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Open Source Summit

Only two weeks left to submit your talk for Open Source Summit North America.

Submit a proposal to speak at Open Source Summit North America taking place August 29-31, in Vancouver, B.C., and share your knowledge and expertise with 2,000+ open source technologists and community members. Proposals are being accepted through 11:59pm PDT, Sunday, April 29.

This year’s tracks/content will cover the following areas:

  • Cloud Native Apps/Serverless/Microservices
  • Infrastructure & Automation (Cloud/Cloud Native/DevOps)
  • Linux Systems
  • Artificial Intelligence & Data Analytics
  • Emerging Technologies & Wildcard (Networking, Edge, IoT, Hardware, Blockchain)
  • Community, Compliance, Governance, Culture, Open Source Program Management (Open Collaboration Conference track)
  • Diversity & Inclusion (Diversity Empowerment Summit)
  • Innovation at Apache/in Apache Projects (Apache Software Foundation track)
  • Cloud & Container Apprentice Linux Engineer Tutorials Track (geared towards attendees new to using Linux and open source based cloud & container technologies)

View the full list of suggested topics, learn more about the 2018 Program Chairs, Track Chairs, and Program Committee, and submit now >>

SUBMIT YOUR TALK

Not submitting, but planning to attend? Register now and save $300 with early bird pricing.

Interested in sponsoring?

Showcase your thought leadership among a vibrant open source community and connect with top influencers driving today’s technology purchasing decisions. Learn more »

LC3

LC3 Schedule Announced | Register Now to Save $90USD/505RMB | 日程表已公布 | 立即注册可节省 90 美元/ 505 元人民币

Join us in Beijing June 25 – 27, for three days of education across 175+ sessions, collaboration opportunities with open source technologists and professionals from around the globe, and the chance to learn about the newest trends and topics in open source.

Conference tracks include:

  • Cloud Native, Serverless & Microservices
  • Infrastructure & Automation for Cloud, Cloud Native & DevOps
  • Artificial Intelligence & Deep Learning
  • Internet of Things & M2M
  • Linux Systems & Development
  • Networking & Orchestration
  • Blockchain
  • Emerging Technologies & Wildcard
  • KVM
  • Open Source Leadership

In addition, LC3 will feature an Executive Business Leadership track on Tuesday, June 26. The schedule for this track will be announced shortly.

VIEW THE FULL SCHEDULE 

Keynote speakers include:

  • Kelsey Hightower, Developer Advocate, Google
  • Abby Kearns, Executive Director, Cloud Foundry Foundation
  • Greg Kroah-Hartman, Linux Kernel Maintainer
  • Michelle Noorali, Senior Software Engineer, Microsoft
  • Linus Torvalds, Creator of Linux & Git, in conversation with Dirk Hohndel, VP & Chief Open Source Officer, VMware
  • Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation

Additional keynotes from companies including Alibaba, Baidu, Huawei, Intel and SUSE will be announced shortly.

REGISTER NOW

Need assistance convincing your manager? Here’s a letter that can help you make the request to attend LC3. Register now to save $90USD/505RMB through April 30.

参加 LC3 在北京召开的为期三天(6 月 25 日至 27 日)的开源教育与合作会议。

参加我们将于 6 月 25 日至 27 日在北京召开的为期三天的 超过175场的会议,与来自世界各地的开源技术专家和专业人士进行合作,并有机会了解开源的最新趋势和主题。

会议主题包括:

  • 云原生,无服务器与微服务
  • 云、云原生和 DevOps 的基础结构和自动化
  • 人工智能和深度学习
  • 物联网与 M2M
  • Linux 系统与开发
  • 网络与编制
  • 区块链
  • 新兴技术与通配符
  • KVM(基于内核的虚拟机)
  • 开源领导力

此外,LC3 将于 6 月 26 日(星期二)召开以“执行业务领导力”为主题的会议。我们将尽快公布此主题的时间表。

查看完整的时间表

主讲人包括:

  • Kelsey Hightower,开发者倡导者,Google
  • Abby Kearns,执行董事Cloud Foundry Foundation
  • Greg Kroah-Hartman,Linux 内核维护者
  • Michelle Noorali,高级软件工程师Microsoft
  • Linus Torvalds,Linux 和 Git 的创始人,并与 VMware 副总裁兼首席开发官 Dirk Hohnde 进行交谈
  • Jim Zemlin,执行总监,The Linux Foundation

近期还将公布包含阿里巴巴、百度、华为、英特尔和 SUSE 等公司的其他主题演讲。

现在注册

需要我们帮助您说服您的经理?这封信可以帮助您提出参加 LC3 的申请。4 月 30 日前注册,即可节省 90 美元/ 505 元人民币。

open source project

Matt Butcher provides tips for managing open source projects based on experience with Kubernetes Helm.

As open source technology has become more strategically important for organizations everywhere, many tech workers are choosing to or being asked to build out and oversee their own open source projects. From Google, to Netflix to Facebook, companies are also releasing their open source creations to the community. These efforts require more management than may seem apparent at first, and there is also a particular kind of “nice problem to have” that can arise. Specifically, a new open source project can suddenly take on a life of its own, growing far faster than ever imagined.

That nice problem to have was the subject of an Open Source Summit 2017 session presented by Matt Butcher, Principal Software Development Engineer at Microsoft. We covered some of his advice for open source projects in a previous post. And, here, we discuss specific project management issues Butcher has faced.

In his talk, Butcher cited examples from the Kubernetes Helm project, which grew to involve hundreds of contributors and thousands of active users in a span of 18 months..

Minefields and sparring matches

One thing Butcher and his collaborators on the Helm project learned is that managing governance and standards is an ongoing challenge. They also learned that code reviews can become “minefields of interaction,” where community members may have unexpected motives behind their messages. “I have been involved in situations where code reviews become a sparring match,” said Butcher.

“With Helm, we developed guidelines for them. They can develop in such a way that some people will just want to weigh in and show that they’re right. In some cases it’s very important to acknowledge contributions We actually have an internal rule in our core maintainers guide that says, ‘Make sure that at least one comment that you leave on a code review, if you’re asking for changes, is a positive one. It sounds really juvenile, right? But it serves a specific purpose. It lets somebody know, ‘I acknowledge that you just made a gift of your time and your resources,” he said.

Shifting perspective

Butcher also noted that team dynamics can change quickly as internal focus shifts to external focus. “At some point you’re going to release your project out into the wild, and then you’ll hit your stability marker, which might be, say, your version 1.0,” he said. “At that point your perspective changes and you say, ‘Hey, instead of huddling together to work on our team dynamics, we’re all going to face outward. That can be a touchy border to be on.”

In the case of Helm, team members reached out in unexpected ways during the early growth phase. “We did some crazy stuff when we were launching it,” Butcher said. “We actually had kind of an internal semi-formal policy that you would pair with people who came in and had big problems, which resulted in random people from the team joining meetings with people they’d never met and saying, ‘Hey, tell me about your problem and let me see if I can help.’  The whole point of this was to try and actively pull people into the community and get them engaged right away.”

Timelines are guidelines

Butcher stressed that project managers should “know what they’re building and be ruthless about sticking to it.” That means, in some cases, that timelines are guidelines. “You want to commit to timelines, because that’s respectful to the community,” he said. “On the flip side, you also are trying to keep your core contributors motivated. You don’t want them to feel undue pressure. In many cases the community understands that you are at the liberty of the contributors and sometimes something does come up. At times, we had to go back to the community and say, ‘we couldn’t do it because the Kubernetes team isn’t ready for us yet, so we’re going to have to wait a little while.”

You can learn more about open source project management in The Linux Foundation’s growing collection of Open Source Guides for the Enterprise. These free online guides cover starting an open source project, improving your open source impact, participating in open source communities, and more.

Share your knowledge and expertise at Open Source Summit North Americahappening August 29-31 in Vancouver BC. Proposals are being accepted through April 29th.

Open Source Summit

Submit your proposal to speak at OS Summit before the April 29th deadline.

Share your knowledge and expertise by speaking at Open Source Summit North America, August 29-31 in Vancouver BC. Proposals are being accepted through April 29th.

As the leading technical conference for professional open source, Open Source Summit gathers developers, sysadmins, DevOps professionals, architects and community members from across the globe for education and collaboration across the ecosystem.

As open source continues to evolve, so does the content that Open Source Summit covers, and we’re excited to announce new content areas that will be covered this year in addition to those that continue to be of critical importance to our attendees.

This year’s tracks/content will cover the following areas:

  • Cloud Native Apps/Serverless/Microservices
  • Infrastructure & Automation (Cloud / Cloud Native / DevOps)
  • Linux Systems
  • Artificial Intelligence & Data Analytics
  • Emerging Technologies & Wildcard (Networking, Edge, IoT, Hardware, Blockchain)
  • Community, Compliance, Governance, Culture, Open Source Program Management (in the Open Collaboration Conference tracks)
  • Diversity & Inclusion (in the Diversity Empowerment Summit )
  • Innovation at Apache/In Apache Projects (in the Apache Software Foundation track)
  • Cloud & Container Apprentice Linux Engineer Tutorials Track (geared towards attendees new to using Linux and open source based cloud & container technologies)

SUBMIT YOUR TALK  >>

Our program chairs are ensuring that we increase content for our sysadmin, devops and software architecture audience this year as well, based on feedback received from 2017, so please submit talks geared towards any of these audience types, as well as community managers, program office management, and of course developers.

On that note, we are pleased to announce our 2018 Program Chairs, Track Chairs and Program Committee:

Program Co-Chairs:

  • Robyn Bergeron, Ansible Community Architect, Red Hat
  • Donnie Berkholtz, VP, IT Service Delivery, Carlson Wagonlit Travel
  • Greg Kroah-Hartman, Linux Kernel Developer
  • Bryan Liles, Staff Engineer, Heptio

Track Chairs:

  • Jono Bacon, Community Strategy Consultant, Author & Speaker (Open Collaboration Conference)
  • Rich Bowen, Vice President of Conferences, Apache Software Foundation (Innovation at Apache)
  • Nithya Ruff, Senior Director, Open Source Practice, Comcast (Diversity Empowerment Summit)
  • Behan Webster, Converse in Code (Apprentice Track)

Program Committee:

  • Laura Abbott, Fedora Kernel Engineer, Red Hat
  • Zaheda Bhorat, Head of Open Source Strategy, Amazon Web Services
  • James Bottomley, Distinguished Engineer, IBM
  • Joe Brockmeier, Senior Evangelist, Linux Containers, Red Hat
  • Jessie Frazelle, Software Engineer, Microsoft
  • Michelle Noorali, Software Engineer, Microsoft
  • Daniel Whitenack, Data Scientist, Lead Developer Advocate, Pachyderm

Register & Save

Not submitting, but planning to attend? Register now and save $300 with early bird pricing.

Interested in sponsoring?

Showcase your thought leadership among a vibrant open source community and connect with top influencers driving today’s technology purchasing decisions. Learn more »

ONAP

Building an open ecosystem and accelerating operational transformation is key to the open networking industry, says Huawei’s Bill Ren.

The 2018 Open Networking Summit (ONS) is almost here. We spoke to Bill Ren, Vice President Network Industry & Ecosystem Development at Huawei recently to glean some insights on ONAP since Huawei is a founding member and top contributor to this project.

“SDN/NFV solutions have been in the market for many years but we did not see massive deployment due to lack of working standards and automation,” Bill said.

Bill Ren

Bill Ren, VP, Network Industry & Ecosystem Development, Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.

“We believe open source will help produce de facto standards faster. We need to bring automation and intelligence into networking, we need a full end to end automation platform and that is why ONAP is particularly important for networking.”

Here is what Bill had to say about the ONAP’s growing role in open networking.

Linux.com: How does adopting ONAP as a standard help all operators and vendors to innovate?

Bill: ONAP can help to set up a common framework for all operators as an onboarding resource, or to design and deploy service, manage and control the network, collect data from networks, and manage policy. Adopting ONAP as a standard means that operators can focus on service innovation rather than on the software platform itself. And, vendors can focus on innovation as ONAP removes the difficulty of OSS integration and brings an open unified marketplace for all vendors.

Linux.com: Huawei leads five of 28 ONAP projects, including SO, VNF SDK, Modeling, Integration and ONAP CLI. Why did Huawei choose those projects? What benefits do you see in those projects?

Bill: Huawei treats open source as a strategic tool to build a healthy telecom industry and we set up a dedicated management team for networking open source projects like ONAP. We chose to lead some of these projects because they are key elements in building a healthy ecosystem. Take modeling for example. Modeling aims to build common information model for network resource and service across the whole industry. This will result in simple and quick resource onboarding and OSS/BSS integration. VNF SDK aims to build common VNF packaging and marketplace. Integration aims to support multi-cloud and multi-vendor environments. SO is the core component in ONAP that links other components so that they work together.

Huawei also chose to lead these key projects because we, as an end-to-end telecom solution leader, have the necessary resources, expertise and experience to significantly contribute. For example, we can involve our global expertise in SDOs for modelling project. And we can involve our key customer to discuss use case, requirements and POC/trials. Huawei believes an open healthy ecosystem will enlarge the total market and ultimately benefit Huawei’s business.

Linux.com: What benefits do you see in being involved in the ONAP community?

Bill: We learned a lot. ONAP brings really good architecture for network automation and this will benefit our related products. ONAP brings operator and vendor together and this will help us to understand requirements much better. ONAP will even bring a chance to try some new business model in certain area like service or cloudification. I believe we will see more and more benefits over time. I believe we will see more and more benefits over time.

Linux.com: Your keynote at Open Networking Summit is “Make Infrastructure Relevant to a Better Future.” Explain that please. What has Huawei done along these lines and how well is it working?

Bill: Yes. Building an open ecosystem and accelerating operational transformation is our industry strategy. Infrastructure operators need operational transformation to be more deeply relevant to a better digital intelligent society. And open source is the strategy tool for that. My keynote at ONS will address this point.

Basically, we believe all partners in our industry, including SDOs and open source projects, operators and vendors can work together to build an open and intent-driven cloud-friendly network to empower the digital life and vertical digitalization. I am happy to see that most network related open source projects are now merged into Linux Foundation Networking (LFN) umbrella and SDOs like MEF/TMF are cooperating with LFN. I would say it moves on the right direction.

Linux.com: What are your thoughts on the Linux Foundation Networking umbrella overall?

Bill: I look forward to LFN speeding the building of the open source networking ecosystem, and Telco operation transformation. I would like to see LFN work out a clear technical vision, flexible full stack architecture, cross-domain common models, harmonized SDO cooperation and faster production and field trials. I recommend LFN set up strong Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) team, unified use case committee, and unified verification programs. I believe our industry has found a better way to work together and I look forward to another quick change and successful year for our industry.

This article was sponsored by Huawei and written by Linux.com.

Sign up to get the latest updates on ONS NA 2018!

open source project

Focusing on teamwork is important to open source projects. “It’s a collaborative effort,” says Matt Butcher.

Are you managing an open source project or considering launching one? If so, it may come as a surprise that one of the challenges you can face is rapid growth. Matt Butcher, Principal Software Development Engineer at Microsoft, addressed this issue in a presentation at Open Source Summit North America. His talk covered everything from teamwork to the importance of knowing your goals and sticking to them.

Butcher is no stranger to managing open source projects. As Microsoft invests more deeply into open source, Butcher has been involved with many projects, including toolkits for Kubernetes and QueryPath, the jQuery-like library for PHP.

Butcher described a case study involving Kubernetes Helm, a package system for Kubernetes. Helm arose from a company team-building hackathon, with an original team of three people giving birth to it. Within 18 months, the project had hundreds of contributors and thousands of active users.

Teamwork

“We were stretched to our limits as we learned to grow,” Butcher said. “When you’re trying to set up your team of core maintainers and they’re all trying to work together, you want to spend some actual time trying to optimize for a process that lets you be cooperative. You have to adjust some expectations regarding how you treat each other. When you’re working as a group of open source collaborators, the relationship is not employer/employee necessarily. It’s a collaborative effort.”

In addition to focusing on the right kinds of teamwork, Butcher and his collaborators learned that managing governance and standards is an ongoing challenge. “You want people to understand who makes decisions, how they make decisions and why they make the decisions that they make,” he said. “When we were a small project, there might have been two paragraphs in one of our documents on standards, but as a project grows and you get growing pains, these documented things gain a life of their own. They get their very own repositories, and they just keep getting bigger along with the project.”

Should all discussion surrounding a open source project go on in public, bathed in the hot lights of community scrutiny? Not necessarily, Butcher noted. “A minor thing can get blown into catastrophic proportions in a short time because of misunderstandings and because something that should have been done in private ended up being public,” he said. “Sometimes we actually make architectural recommendations as a closed group. The reason we do this is that we don’t want to miscue the community. The people who are your core maintainers are core maintainers because they’re experts, right? These are the people that have been selected from the community because they understand the project. They understand what people are trying to do with it. They understand the frustrations and concerns of users.”

Acknowledge Contributions

Butcher added that it is essential to acknowledge people’s contributions to keep the environment surrounding a fast-growing project from becoming toxic. “We actually have an internal rule in our core maintainers guide that says, ‘Make sure that at least one comment that you leave on a code review, if you’re asking for changes, is a positive one,” he said.  “It sounds really juvenile, right? But it serves a specific purpose. It lets somebody know, ‘I acknowledge that you just made a gift of your time and your resources.”

Want more tips on successfully launching and managing open source projects? Stay tuned for more insight from Matt Butcher’s talk, in which he provides specific project management issues faced by Kubernetes Helm.

For more information, be sure to check out The Linux Foundation’s growing list of Open Source Guides for the Enterprise, covering topics such as starting an open source project, improving your open source impact, and participating in open source communities.

Share your knowledge and expertise at Open Source Summit North Americahappening August 29-31 in Vancouver BC. Proposals are being accepted through April 29th.

Open Networking Summit

See the Top 10 reasons why you should attend Open Networking Summit NA.

You too could be one of 2,000 architects, developers, and thought leaders from over 300 companies coming together to drive the future of networking integration, acceleration and deployment. It’s not too late to register for Open Networking Summit NA happening March 26 – 29, 2018 in Los Angeles. 

See Who’s Attending! Participating companies at Open Networking Summit NA include:

Register Now>>

Top 10 Reasons to Attend

1. Visionary Keynotes Speakers : Thought leaders from Alibaba, Amazon Web Services, Amdocs, AT&T, Google, Huawei, Intel, Orange, Red Hat, Ticketmaster, Uber and more will deliver talks on the future of networking.

2. Networking Demos : LF Networking will showcase 8 community-driven demos (OPNFV, OpenDaylight, OpenvSwitch, ONAP, and DPDK) in the technology showcase. Additional demos will be featured at the Open Networking Foundation booth, the Acumos Project booth, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation booth, and across sponsor booths. Additional demos will be on-hand Tuesday and Wednesday as part of SOSR.

3. 70+ Conference Sessions : ONS NA 2018 content offers something for everyone. Two tracks specific to devops audience members, and two tracks for our business/architecture audience as well as general interest tracks. In total, sessions cover the hottest trends and technologies in networking today, including deep dives into integration with cloud native, containers, edge, IoT and more.

4. & 5. Developer Forums & Mini Summits: Join the Acumos Project, ARM, Ericsson, Intel, LF Networking, OpenContrail, Open Networking Foundation, and ARM for use cases, panel discussions, technical deep-dives, and more on Monday, March 26 and the morning of Tuesday, March 27 prior to ONS.

6. Onsite Attendee Reception & Solutions Showcase : Join fellow attendees for drinks, snacks, networking and the opportunity to check out 50+ demos and PoCs across the solutions showcase.

7. Training Courses : Get hands-on training for your SDN/NFV deployments post-event on OPNFV and ONAP.

8. All-Attendee Reception : Join fellow attendees at the iconic Majestic Downtown for a night filled with great food, drinks, networking, and entertainment.

9. Morning activities : Start your day with a 5K Fun Run or Morning Meditation.

10. Symposium on SDN Research (SOSR) : This co-located event provides an opportunity for industry and academia to jointly explore and debate recent developments related to all aspects of SDN.

VIEW THE FULL SCHEDULE >>

REGISTER NOW >>

Linux Foundation members and LF project members receive an additional 20% discount off current registration pricing, and academic, student, non-profit, and community discounts are available as well. Email events@linuxfoundation.org to receive your discount code.

Applications for diversity and needs-based scholarships are also being accepted. Click here for information on eligibility and how to apply.

Sign up to get the latest updates on ONS NA 2018!

SD-WAN

Shunmin Zhu, Head of Alibaba Cloud Network Services, offers insights on the future of Software Defined Networking (SDN) and the emerging SD-WAN technology.

The 2018 Open Networking Summit is rapidly approaching. In anticipation of this event, we spoke to Shunmin Zhu, Head of Alibaba Cloud Network Services to get more insights on two of the hot topics that will be discussed at the event: the future of Software Defined Networking (SDN) and the emerging SD-WAN technology.

“SDN is a network design approach beyond just a technology protocol. The core idea is decoupling the forwarding plane from the control plane and management plane. In this way, network switches and routers only focus on packet forwarding,” said Zhu.

“The forwarding policies and rules are centrally managed by a controller. From a cloud service provider’s perspective, SDN enables customers to manage their private networks in a more intelligent manner through API.”

Shunmin Zhu

Shunmin Zhu, Head of Alibaba Cloud Network Services

This newfound approach to networks that were previously thought to be nearly unfathomable black boxes brings welcome transparency and flexibility. And, that naturally leads to more innovation such as SD-WAN and Hybrid-WAN.

Zhu shared more information on both of those cutting-edge developments later in this interview. Here is what he had to say about how all these things come together to shape the future of the networking.

Linux.com:  Please tell us a little more about SDN for the benefit of readers who may not be familiar with it.

Shunmin Zhu: Today, cloud services make it very convenient for a user to buy a virtual machine, set up the VM, change the configurations at any time, and choose the most suitable billing method. SDN offers the flexibility of using network products the same way as using a VM. Such degree of flexibility was not seen in networks before the advent of SDN.

Before, it was unlikely for a user to divide his cloud network into several private subnets. In the SDN era, however, with VPC (Virtual Private Cloud) users are able to customize their cloud networks by choosing the private subnets and dividing them further. In short, SDN puts the power of cloud network self-management into the hands of users.

Linux.com: What were the drivers behind the development of SDN? What are the drivers spurring its adoption now?

Zhu: Traditional networks prior to SDN find it hard to support the rapid development of business applications. The past few decades witnessed fast growth in the computing industry but not so much innovation was seen in the networking sector. With emerging trends, such as cloud computing and virtualization, organizations need their networks to become as flexible as the cloud computing and storage resources in order to respond to IT and business requirements. Meanwhile the hardware, operating system, and network application of the traditional network are tightly coupled and not accessible to an outsider. The three components are usually controlled by the same OEM. Any innovation or update is thus heavily dependent on the device OEMs.

The shortcomings of the traditional network are apparent from a user’s perspective. First and foremost is the speed of delivery. Network capacity extension usually takes several months, and even a simple network configuration could take several days, which is hard for customers to accept today.

From the perspective of an Internet Service Provider (ISP), the traditional network could hardly satisfy the need of their customers. Additionally, heterogeneous network devices from multiple vendors complicate network management. There’s little that ISPs could do to improve the situation as the network functions are controlled by the device OEMs. User and carrier’s urgent need for SDN has made this technology popular. In a large extent, SDN overcomes the heterogeneity of the physical network devices and opens up network functions via APIs. Business applications can call APIs to turn on network services on demand, which is revolutionary in the network industry.

Linux.com: What are the business benefits overall?

Zhu: The benefits of SDN are twofold. On the one hand, it helps to reduce cost, increase productivity, and reuse the network resources. SDN makes the use of networking products and services very easy and flexible. It gives users the option to pay by usage or by duration. The cost reduction and productivity boost empowers the users to invest more time and money into core business and application innovations. SDN also increases the reuse of the overall network resources in an organization.

On the other hand, SDN brings new innovations and business opportunities to the networking industry. SDN technology is fundamentally reshaping networking toward a more open and prosperous ecosystem. Traditionally, only a few network device manufacturers and ISPs were the major players in the networking industry. With the arrival of SDN, more participants are encouraged to create new networking applications and services, generating tons of new business opportunities.

Linux.com: Why is SDN gaining in popularity now?

Zhu: SDN is gaining momentum because it brings revolutionary changes and tremendous business value to the networking industry. The rise of cloud computing is another factor that accelerates the adoption of SDN. The cloud computing network offers the perfect usage scenario for SDN to quickly land as a real-world application. The vast scale, large scope, and various needs of the cloud network pose a big challenge to the traditional network. SDN technology works very well with cloud computing in terms of elasticity. SDN virtualizes the underlay physical network to provide richer and more customized services to the vast number of cloud computing users.

Linux.com: What are future trends in SDN and the emerging SD-WAN technology?

Zhu: First of all, I think SDN will be adopted in more networking usage scenarios. Most of the future networks will be designed by the rule of SDN. In addition to cloud computing data centers, WAN, carrier networks, campus networks, and even wireless networks will increasingly embrace the adoption of SDN.

Secondly, network infrastructure based on SDN will further combine the power of hardware and software. By definition, SDN is software defined network. The technology seems to be prone to the software side. On the flipside, SDN cannot leave the physical network devices upon which it builds the virtual network. The difficulty to improve performance is another disadvantage of a pure software-based solution. In my vision, SDN technology will evolve towards a tighter combination with hardware.

The more powerful next generation network will be built upon the mutually reinforcing software and hardware. Some cloud service providers have already started to use SmartNIC as a core component in their SDN solution for performance boost.

The next trend is the rapid development of SDN-based network applications. SDN helps build an open industry environment. It’s a good time for technology companies to start businesses around innovative network applications such as network monitoring, network analytics, cyber security and NFV (Network Function Virtualization).

SD-WAN is the application of SDN technology in the wide area network (WAN) space. Generally speaking, WAN refers to a communications network that connects multiple remote local area networks (LANs) with a distance of tens to thousands of miles to each other. For example, a corporate WAN may connect the networks of its headquarters, branch offices, and cloud service providers. Traditional WAN solutions, such as MPLS, could be expensive and require a long period before service provisioning. Wireless networks, on the other hand, fall short in bandwidth capacity and stability. The invention of SD-WAN fixes these problems to a large extent.

For instance, a company can build its corporate WAN by connecting branch offices to the headquarters via virtual dedicated line and internet, also known as a Hybrid-WAN solution. The Internet link brings convenience to network connections between the branches to the headquarters while the virtual dedicated line guarantees the quality of the network service. The Hybrid-WAN solution balances cost, efficiency, and quality in creating a corporate WAN. Other benefits of SD-WAN include SLA, QoS, and application-aware routing rules – key applications are tagged and prioritized in network communication for a better performance. With these benefits, SD-WAN is getting increasing attention and popularity.

Linux.com: What kind of user experience do you think is expected regarding SDN products and services?

Zhu: There are three things that are most important to SDN user experience. First is the simplicity. Networking technologies and products sometimes impress users as over complicated and hard to manage. The SDN network products should be radically simplified. Even a user with limited knowledge in networking should be able to use and configure the product.

Second is the intelligence. SDN network products should be smart enough to identify incidents and fix the issues by itself. This will minimize the impact to the customer’s business and reduce the management costs.

The third most important thing is the transparency. The network is the underlying infrastructure to all applications. The lack of transparency sometimes makes users feel that their network is a black box. A successful SDN product should give more transparency to the network administrators and other network users.

This article was sponsored by Alibaba and written by Linux.com.

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Open Networking Summit

Last chance to save $605 on registration. Plus, check out the new keynote announcements.

ONS is the epicenter of idea exchange, decision making and project mapping across the open networking ecosystem. Attend this year, and join 2,000 architects, developers, and thought leaders to pave the future of networking integration, acceleration and deployment.

Newly Confirmed Keynote Speakers & Panelists:

    • Francis Arigo, Head of Architecture, Ticketmaster
    • Gavin Cato, SVP, Network Development Engineering, Dell EMC
    • Sarah Cooper, GM, IoT Analytics and Applications, Amazon Web Services
    • Alla Goldner, Director, Technology, Strategy and Standardization, Amdocs
    • Adan K. Pope, Chief Information Technology Officer, Ciena
    • Bill Ren, VP, Network Industry & Ecosystem Development, Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.
    • Chris Rice, SVP of AT&T Labs, Domain 2.0 Architecture and Design, AT&T
    • Dan Rodriguez, VP, Data Center Group & General Manager, Communications Infrastructure Division, Intel
    • Jehanne Savi, Executive Leader, All-IP & On-Demand Networks Program, Orange
    • Ayush Sharma, SVP of Engineering and Technology, Reliance Jio
    • Chris Wright, VP and Chief Technology Officer, Red Hat

Event Highlights Include:

Developer Forums: LF Networking, Open Networking Foundation, and the Acumos Project will be holding developer forums on Monday, March 26 and the morning of Tuesday, March 27 prior to ONS to provide developers an opportunity for deep technical discussions, cross-project collaboration, hacking and more.

Onsite Attendee Reception & Solutions Showcase: Join fellow attendees for drinks, snacks, networking and the opportunity to check out 50+ demos and PoCs across the solutions showcase.

Workshops & Tutorials: Stay tuned for details on add-on workshops & tutorials taking place Monday, Tuesday and Friday at ONS from Ericsson, Intel and more.

Training Courses: Get deep-dive training post-event on OPNFV, ONAP, and more.

All-Attendee Reception: Join fellow attendees at the iconic Majestic Downtown for a night filled with great food, drinks, networking, and entertainment.

Morning activities: Start your day with a 5K Fun Run or Morning Meditation.

Symposium on SDN Research (SOSR): Provides an opportunity for industry and academia to jointly explore and debate recent developments related to all aspects of SDN.

VIEW THE FULL SCHEDULE >>

You have 3 days left to save $605 on registration. Register by end of day on Saturday, March 10!

REGISTER NOW >>

Sign up to get the latest updates on ONS NA 2018!

Linux Foundation members and LF project members receive an additional 20% discount off current registration pricing, and academic, student, non-profit, and community discounts are available as well. Email events@linuxfoundation.org to receive your discount code.

Applications for diversity and needs-based scholarships are also being accepted. Click here for information on eligibility and how to apply.

Submit your proposal to speak at OS Summit Japan before the March 18th deadline.

Open Source Summit Japan and Automotive Linux Summit 2018 are once again co-located and will be held June 20-22 at the Tokyo Conference Center Ariake in Tokyo. Both events offer participants the opportunity to learn about the latest projects, technologies, and developments taking place across the open source ecosystem, and specifically in the Automotive Linux arena.

The deadline to submit a proposal is just 3 weeks away on Sunday, March 18, 2018. Don’t miss the opportunity to educate and influence hundreds of technologists and open source professionals by speaking at one of these events.

Tracks for Open Source Summit Japan include:

  • Cloud Native Apps/Serverless/Microservices
  • Infrastructure and Automation (Cloud/Cloud Native/DevOps)
  • Artificial Intelligence and Data Analytics
  • Linux Systems
  • Networking and Orchestration
  • Blockchain
  • Open Source Leadership, Compliance, Strategy and Governance

View a list of suggested topics and submit your proposal now

Suggested topics for Automotive Linux Summit include:

  • Connected Car, Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V), Vehicle-to-Cloud (V2C)
  • Security And Privacy
  • In-Vehicle Infotainment (IVI) & Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS)
  • Augmented Reality, Heads-Up Display
  • Delivering Live Content  And Updates To Vehicles In Motion
  • Legal Issues
  • Functional Safety And Open Source Software
  • W3C for Automotive
  • Non-AGL Technical Projects (e.g. Smart Roads, Self-Driving Vehicles, CarPlay, Android Auto)

View a full list of suggested topics and submit your proposal now

Get inspired! Watch presentations from Automotive Linux Summit & Open Source Summit Japan 2017

Watch all keynotes from Open Source Summit Japan >>

Watch all keynotes from ALS >>

Want to see your name on the list this year? Submit your proposal before the March 18 deadline.

Planning to attend? Register Now now to save $175 before early bird pricing ends!

Linux Foundation members and LF Project members receive an additional 20% discount off current registration pricing, and academic and non-profit discounts are available as well. Email events@linuxfoundation.org for discount information.

Applications for diversity and needs-based scholarships are also being accepted. Click here for information on eligibility and how to apply.

Sign up to get the latest updates on Open Source Summit Japan!