometheus the default metrics system integration in all Jaeger backend components. Deploying Jaeger in the cloud manually, “the hard way”, is no fun, even though we provide ready to run Docker images. Fortunately, fellow contributors at RedHat have created a GitHub project jaeger-kubernetes that contains templates for running Jaeger on Kubernetes. Then the Helm community picked up the torch and built a Helm chart that makes the whole process as simple as helm install incubator/jaeger –name myjaeger.

Instrumentation libraries

Even though Jaeger instrumentation libraries are versioned separately from the backend, it is worth mentioning that they are an active area of development, and the 1.0 milestone coincides with the release of the early version of C++ client. Having a C++ client in the toolbelt allows not only an easier path for other scripting languages, but also integration with high performance load balancers like nginx and haproxy and service meshes like Envoy.

Our community is also working on client libraries in other languages, including Objective-C, Ruby, PHP. We are looking forward to bringing these libraries into the Jaeger project as officially supported.

Backwards compatibility with Zipkin

Another active area of development across the Jaeger ecosystem was backwards compatibility with Zipkin. Jaeger backend was enhanced to be a drop-in replacement for Zipkin backend by accepting several Zipkin span formats (Thrift and JSON). Jaeger client libraries include configuration options to make them use Zipkin in-band wire format for trace context propagation.

Why? For many years Zipkin was the only game in town if you wanted to use an open source tracing system. Many organizations have already invested in instrumenting their applications with Zipkin APIs, instead of, say, vendor-neutral OpenTracing APIs. Jaeger’s interop features allow those organizations to switch to Jaeger backend with minimum cost, and to continue using Zipkin in-band wire format while instrumenting new applications with OpenTracing and Jaeger.

Roadmap

Even though we are proud of the functionality we are releasing in v1.0, we are even more excited about the next generation features we are currently working on. Jaeger is a great tool if you want to look at individual traces and investigate performance issues, but individual traces are a tiny portion of the of the overall knowledge that can be gained from tracing data. For example, Jaeger installations at Uber are ingesting over 10 billion spans a day. Thus our top priority are the features that support aggregations, analytics, and data mining, tools on top of Jaeger platform that allow gathering insights about the whole architecture at large. Some of those features are described on the Roadmap page.

We are also looking at tighter integrations with other CNCF projects like Envoy, Linkerd, and Istio, emerging standards like the Trace-Context HTTP header, and alternative instrumentation APIs like OpenCensus.

Try it out!

You can try out Jaeger 1.0 by following our Getting Started guide. Join us on Twitter (@JaegerTracing), Gitter chat room, or the mailing list.

Finally, we would like to thank all our users who extensively tested the pre-releases and helped us in debugging issues. This huge milestone would not have been possible without you!

Connect at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon

If you are attending KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America this week, please join us December 8th for a Jaeger Salon to discuss the project and basic tracing concepts, as well as more advanced topics like adaptive sampling, dependency graphs and tracing with Envoy proxy.

Additionally, do not miss the December 6th session by Jaeger founder Yuri Shkuro, “Would You Like Some Tracing With Your Monitoring?” and the December 7th sessions on SIG Jaeger Update and SIG Jaeger Deep Dive Session.

Logging is a critical component on production environments that allow us to perform monitoring and data analysis. While applications runs at scale, the Logging layer also needs to scale and year over year we see new challenges that needs to be solved from different angles such as parsing, performance, log enrichment (metadata), filtering and so on.

Fluentd was born to solve Logging problems as a whole, not only for standalone applications but also for distributed architectures where each running application and system have their own way to solve logging, integration between all components and the ability to move data from one place to another in a secure and reliable way was a requirement from day one.. and it continue to be as of today. That’s why it has been adopted by thousands of companies and thanks to it growing community around the world demonstrate that Fluentd became the Industry Standard for Logging.

Fast iterations and solving the problem better than yesterday is our mantra, that’s why the global team of maintainers is proud to announce that Fluentd v1.0 has been released!, this is a big milestone for everyone around the Fluentd Ecosystem which means much more that a number, it’s a maturity resulting of years of work in the community where feedback, ideas and general testing have been the roots for it growth. So thank all you who have been involved on this process!

What’s Hot in Fluentd v1.0 ?

Fluentd v1.0 built on top of v0.14-stable, some of the biggest changes on this new series are:

  • Core:
    • Multiprocess Workers: take advantage of SMP systems
    • Sub-second time resolution: all log records now have a granular time resolution
  • Portability: Windows Support has finally arrived to Fluentd.
  • New plugins API: Our biggest contributions to Fluentd ecosystem is through plugins, with more than 700 plugins available made by the community we have focused into improve the developer experience.
  • Data Management: new internal buffers can optionally enable compressions to save disk space.
  • Networking:
    • New Fluentd Forward Protocol v1: includes authentication using shared keys and authorizations through username/password.
    • Native Transport-Layer-Security (TLS) support

These changes are not the only ones, there many improvements around performance, portability and flexibility for data management.

Monitoring and Data Streaming

Fluentd is more than a project, it’s a full ecosystem and integration with third party components is fundamental, that’s why as part of our Fluentd v1.0 release we are proud to announce also the continuous investment in integration in Prometheus (monitoring) and Apache Kafka (data streaming) within many others.

Prometheus makes easier monitoring and having Fluentd provide native support for it has been in high demand in the last time and we are happy to announce that fluent-plugin-prometheus is now officially part of Fluentd Ecosystem hosted on CNCF Fluent organization on Github.

Data streaming is such important as monitoring, and companies around are looking for ways to integrate more components where Logging can be a critical compoment of the data pipeline. Fluentd is getting better and better at it: Fluentd and Apache Kafka can talk each other smoothly and securely.

What’s Next

Next year we will continue working towards performance improvements and connectors that makes easier to hook Fluentd on any place. As well from an ecosystem perspective, Fluent Bit, our lightweight log processor will keep growing in terms of capabilities for cloud native environments such as like load balancing, persistent queues and monitoring within others.

2018 will be an exciting journey, don’t hesitate to be part of it!

Connect at CloudNativeCon + KubeCon

If you are attending KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America this week, please join us December 6th for a Fluentd Salon, our community will be presenting the following lightning talks:

  • “Moving Data at Scale” by Sadayuki Furuhashi (Fluentd Creator)
  • “Fluentd and Kafka” by Masahiro Nakagawa (Fluentd Maintainer)
  • “Fluentd and Prometheus” by Yuki Ito (Fluentd Maintainer)
  • “Fluent Bit” by Eduardo Silva (Fluent Bit Maintainer)
  • “Plugging into fluent-bit: how to use plugin templates to customize fluent-bit to serve your needs” by Yeni Capote, Samsung SDS

we will also discuss Fluentd v1.0, roadmap and tools around the Fluent ecosystem plus an open space for discussions. Additionally, do not miss the additional sessions on Fluentd:

Closing Thoughts

Reaching v1.0 for us it’s a new begginning, we will continue working together with our end-users, community and companies around to make Fluentd better for 2018. If you are around CloudNativeCon+KubeCon don’t hesitate to contact us in our sessions or during the break ours, come and join us!, you can also help to solve the problem better than yesterday !

Let’s keep improving the Logging Standard…

Today, we’re pleased to announce that containerd (pronounced Con-Tay-Ner-D), an industry-standard runtime for building container solutions, has reached its 1.0 milestone. From Docker’s announcement in December of last year that it was spinning out its core runtime to its donation to the CNCF in March 2017, the containerd project has experienced significant growth and progress over the past 12 months. Within both the Docker and Kubernetes communities,  there has been a significant uptick in investment with contributions from independents and CNCF member companies alike including Docker, Google, NTT, IBM, Microsoft, AWS, ZTE, Huawei and ZJU.

Similarly, the maintainers have been working to add key functionality to containerd.  The initial containerd donation included methods for:

  • transferring container images,
  • container execution and supervision,
  • low-level local storage and network interfaces and
  • the ability to work on both Linux, Windows and other platforms.

Additional work has been done to add a:

  • complete storage and distribution system that supports both OCI and Docker image formats and
  • robust events system
  • A more sophisticated snapshot model to manage container filesystems

These changes helped the team build out a smaller interface for the snapshotters, while still fulfilling the requirements needed from things like a builder. It also reduces the amount of code needed, making it much easier to maintain in the long run.

The containerd 1.0 milestone comes after several months of in alpha and beta status, that allowed the team to implement many performance improvements: creation of a stress testing system, improvements in garbage collection and shim memory usage.

“In 2017 key functionality has been added containerd to address the needs of modern container platforms like Docker and orchestration systems like Kubernetes,” said Michael Crosby, Maintainer for containerd and engineer at Docker. “Since our announcement in December, we have been progressing the design of the project with the goal of making it easily embeddable in higher level systems to provide core container capabilities. We will continue to work with the community to create a runtime that’s lightweight yet powerful, balancing new functionality with the desire for code that is easy to support and maintain.”

containerd is already being used by Kubernetes for its cri-containerd project, which enables users to run Kubernetes clusters using containerd as the underlying runtime. containerd is also an essential upstream component of the Docker platform and is currently used by millions of end users. There is also strong alignment with other CNCF projects: containerd exposes an API using gRPC and exposes metrics in the Prometheus format. containerd also fully leverages the Open Container Initiative (OCI) runtime, image format specifications and OCI reference implementation (runC), and will pursue OCI certification when it is available.

Key Milestones in the progress to 1.0 include:

 

Notable containerd facts and figures:

  • 1922 GitHub stars, 401 forks
  • 108 contributors
  • 8 maintainers from independents and and member companies alike including Docker, Google, IBM, ZTE and ZJU .
  • 2949+ commits, 26 releases

Availability and Resources

To participate in containerd: https://github.com/docker/containerd/ .

Meet us at KubeCon

Learn more about containerd at KubeCon by attending Justin Cormack’s LinuxKit & Kubernetes talk at Austin Docker Meetup, Patrick Chanezon’s Moby session Phil Estes’ session or the containerd salon.

By John Belamaric. Originally posted on CoreDNS.io

We are pleased to announce the release of CoreDNS-1.0.0!

Release 1.0.0 and other recent releases have focused on improving the performance and functionality of the kubernetes plugin, since CoreDNS is now on track to eventually replace kube-dns as the default cluster DNS in Kubernetes.

As part of the Kubernetes proposal, we have shown that CoreDNS not only provides more functionality than kube-dns, but performs much better while using less memory. In our tests,CoreDNS running against a cluster with 5000 services was able to process 18,000 queries per second using 73MB of RAM, while kube-dns achieved 7,000qps using 97MB of RAM. This can be partial ascribed to CoreDNS simpler runtime – a single process instead of a combination of several processes.

CoreDNS also implements a number of Kubernetes-related features that are not part of kube-dns, including:

  • Filtering of records by namespace
  • Filtering of records by label selector
  • pods verified mode, which ensures that a Pod exists before returning an answer for a pod.cluster.local query
  • endpoint_pod_names which uses Pod names for service endpoint records if the hostname is not set
  • autopath which provides a server-side implementation of the namespace-specific search path. This can cut down the query latency from pods dramatically.

As a general-purpose DNS server, CoreDNS also enables many other use cases that would be difficult or impossible to achieve with kube-dns, such as the ability to create custom DNS entries.

We are excited to continue our contributions to the Kubernetes community, and CoreDNS is being incorporated as a 1.9 alpha feature into a variety of Kubernetes deployment mechanisms, including upcoming versions of kubeadmkopsminikube, and kubespray.

Of course, there is more to 1.0.0 than just the Kubernetes work. See below for the details on all the changes.

Core

  • Fixed a bug in the gRPC server that prevented dnstap from working with it.
  • Additional fuzz testing to ferret out obscure bugs.
  • Documentation and configuration cleanups.

Plugins

  • log no longer accepts stdout in the configuration (use of a file was removed in a previous release). All logging is always to STDOUT. This is a backwards incompatible change, so be sure to check your Corefile for this.
  • health now checks plugins that support it for health and reflects that in the server health.
  • kubernetes now shows healthy only after the initial API sync is complete.
  • kubernetes has bug fixes and performance improvements.
  • kubernetes now has an option to use pod names instead of IPs in service endpoint records when the hostname is not set.
  • metrics have been revised to provide better histograms. You will need to change your Prometheus queries as metric names have changed to comply with Prometheus best practices.
  • erratic now supports the health check.

Contributors

The following people helped with getting this release done: Andy Goldstein, Ben Kochie, Brian Akins, Chris O’Haver, Christian Nilsson, John Belamaric, Max Schmitt, Michael Grosser, Miek Gieben, Ruslan Drozhdzh, Uladzimir Trehubenka, Yong Tang.

If you want to help, please check out one of the issues and start coding!

For documentation and help, see our community page.

John Belamaric   
Published: and tagged 1.0.0Notes and Release using 503 words.

DevOps Expert Joins CNCF to Further Best Practices for Cloud Native Operations

SAN FRANCISCO – December 4, 2017 – The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), which sustains and integrates open source technologies like Kubernetes and Prometheus, today announced that JFrog joined the Foundation as a Gold Member. A big proponent of open source and cloud native technologies, JFrog leverages technologies like Kubernetes to help its more than 4,000 customers build and release software in a fast, reliable, and secure manner.

“CNCF is excited to have JFrog on board as a Gold Member, further embracing their commitment to open source and the cloud native community,” said Dan Kohn, Executive Director of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. “JFrog has been a part of the open source community for some time and has implemented many cloud native technologies. We appreciate JFrog investing engineering time and financial resources into CNCF projects and initiatives.”

Operated from California, Seattle, Israel, India, Spain and France, the company helps organizations of all sizes to improve software releases. Created by open source developers for the open source community, JFrog’s product and engineering teams are dedicated to OSS technologies and working on cloud native projects. JFrog is a significant contributor in the developer community with the offer of an open source version of Artifactory, the universal binary repository, and fully sponsored cloud infrastructure and commercial accounts for OSS projects with Bintray, the universal binary distribution platform. With over 2 billion downloads per month on Bintray and 60,000 OSS Artifactory servers, JFrog provides the community with the entire lifecycle for effective binary management.

As the company joins CNCF it will introduce support for Helm repositories in Artifactory with the next version release scheduled for December. Consistent with the goal to provide the only Universal artifact support, JFrog Artifactory will now enable developers to build with Kubernetes open-source system. JFrog has been using Kubernetes for development of its products, as well as actively migrating hosted operations to Kubernetes; and the addition of Helm support is considered the next logical step for JFrog and for the community.

“We know that ‘cloud native’ is more than a buzzword, it’s all about better software design and implementation,” said Kit Merker, JFrog VP of Business Development and supporter of Kubernetes open source project during his days as Google product manager for Kubernetes. “For us, joining CNCF is more than just supporting the open source community, it also signals that we are committed to bringing real engineering power to these important projects. Our goal is to contribute significantly to Kubernetes and related projects using our practical experience of creating rapid-delivery software systems.”

As a CNCF member, JFrog plans to allocate resources to support documentation and maintenance of CNCF projects, as well as help promote best practices for cloud native operations.

Additional Resources

About Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Cloud native computing uses an open source software stack to deploy applications as microservices, packaging each part into its own container, and dynamically orchestrating those containers to optimize resource utilization. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts critical components of cloud native software stacks including Kubernetes, Fluentd, linkerd, Prometheus, OpenTracing, gRPC, CoreDNS, containerd, rkt, CNI, Envoy, Jaeger, Notary, and TUF. CNCF serves as the neutral home for collaboration and brings together the industry’s top developers, end users and vendors – including the six largest public cloud providers and many of the leading private cloud companies. CNCF is part of The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization. For more information about CNCF, please visit: https://cncf.io/.

About JFrog:

With more than 4,000 customers and over 2 billion downloads per month on its binaries hub, JFrog is the leading universal solution for the management and distribution of software binaries. JFrog’s four products, JFrog Artifactory, the Universal Artifact Repository; JFrog Bintray, the Universal Distribution Platform; JFrog Mission Control, for Universal DevOps Flow Management; and JFrog Xray, Universal Component Analyzer, are used by Dev and DevOps engineers worldwide and are available as open-source, on-premise, and SaaS cloud solutions. Customers include some of the world’s top brands, such as Amazon, Google, Uber, Netflix, Twitter, Cisco, Oracle, Adobe, Salesforce, VMware, and Slack. The company is privately held and operated from California, Seattle, Israel, India, and France. More information can be found at jfrog.com.

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“Cloud Native Computing Foundation”, “CNCF” and “Kubernetes” are registered trademarks of The Linux Foundation in the United States and other countries. “Certified Kubernetes” and the Certified Kubernetes design are trademarks of The Linux Foundation in the United States and other countries.

Media Contact

Natasha Woods

The Linux Foundation

(415) 312-5289

PR@CNCF.io

Program Ensures Portability and Interoperability Across the Kubernetes Ecosystem

SAN FRANCISCO – November 13, 2017 – The Cloud Native Computing Foundation® (CNCF®), which sustains and integrates open source technologies like Kubernetes® and Prometheus, today announced availability of the Certified Kubernetes Conformance Program, which ensures Certified Kubernetes™ products deliver consistency and portability, and that 32 Certified Kubernetes Distributions and Platforms are now available.

Over the last three years, Kubernetes has been adopted by a vibrant, diverse community of providers. As part of the new program, vendors use an automated test suite to demonstrate their conformance and CNCF certifies their submission.

The following products have passed the Certified Kubernetes conformance program:

  • Alibaba Cloud, Alibaba Cloud Container Service
  • Apprenda, Kismatic Enterprise Toolkit (KET)
  • Appscode, Pharmer
  • Caicloud, Compass
  • Canonical, Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes
  • Cisco Systems, Cisco Container Platform
  • Cloud Foundry Foundation, Cloud Foundry Container Runtime
  • CoreOS, Tectonic
  • DaoCloud, DaoCloud Enterprise
  • Docker, Docker Enterprise Edition
  • Google, Google Kubernetes Engine
  • Heptio, AWS-Quickstart
  • Huawei, Huawei Cloud Container Engine
  • IBM, IBM Cloud Container Service and IBM Cloud Private
  • Loodse, Kubermatic Container Engine
  • Mesosphere, Kubernetes on DC/OS
  • Microsoft, Azure ACS-Engine
  • Mirantis, Mirantis Cloud Platform
  • Netease, Netease Container Service Dedicated
  • Oracle, Oracle Container Engine, Oracle Linux, Oracle Terraform Kubernetes Installer
  • Pivotal Software, Pivotal Container Service (PKS)
  • Poseidon, Typhoon
  • Rancher, Inc., Rancher Kubernetes
  • Red Hat, OpenShift
  • SAP, Cloud Platform – Gardener
  • SUSE, SUSE CaaS (Container as a Service) Platform
  • Samsung SDS, Kraken
  • StackPointCloud, Stackpoint.io
  • Tencent Cloud, Tencent Cloud Container Service
  • VMware, Pivotal Container Service (PKS)
  • Weaveworks, kubeadm
  • Wise2C Technology, WiseCloud

“The new Certified Kubernetes Conformance Program gives enterprise organizations the confidence that workloads that run on any Certified Kubernetes Distribution or Platform will work correctly on any other version,” said Dan Kohn, Executive Director, Cloud Native Computing Foundation. “The interoperability that this program ensures is essential to Kubernetes meeting its promise of offering a single open source software stack supported by many vendors that can deploy on any public, private or hybrid cloud.”

A Certified Kubernetes product guarantees that the complete Kubernetes API functions as specified, so users can rely on a seamless, stable experience.

Certified Kubernetes implementations are permitted to use the new Certified Kubernetes logo and also are allowed to use the Kubernetes mark in combination with their product name (e.g., XYZ Kubernetes Service). Development of the certification program involved close collaboration between CNCF and the rest of the Kubernetes community, especially the Testing and Architecture Special Interest Groups (SIGs).

The Kubernetes Architecture SIG is the final arbiter of the definition of API conformance for the program. The program also includes strong guarantees that commercial providers of Kubernetes will continue to release new versions to ensure that customers can take advantage of the rapid pace of ongoing development. Kubernetes is one of the highest velocity software projects in the history of open source.

Vendor quotes:

Alibaba Cloud: “We believe Kubernetes is one of the key enabling technologies for a hybrid cloud application platform,” said Hong Tang, Chief Architect of Alibaba Cloud. “The conformance certification is important to ensure workload portability across different Kubernetes offerings. As always, Alibaba Cloud is committed to the open container ecosystems and communities.”

Cisco: “Cisco has certified its container platform using the Certified Kubernetes Conformance Program. The certification program provides Cisco’s customers with the confidence of a consistent Kubernetes environment,” said Lew Tucker, Vice President and CTO, Cloud Computing, at Cisco.

CoreOS: “The introduction of the Kubernetes Conformance certification program shows the maturity of the project and the validation of the vendor ecosystem that prioritizes enabling a reliable and consistent experience for Kubernetes consumers. We at CoreOS have ensured that Tectonic, our leading enterprise-ready Kubernetes platform, has achieved compliance,” said Reza Shafii, VP of product, CoreOS.

Docker: “By achieving certification through the Kubernetes Software Conformance program, we offer organizations a Kubernetes-certified platform to deploy Linux or Windows-based applications across a secure and automated supply chain operating in hybrid cloud environments,” said Banjot Chanana, Head of Product Management for Docker. “Docker Enterprise Edition (Docker EE) offers an unmodified version of Kubernetes with the added value of the Docker platform including security, management, a familiar developer workflow and tooling, broad ecosystem compatibility and an adherence to industry standards.”

Google: “From the day Google first open-sourced Kubernetes, the goal has been to provide a highly portable cloud native platform for developers to quickly deploy services on premises, in public cloud, and in hybrid environments,” said Eyal Manor, VP Engineering, Google Cloud. The Certified Kubernetes Conformance Program is a way for vendors to prove they are offering pure Kubernetes, with continuous, seamless upgrades, giving users assurance that they can continue to benefit from the innovation and portability Kubernetes offers. We continue to provide that experience in Google Kubernetes Engine.”

Huawei: “Huawei is proud to be part of the initial wave of certified cloud vendors for the recently instituted CNCF Certified Kubernetes Conformance Program,” said Jiayongli, VP of PaaS Product department of Cloud BU at Huawei. “With this stamp of approval from CNCF, Huawei underscores its commitment to our customers and partners around a consistent and portable Huawei Cloud Services as part of our overall vision towards a truly open source cloud technology. This demonstrates the brand integrity and fosters confidence and strength of Huawei’s underlying cloud platform capabilities.”

IBM: “The pace of Kubernetes adoption among developers has been unprecedented, which is why we’ve made it a core component of both the IBM Cloud Container Service and IBM Cloud Private offerings,” said Jason McGee, IBM Fellow, VP and CTO, IBM Cloud. “By certifying our Kubernetes-based technologies with the open community’s interoperability standards, IBM is investing in the future of Kubernetes, and making it easier for developers to deliver innovation from their data and apps across IBM Cloud and other platforms.”

Mesosphere: “We are thrilled to see the introduction of the Certified Kubernetes program to ensure its consistency and safeguard against forks of the project that degrade the user experience,” said Tobi Knaup, CTO and Co-founder, Mesosphere. “At Mesosphere, we are committed to enabling teams to easily install and operate 100-percent pure Kubernetes clusters that are highly available, secure by default, and integrate easily with the production-grade data services that DC/OS has to offer.”

Microsoft: “Microsoft’s commitment to Kubernetes spans multiple product offerings, and we will add AKS, our new managed Kubernetes service, to our list of compliant services in the coming weeks,”  Gabe Monroy, Lead Program Manager, Containers, Microsoft Azure. “We’re all in on providing the absolute best experience for our customers seeking a reliable, scalable, and portable environment for their containerized workloads.”

Mirantis: “With September’s release of the latest Mirantis Cloud Platform, we fully embraced Kubernetes as part of our march to introduce new container services to our managed open cloud portfolio as the open source projects behind them become more mature,” said Nick Chase, Mirantis Head of Technical and Marketing Content. “The Certified Kubernetes program enables customers to be confident in the interoperability of the product or service that they choose, which is crucial in this multi-cloud world.”

Oracle: “The Certified Kubernetes program is a huge step forward in ensuring consistency and portability for developers no matter where the Kubernetes platform is running – in the cloud, across clouds, on premise, or locally on your laptop,” said TJ Fontaine, Oracle Technical Lead, Kubernetes Project. “With Oracle Container Engine, Oracle Terraform Kubernetes Installer, and Oracle Linux Container Services for use with Kubernetes, we are excited to be part of this first group of vendors certified under the Certified Kubernetes Conformance Program and look forward to helping the Cloud Native Computing Foundation further the adoption of Kubernetes across the industry.”

Pivotal Software: “Pivotal and VMware, in collaboration with Google Cloud, recently announced Pivotal Container Service, a powerful new way to deploy and operate Kubernetes,” said Ian Andrews, Vice President of Products, Pivotal Software. “PKS enables Global 2000 companies to deliver production-ready Kubernetes across private and public clouds, with constant compatibility to Google Kubernetes Engine (GKE). The Certified Kubernetes Conformance Program gives our customers even more confidence that PKS will help them operationalize Kubernetes reliably and securely at scale.”

Red Hat: “Core to Red Hat is our belief in both an upstream first development model and the potential for cross-community collaborative development to deliver standardization to the technology industry,” said Chris Wright, Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, Red Hat. “Through open source innovation and as a champion for open standards, Red Hat is helping customers around the world embrace container technologies, including Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, a leading enterprise distribution of Kubernetes.”

SAP: “Kubernetes radically simplifies the task of building, deploying, and maintaining distributed systems. It plays an important role in SAP’s multi-cloud and open platform strategy. As a key functionality of SAP Cloud Platform, it will allow customers and partners to run their digital transformation workloads on SAP Cloud Platform deployed in SAP’s data centers or on their preferred hyperscale cloud provider. Certified Kubernetes environments ensure portability of our customer and partner applications across our various deployment options,” said Björn Goerke, President, SAP Cloud Platform and CTO, SAP SE.

SUSE: “SUSE has long been committed to providing our customers with open source technologies and a no-lock-in business model,” said Alan Clark, Director of Industry Initiatives, Emerging Standards and Open Source at SUSE. “Now, Kubernetes conformance certification of SUSE CaaS Platform solidifies our ability to carry that value into the emerging application delivery domain, where assurances of interoperability are especially critical, given the rapid pace of technology advancement and market evolution. It’s a win-win for SUSE and our customers.”

Samsung SDS: “Samsung SDS places high value on the conformance of our Kubernetes tooling with the community standards for portability, interoperability, upgradeability and predictability,” said Aaron Crickenberger, Samsung SDS Senior Technologist and Kubernetes Steering Committee Member. “The Certified Kubernetes Conformance Program, an important part of our validation procedures, increases confidence for any system admin using our Kraken build/deployment system to reliably maintain and operate their clusters from upstream Kubernetes releases.”

Tencent: “Tencent Cloud’s CCS (Cloud Container Service) has always been committed to enhancing user experience and maintaining consistency, said TianFu Wang, Senior Staff Engineer at Tencent Cloud. “The Certified Kubernetes Conformance Program is an important milestone for us to guarantee consistency and portability of our customer. The certification demonstrates that any services deployed on Tencent’s CCS platform ensures portability and reliability, as well as provides great security through seamless upgradeability.”

VMWare: “The Certified Kubernetes Conformance Program offers enterprises peace of mind that Certified Kubernetes products provide true consistency and workload portability,” said Paul Dul, Vice President of Product Management, Cloud-Native Apps, VMware. “In collaboration with Pivotal, we’re proud to announce that the initial release of Pivotal Container Service (PKS) will be certified out of the gate. We’re committed to rapidly adopting the latest Kubernetes releases and  providing enterprises with a seamless upgrade experience, enabling them to take advantage of the innovation in future releases.”

Any vendor is invited to run the conformance test suite and submit conformance testing results for review and certification by the CNCF. End users should make sure their vendor partners certify their Kubernetes product and can confirm that certification using the same open source test suite.

Additional Resources

About Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Cloud native computing uses an open source software stack to deploy applications as microservices, packaging each part into its own container, and dynamically orchestrating those containers to optimize resource utilization. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts critical components of cloud native software stacks including Kubernetes, Fluentd, linkerd, Prometheus, OpenTracing, gRPC, CoreDNS, containerd, rkt, CNI, Envoy, Jaeger, Notary, and TUF. CNCF serves as the neutral home for collaboration and brings together the industry’s top developers, end users and vendors – including the six largest public cloud providers and many of the leading private cloud companies. CNCF is part of The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization. For more information about CNCF, please visit: https://cncf.io/.

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“Cloud Native Computing Foundation”, “CNCF” and “Kubernetes” are registered trademarks of The Linux Foundation in the United States and other countries. “Certified Kubernetes” and the Certified Kubernetes design are trademarks of The Linux Foundation in the United States and other countries.

Media Contact

Natasha Woods

The Linux Foundation

(415) 312-5289

PR@CNCF.io

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OS Summit keynotes

Watch keynotes and technical sessions from OS Summit and ELC Europe here.

If you weren’t able to attend Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) Europe last week, don’t worry! We’ve recorded keynote presentations from both events and all the technical sessions from ELC Europe to share with you here.

Check out the on-stage conversation with Linus Torvalds and VMware’s Dirk Hohndel, opening remarks from The Linux Foundation’s Executive Director Jim Zemlin, and a special presentation from 11-year-old CyberShaolin founder Reuben Paul. You can watch these and other ELC and OS Summit keynotes below for insight into open source collaboration, community and technical expertise on containers, cloud computing, embedded Linux, Linux kernel, networking, and much more.

And, you can watch all 55+ technical sessions from Embedded Linux Conference here.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLQZzEvavGs&list=PLbzoR-pLrL6pISWAq-1cXP4_UZAyRtesk&index=1″][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video 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Riyaz Faizullabhoy, Docker Security Engineer, today announced on stage at Open Source Summit Europe, that the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) Technical Oversight Committee (TOC) has voted Notary in as our 13th hosted project and TUF in as our 14th hosted project.

“With every project presented to the CNCF, the TOC evaluates what that project provides to the cloud native ecosystem,” said Chris Aniszczyk, COO of Cloud Native Computing Foundation. “Notary and the TUF specification address a key challenge for enterprises working with containers by providing a solution for trusted, cross-platform delivery of content. We are excited to have these projects come in as one collective contribution to CNCF and look forward to cultivating their communities.”

Notary Based on The Update Framework (TUF) specification

Docker Platform including Enterprise Edition and Community Edition, Moby Project, Huawei, Motorola Solutions, VMWare, LinuxKit, Quay, and Kubernetes have all integrated Notary/TUF.

Originally created by Docker in June 2015, Notary is based on The Update Framework (TUF) specification, a secure general design for the problem of software distribution and updates. TUF helps developers to secure new or existing software update systems, which are often found to be vulnerable to many known attacks. TUF addresses this widespread problem by providing a comprehensive, flexible security framework that developers can integrate with any software update system.

Notary is one of the industry’s most mature implementations of the TUF specification and its Go implementation is used today to provide robust security for container image updates, even in the face of a registry compromise. Notary takes care of the operations necessary to create, manage, and distribute the metadata needed to ensure the integrity and freshness of user content. Notary/TUF provides both a client, and a pair of server applications to host signed metadata and perform limited online signing functions.

Image 1: Diagram illustrates the interactions between the Notary client, server, and signer

It is also beginning to gain traction outside the container ecosystem as platforms like Kolide use Notary to secure distribution of osquery through their auto-updater.

“In a developer’s workflow, security can often be an afterthought; however, every piece of deployed code from the OS to the application should be signed. Notary establishes strong trust guarantees to prevent malicious content from being injected into the workflow processes,” said David Lawrence, Senior Software Engineer at Docker. “Notary is a widely used implementation in the container space. By joining CNCF, we hope Notary will be more widely adopted and different use cases will emerge.”

Notary joins the following CNCF projects Kubernetes, Prometheus, OpenTracing, Fluentd, linkerd, gRPC, CoreDNS, containerd, rkt, CNI, Envoy, and Jaeger.

Use Case Examples of Notary:

  • Docker uses Notary to implement Docker Content Trust and all of the docker trust subcommands.
  • Quay is using Notary as a library, wrapping it and extending it to suit their needs. For Quay, Notary is flexible rather than single-purpose.
  • CloudFlare’s PAL tool uses Notary for container identity, allowing one to associate metadata such as secrets to running containers in a verifiable manner.
  • LinuxKit is using Notary to distribute its kernels and system packages.

Notable Notary Milestones:

  • 865 GitHub stars, 156 forks
  • 45 contributors
  • 8 maintainers from 3 companies; Docker, CoreOS, Huawei
  • 2600+ commits, 34 releases

TUF

TUF (The Update Framework) is an open source specification that was written in 2009 by Professor Justin Cappos and developed further by members of the Professor Cappos’s Secure Systems Lab at NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering.

TUF is designed to work as part of a larger software distribution framework and provides resilience to key or server compromises. Using a variety of cryptographic keys for content signing and verification, TUF allows security to remain as strong as is practical against a variety of different classes of attacks.

TUF is used in production by Docker, LEAP, App Container, Flynn, OTAInfo, ATS Solutions, and VMware.

“In addition to focusing on security, one of our primary goals has been to operate securely within the workflow that groups already use on their repositories,” said Professor Cappos. “We have learned a tremendous amount by working with Docker, CoreOS, OCaml, Python, Rust, and automotive vendors to tune TUF to work better in their environments.”

TUF has a variety of use cases beyond containers. For example, several different companies in the automotive industry have integrated a TUF-variant called Uptane, with more integrations underway. As a result, Uptane was recently named one of Popular Science’s Top 100 Technologies of the Year. There is also a lot of momentum toward adoption by different programming language software repositories, including standardization by Python (PEP 458 and 480). TUF has also been security audited by multiple groups.

Notable TUF Milestones:

  • Open source since 2010
  • 517 GitHub stars, 74 forks
  • 27+ contributors from CoreOS, Docker, OCaml, Python, Rust (ATS Solutions) and Tor
  • 2700+ commits

As CNCF hosted projects, Notary and TUF will be part of a neutral community aligned with technical interests. The CNCF will also assist Notary and TUF with marketing and documentation efforts as well as help grow their communities.

“The inclusion of Notary and TUF into the CNCF is an important milestone as it is the first project to address concerns regarding the trusted delivery of content for containerized applications,” said Solomon Hykes, Founder and CTO at Docker and CNCF TOC project sponsor. “Notary is already at the heart of several security initiatives throughout the container ecosystem and with this donation, it will be even more accessible as a building block for broader community collaboration.”

For more on Notary, check out the release blog for Notary and Docker Content Trust, as well as Docker’s Notary doc pages and read Getting Started with Notary and Understand the Notary service architecture. For more on TUF, check out The Updated Framework page and watch Professor Cappos in this video and this conference presentation video.

Stay up to date on all CNCF happenings by signing up for our monthly newsletter.

Oracle Furthers Commitment to Kubernetes and the Cloud Native Community

LOS ANGELES – September 13, 2017 – Open Source Summit – The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), which is sustaining and integrating open source technologies like Kubernetes and Prometheus, today announced Oracle has joined CNCF as a platinum member to help make cloud native and container adoption easier for the enterprise.

Developers are rapidly embracing cloud native as a way to solve business problems quickly and gain immediate value. According to Redmonk, 71 percent of the Fortune 100 use containers and more than 50 percent of Fortune 100 companies use Kubernetes as their container orchestration platform.

“Kubernetes is the future of cloud container orchestration and management, and Oracle is committed to improving the technology to make enterprise adoption easier than ever,” said Mark Cavage, Vice President of Software Development at Oracle. “Oracle uses Kubernetes internally and dedicates significant engineering resources to the project. We have also recently open sourced a Kubernetes installer for Oracle Cloud Infrastructure and released Kubernetes on Oracle Linux. Formally joining the Cloud Native Computing Foundation signals an even deeper commitment to Kubernetes and CNCF community participation.”

Kubernetes helps Oracle internally manage its container infrastructure to deploy and run its own cloud services. The company’s work involving the Kubernetes ecosystem is available here on GitHub. Oracle engineers are also working with the Kubernetes testing community, providing code contributions related to running clusters globally, federation and security, and helping to answer questions on Slack, StackOverflow, and GitHub.  Oracle also works with Canonical Kubernetes and CoreOS Tectonic to make Kubernetes more accessible and easier to consume for the broader enterprise community.

“The movement to the cloud has been the biggest trend in enterprise computing in the last decade,” said Chris Aniszczyk, Chief Operating Officer of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. “Using containers in a cloud native architecture is the next phase, with an open source stack enabling portability between public, private and hybrid clouds. Oracle’s participation as a platinum member is a testament to how quickly the market is adopting these technologies. With Oracle rapidly growing its cloud business, its expertise working with enterprises of all sizes will benefit the larger cloud native ecosystem.”

As part of Oracle’s Platinum membership, Jon Mittelhauser has joined CNCF’s Governing Board. The company also plans to participate in CNCF Working Groups such as the Serverless WG.

Oracle has invested significant resources in developing, testing, optimizing, and supporting open source technologies such as MySQL, GlassFish, Java, Linux, PHP, Apache, Eclipse, Berkeley DB, NetBeans, VirtualBox, and Xen. A Linux Foundation platinum member since 2008, Oracle serves on its board of directors and participates in a number of other Linux Foundation projects, including the Open Container Initiative (OCI), Xen Project, Hyperledger, Automotive Grade Linux, and the R Consortium.

Additional Resources

 

About Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Cloud native computing uses an open source software stack to deploy applications as microservices, packaging each part into its own container, and dynamically orchestrating those containers to optimize resource utilization. The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) hosts critical components of those software stacks including Kubernetes, Fluentd, linkerd, Prometheus, OpenTracing, gRPC, CoreDNS, containerd, rkt and CNI. CNCF serves as the neutral home for collaboration and brings together the industry’s top developers, end users and vendors – including the six largest public cloud providers and many of the leading private cloud companies. CNCF is part of The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization. For more information about CNCF, please visit: https://cncf.io/.