Posts

Open Networking Summit

Speak at the largest open networking and orchestration event of 2018.

The Linux Foundation has just opened the Open Networking Summit North America (ONS NA) 2018 Call for Proposals, and we invite you to share your expertise with over 2,000 technical and business leaders in the networking ecosystem. Proposals are due by 11:59pm PT on Jan. 14, 2018.

Over 2,000 attendees are expected to attend ONS North America 2018, taking place March 26-29 in Los Angeles, including technical and business leaders across enterprise, service providers, and cloud providers. ONS North America is the only event of its kind, bringing networking and orchestration innovations together with a focus on the convergence of business (CIO/CTO/Architects) and technical (DevOps) communities.

Sign up to get the latest updates on ONS NA 2018!

Open Networking Summit NA conference tracks will include the following topical areas:

Track 1: (General Interest) Networking Futures in IoT, AI, and Network Learning. Including discussions on the progress in standards and open source interworking to drive the industry forward. We’re also seeking topics on networking as it relates to Kubernetes, cloud native, network automation, containers, microservices, and the network’s role in connected cars and connected things.

Track 2: (General Interest) Networking Business and Architecture. We’re looking for proposals on how to effectively evaluate the total cost of ownership of hybrid (public/private, SDN/NFV + traditional, proprietary/open source) environments, including acquisition strategies and good cost models for open source solutions. We’re also interested in case studies of open source business models for solution providers.

Track 3: (Technical) Service Provider & Cloud Networking. We want to hear what you have to say about the containerization of service provider workloads, multi-cloud, 5G, fog, and edge access cloud networking.

Track 4: (Business & Architecture) Service Provider & Cloud Networking. We’re seeking proposals on software-defined packet-optical, mobile edge computing, 4G video/CDN, 5G networking, and incorporating legacy systems (legacy enterprise workload migration, role of networking in cloud migration, and interworking of carrier OSS/BSS/FCAPS systems).

Track 5: (Technical) Enterprise IT & DevOps. Share your experience on scale and performance in SDN deployments, expanding container networking, maintaining stability in migration, networking needs of a hybrid cloud/virtualized environment, and figuring out the roadmap from a cost perspective.

Track 6: (Business and Architecture) Enterprise IT (CXO/IT Architects). Do you have use cases to share on IoT and networking from the retail, transportation, utility, healthcare or government sectors? We’re looking for proposals on cost modeling for hybrid environments, automation (network and beyond), analytics, security and risk management/modeling with ML, and NFV for the enterprise.

View here for more details on suggested topics, and submit your proposal before the January 14 deadline.

Get inspired! Watch presentations from ONS 2017.

See all keynotes from ONS 2017.

Not submitting but planning to attend? Register by Feb. 11 and save $800!

Arpit Joshipura, GM of Networking and Orchestration at the Linux Foundation, shares his 2018 predictions for the networking industry.

1. 2015’s buzzwords are 2018’s course curriculum.

SDN, NFV, VNF, containers, microservices — the hype crested in 2016 and receded in 2017. But don’t mistake quiet for inactivity; solution providers and users alike have been hard at work with re-architecting and maturing solutions for key networking challenges. And now that these projects are nearing production, these topics are our most requested areas for training.

2. Open Source networking is crossing the chasm – from POCs to Production.

The ability for users and developers to work side by side in open source has helped projects mature quickly — and vendors to rapidly deliver highly relevant solutions to their customers. For example:

3. Top networking vendors are embracing a shift in their business models…

  • Hardware-centric to software-centric: value-add from rapid customization
  • Proprietary development to open-source, shared development
  • Co-development with end users, reducing time to deployment from 2 years to 6 months

4. Industry-wide adoption of 1-2 Network Automation platforms will enable unprecedented mass customization.

The need to integrate multiple platforms, taking into account each of their unique feature sets and limitations, has traditionally been a massive barrier to rapid service delivery.

In 2018, mature abstractions and standardizing processes will enable user organizations to rapidly onboard and orchestrate a diverse set of best-of-breed VNFs and PNFs at need.

5. Advances in cloud and carrier networking are driving skills and purchasing shifts in the enterprise.

The ease and ubiquity of public cloud for simple workloads has reset end user expectations for Enterprise IT. The carrier space has driven maturity of open networking solutions and processes. Enterprise IT departments are now at a crossroads:

  • How many and which of their workloads and processes do they want to outsource?
  • How can they effectively support those workloads remaining in-house with the same ease and speed users expect?
  • What skills will IT staff need, and how will they get them?

Which brings us to….

6. Prediction #1 will also lead off our Predictions list for 2019.

This article originally appeared on the ONAP website.

 

ONAP

“Bell has been engaged in the ONAP journey from day one and committed to get it to production to demonstrate its value,” said Tamer Shenouda, Director of Network Transformation for Bell.

Bell, Canada’s largest communications company, is the first in the world to deploy the open source version of the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) in production. Bell has built the capability to automate its data center tenant network provisioning on top of the ONAP Platform, providing its operations teams with a new tool to improve efficiency and time to market. This is the first step in using ONAP as a common platform across Bell’s networks on its journey towards a multi-partner DevOps model.

As part of the company’s Network 3.0 transformation initiative, Bell and its partners used Agile delivery to launch a minimum viable product with the platform and will continue to adapt it to ensure that it best supports the needs of Bell customers. This significant development sends a clear message to the industry that ONAP is ready and usable, and that carriers don’t need to implement all ONAP components from day one to start production. Bell has also leveraged the capabilities of ONAP Operations Manager to simplify deployments, drastically reduce footprint and enable continuous delivery.

“Bell has been engaged in the ONAP journey from day one and committed to get it to production to demonstrate its value,” said Tamer Shenouda, Director of Network Transformation for Bell. “This demonstration will encourage other partners to take a similar incremental approach in delivery and operations of the platform, and we look forward to other telecoms launching ONAP to production.”

ONAP is a Linux Foundation project that unites two major open networking and orchestration projects – Open Source ECOMP and the Open Orchestrator Project (OPEN-O). ONAP brings together top global carriers and vendors, using shared knowledge to build a unified architecture that allows any network operator to automate, design, orchestrate and manage services and virtual functions.

“We’re very proud to be the first member of the ONAP Project to demonstrate the viability of the platform live on our network,” said Petri Lyytikainen, Bell’s Vice President, Network Strategy, Services and Management. “The evolution of our advanced software-defined networks will enable us to respond even faster to the unique needs of our customers.” 

Bell is a founding Platinum Member of ONAP. Platinum members include: Amdocs, AT&T, China Mobile, China Telecom, Cisco, Cloudify, Ericsson, Huawei, IBM, Intel, Jio, Nokia, Orange, Tech Mahindra, Türk Telekom, Vmware, Vodafone, and ZTE.

OPNFV

The OPNFV project provides users with open source technology they can use and tailor for their purposes; learn how to get involved.

Over the past several weeks, we have been discussing the Understanding OPNFV book (see links to previous articles below). In this last article in the series, we will look at why you should care about the project and how you can get involved.

OPNFV provides both tangible and intangible benefits to end users. Tangible benefits include those that directly impact business metrics, whereas the intangibles include benefits that speed up the overall NFV transformation journey but are harder to measure. The nature of the OPNFV project, where it primarily focuses on integration and testing of upstream projects and adds carrier-grade features to these upstream projects, can make it difficult to understand these benefits.

To understand this more clearly, let’s go back to the era before OPNFV. Open source projects do not, as a matter of routine, perform integration and testing with other open source projects. So, the burden of taking multiple disparate projects and making the stack work for NFV primarily fell on Communications Service Providers (CSPs), although in some cases vendors shouldered part of the burden. For CSPs or vendors to do the same integration and testing didn’t make sense.

Furthermore, upstream communities are often horizontal in their approach and do not investigate or prioritize requirements for a particular industry vertical. In other words, there was no person or entity driving carrier grade features in many of these same upstream projects. OPNFV was created to fill these gaps.

Tangible and Intangible Benefits

With this background, OPNFV benefits become more clear. Chapter 10 of the book breaks down the tangible and intangible benefits further. Tangible benefits to CSPs include:

  • Faster rollout of new network services
  • Vendor-agnostic platform to onboard and certify VNFs
  • Stack based on best-in-class open source components
  • Reduced vendor lock-in
  • Ability to drive relevant features in upstream projects

Additionally, the OPNFV community operates using DevOps principles and is organized into small, independent and distributed teams. In doing so, OPNFV embodies many of the same practices used by the web giants. CSPs can gain valuable insight into people and process changes required for NFV transformation by engaging with OPNFV. These intangible benefits include insights into:

  • Organizational changes
  • Process changes
  • Technology changes
  • Skillset acquisition

OPNFV is useful not only for CSPs, however; it also provides benefits to vendors (technology providers) and individuals. Vendors can benefit from interoperability testing (directly if their products are open source, or indirectly through private testing or plugfests), and gain insights into carrier-grade requirements and industry needs. Individuals can improve their skills by gaining broad exposure to open source NFV. Additionally, users can learn how to organize their teams and retool their processes for successful NFV transformation.

The primary objective of the OPNFV project is to provide users with open source technology they can use and tailor for their purposes, and the Understanding OPNFV book covers the various aspects to help you get started with and get the most out of OPNFV. The last section of the book also explains how  you might get involved with OPNFV and provides links to additional OPNFV resources.

Want to learn more? You can download the Understanding OPNFV ebook in PDF (in English or Chinese), or order a printed version on Amazon. Or you can check out the previous blogs:

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]1. LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China
Developers, architects, sysadmins, DevOps experts, business leaders, and other professionals gathered in June to discuss open source technology and trends at the first-ever LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen (LC3) event in China. At the event, Linus Torvalds spoke about how Linux still surprises and motivates him.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23077″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]2. Toyota Camry Will Feature Automotive Grade Linux
At Automotive Linux Summit in Japan, Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), announced that Toyota has adopted the AGL platform for their next-generation infotainment system.The 2018 Camry will be the first Toyota vehicle on the market with the AGL-based system in the United States.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23078″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]3. Open Source Summit Debuts
As announced at last year’s LinuxCon in Toronto, this annual event hosted by The Linux Foundation is now called Open Source Summit. It combines LinuxCon, ContainerCon, and CloudOpen conferences along with two new conferences: Open Community Conference and Diversity Empowerment Summit.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23079″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]4. Joseph Gordon-Levitt at OS Summit North America
Actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt, founder and director of the online production company HITRECORD, spoke at Open Source Summit in Los Angeles about his experiences with collaborative technologies. Gordon-Levitt shared lessons learned along with a video created through the company.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23080″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]5. Diversity Empowerment Summit
Tameika Reed, founder of Women in Linux, spoke at the Diversity Empowerment Summit in Los Angeles about the need for diversity in all facets of tech, including education, training, conferences, and mentoring. The new event aims to help promote and facilitate an increase in diversity, inclusion, empowerment, and social innovation in the open source community.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23081″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]6. Hyperledger Growth
Hyperledger — the largest open blockchain consortium — now includes 180 diverse organizations and has recently partnered with edX to launch an online MOOC. At Open Source Summit in Los Angeles, Executive Director Brian Behlendorf spoke with theCUBE about the project’s growth and potential to solve important problems.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23082″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]7. Lyft and Uber on Stage at Open Source Summit
At Open Source Summit in Los Angeles, ride-sharing rivals Lyft and Uber appeared on stage to introduce two new projects donated to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. Chris Lambert, CTO of Lyft (on left), and Yuri Shkuro, Staff Engineer at Uber, introduced the projects, which help CNCF fill some gaps in the landscape of technologies used to adopt a cloud-native computing model.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23083″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]8. Attendee Reception at Paramount Studios
The Open Source Summit North America evening reception for all attendees was held at iconic Paramount Studios in Hollywood. Attendees enjoyed a behind-the-scenes studio tour featuring authentic Paramount movie props and costumes.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23084″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]9. 2017 Linux Kernel Summit and Kernel Development Report
Open source technologists gathered in the city of Prague, Czech Republic in October for Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference Europe. Co-located events included MesosCon Europe, KVM Forum, and Linux Kernel Summit, where The Linux Foundation released the latest Linux Kernel Development Report highlighting some of the dedicated kernel contributors.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23085″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]10. The Next Generation of Open Source Technologists
The Linux Foundation 2017 events aimed to inspire the younger generation with an interest in open source technologies through activities like Kids Day and special keynotes, such as those from 13-year-old algorithmist and cognitive developer Tanmay Bakshi, 11-year-old hacker and cybersecurity ambassador Reuben Paul (pictured here), and 15-year-old programmer and technologist Keila Banks.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23086″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]You can look forward to more exciting events in 2018. Check out the newly released 2018 Events calendar and make plans now to attend or to speak at an upcoming conference.

Speaking proposals are now being accepted for the following 2018 events:

Submit a Proposal[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Via collaboration of global, sustainable community, ONAP Amsterdam release addresses real-world SDN, NFV and VNFs just in time for 5G

San Francisco, November 20, 2017– The Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project today announced the availability of its first platform release, ONAP “Amsterdam,” which delivers a unified architecture for end-to-end, closed-loop network automation. ONAP is transforming the service delivery lifecycle for network, cable and cloud providers. ONAP is the first open source project to unite the majority of operators (end users) with the majority of vendors (integrators) in building a real service automation and orchestration platform, and already, 55 percent of the world’s mobile subscribers are supported by its members.

“Amsterdam represents significant progress for both the ONAP community and the greater open source networking ecosystem at large,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking and Orchestration, The Linux Foundation. “By bringing together member resources, Amsterdam is the first step toward realization of a globally shared architecture and implementation for network automation, based on open source and open standards. It’s exciting to see a new era of industry collaboration and architectural convergence – via a healthy, rapidly diversifying ecosystem – begin to take shape with the release of ONAP Amsterdam.”

The Amsterdam release provides a unified architecture which includes production-proven code from open source ECOMP and OPEN-O to provide design-time and run-time environments within a single, policy-driven service orchestration platform. Common, vendor-agnostic models allow users to quickly design and implement new services using best-of-breed components, even within existing brownfield environments. Real-time inventory and analytics support monitoring, end-to-end troubleshooting, and closed-loop feedback to ensure SLAs as well as rapid optimization of service design and implementations. Additionally, ONAP is able to manage and orchestrate both virtualized and physical network functions.

The entire platform has been explicitly architected to address current real-world challenges in operating tier-one networks. Amsterdam provides verified blueprints for two initial use cases, with more to be developed and tested in future releases. This includes VoLTE (Voice Over LTE), which allows voice to be unified onto IP networks. By virtualizing the the core network, ONAP is used to design, deploy, monitor and manage the lifecycle of a complex end-to-end VoLTE service. The second use case is Residential vCPE. With ONAP, all services are provided in-network, which means CSPs can add new services rapidly and on-demand to their residential customers to create new revenue streams and counter competitors.

“In six short months, the community has rallied together to produce a platform that transforms the service delivery lifecycle via closed-loop automation,” said Mazin Gilbert, ONAP Technical Steering Committee (TSC) chair, and vice president, Advanced Technology, AT&T Labs.This initial release provides blueprints for service provider use cases, representing the collaboration and innovation of the community.”

Ecosystem Growth Produces ONAP PoCs

With more than 55 percent of global mobile subscribers represented by member carriers, ONAP is poised to become the de facto automation platform for telecom carriers. This common, open platform greatly reduces development costs and time for VNF vendors, while allowing network operators to optimize their selection of best-of-breed commercial VNF offerings for each of their services. Standardized models and interfaces greatly simplify integration time and cost, allowing telecom and cloud providers to deliver new offerings quickly and competitively.

Member companies which represent every aspect of the ecosystem (vendors, telecommunication providers, cable and cloud operators, NFV vendors, solution providers) are already leveraging ONAP for commercial products and services. Amsterdam code is also integrated into proof of concepts.

Additionally, ONAP is part of a thriving global community; more than 450 people attended the recent Open Source Networking Days events to learn how ONAP and other open source networking projects are changing network operations.

More detailsincluding download information, white papers, solutions briefs and videoson Amsterdam are available here. Comments from members, including those who contributed technically to Amsterdam, can be found here.

What’s Next for ONAP

Looking ahead, the community is already beginning plans for the second ONAP release, “Beijing.” Scheduled for release in summer 2018, Beijing will include “S3P” (scale, stability, security and performance) enhancements, more use cases to support today’s service provider needs, key 5G features, and inter- cloud connectivity. Interest from large enterprises will likely further shape the platform and use cases in future releases.

ONAP will continue to evolve harmonization with SDOs and other other source projects, with a focus on aligning APIs/Information Models as well as OSS/BSS integration.

ONAP Beijing Release Developer Forum will take place on Dec. 11-13 in Santa Clara, California, and will include topics for end users, VNF providers, and the ONAP developer community via a variety of sessions including presentations, panels and hands-on labs.

ONAP community members and developers are encouraged to submit a proposal to share knowledge and expertise with the rest of the community: https://www.onap.org/event/submit-a-proposal-for-the-onap-beijing-release-developer-forum-santa-clara-ca

Additionally, ONAP will host a Workshop on “Container Networking with ONAP”  in conjunction with CloudNativeCon + KubeCon December 5 in Austin, Texas. The workshop is designed to bring together networking and cloud application developers to discuss their needs, ideas and aspirations for automating the deployment of secure network services on demand. Details and registration information: https://www.onap.org/event/cfp-submit-a-proposal-to-onap-mini-summit-at-cloudnativecon-kubecon-north-america-tuesday-december-5-2017

About the Open Network Automation Platform

The Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project brings together top global carriers and vendors with the goal of allowing end users to automate, design, orchestrate and manage services and virtual functions. ONAP unites two major open networking and orchestration projects, open source ECOMP and the Open Orchestrator Project (OPEN-O), with the mission of creating a unified architecture and implementation and supporting collaboration across the open source community. The ONAP Project is a Linux Foundation project. For more information, visit https://www.onap.org.

# # #

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

Additional Resources

Download ONAP Amsterdam

Amsterdam Architecture Overview

VoLTE Solution Brief

VCPE Solution Brief

Related videos

ONAP Blog

Join as a Member

 

Media Contact

Sarah Conway

The Linux Foundation

(978) 578-5300

sconway@linuxfoundation.org

Networking industry experts gather at the Orange Gardens facility outside of Paris, France on October 9, 2017, for the Open Source Networking Day event, hosted by Atos and Orange.

Something that we’ve learned at The Linux Foundation over the years is that there is just no substitute for periodic, in-person, face-to-face collaboration around the open source technologies that are rapidly changing our world. It’s no different for the open networking projects I work with as end users and their ecosystem partners grapple with the challenges and opportunities of unifying various open source components and finding solutions to accelerate network transformation. This fall, we decided to take The Linux Foundation networking projects (OpenDaylight, ONAP, OPNFV, and others) on the road to Europe and Japan by working with local site hosts and network operators to host Open Source Networking Days in Paris, Milan, Stockholm, London, Tel Aviv, and Yokohama.

This series of one-day events was a valuable opportunity for local ecosystems to meet and collaborate around the latest in open source networking. Heather Kirksey and Phil Robb of The Linux Foundation attended and spoke at the events to share our vision of the open networking stack, build relationships, and facilitate community collaboration. Our local site hosts were amazing—taking the lead on organizing, programming, and executing events in line with the needs and interests of their various regions. On behalf of The Linux Foundation, “thank you” to all our incredible site hosts, speakers, attendees, and sponsors: Amdocs, ATOS, Cloudify, Enter Cloud Suite, Ericsson, Huawei, Intel, Login, NEC, Nokia, Orange, Red Hat, SUSE, and Vodafone.

The feedback we’ve received on these events has been very positive. Attendees appreciated the opportunity to learn about the various components of the open networking stack, examine the integration and collaboration points between them, and map that to their strategies for rolling out cloud, SDN, NFV, MANO, and more across networks. By taking the OSN Days on the road, we were able to meet in-person with more than 460 people—from developers to service providers to vendors—venues near them with an agenda focused on their needs. Attendees also expressed their desire for more hands-on work (e.g. tutorials, demos, workshops, hackathons, etc.) and we are taking that into consideration for future OSN Days.

I encourage you to check out the great content from the latest tour. From the OSN Days Tour website, you can navigate to each tour page, and access all the slide presentations under the “View Session Slides” tab. You can also watch videos here from the OSN Day London Event, and read detailed recap blogs of both the London and Stockholm events, posted by site hosts directly.

The next tour is being planned for India in late January 2018, and other tours are being considered for North America and Asia—stay tuned. In the meantime, please consider joining an Open Source Networking User Group in your region.

We hope to see you next year at Open Networking Summit, an OSN Day, or an OSN user group meetup near you! Please email osndays@linuxfoundation.org with any questions.

Turkey’s Leader in Information and Communication Technologies Provider to Help Accelerate Open Source Innovation and Automation Globally

Orlando, Florida – November 15, 2017 — MEF 17’–The Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project continues its membership growth with the addition of new Platinum member Türk Telekom. Türk Telekom, Turkey’s world-class, integrated telecommunication and technology services provider, joining the project demonstrates both the continued ONAP momentum globally and growing commitment to open standards and open source.

With this collaboration and extension into Turkey, Türk Telekom will help accelerate ONAP globally and continue its mission to deliver a neutral automation platform for networks. Türk Telekom will also help ONAP execute the project’s plan for cloud providers and enterprises challenged to provide on-demand services profitably and competitively, while leveraging existing investments.  By unifying member resources, ONAP will accelerate the development of a vibrant ecosystem around a globally shared architecture and implementation for network automation–with an open standards focus–faster than any one product could on its own.

Türk Telekom joins 18 other global service providers and technology leaders that are platinum ONAP members including Amdocs, AT&T, Bell, China Mobile, China Telecom, Cisco, Ericsson, GigaSpaces, Huawei, IBM, Intel, Jio, Nokia, Orange, Tech Mahindra, VMWare, Vodafone and ZTE. In addition, 55 percent of the world’s mobile subscribers are supported by its members.

“We are delighted to invest in ONAP at the highest level and help guide the strategic, technical, and marketing direction for the project. As the only Turkish operator participating at ONAP, we believe joining the project is crucial for our  vision and helps us to better support technologies that our engineers are building,” said Cengiz Doğan, Chief Technology Officer of Türk Telekom. “We believe that ONAP has the ability to transform future networks by providing end-to-end, closed-loop automation to design, orchestrate, automate and manage new services.”

Türk Telekom offers its customers a complete range of mobile, broadband, data, TV and fixed voice services as well as innovative convergence technologies. With its rich history and continued growth, Türk Telekom is helping to advance Turkey into one of the largest telecom markets in EMEA. With its global presence, Türk Telekom will help drive the ONAP initiative into new regions and spread the continued adoption of open standards and open source. 

“We are delighted to welcome Türk Telekom to the project and expand the list of telecommunication and technology services providers supporting ONAP,” said Arpit Joshipura, General Manager of Networking and Orchestration, The Linux Foundation. “With Türk Telekom on board, we look forward to their ongoing POC development and together will collaborate to create the future of network automation.” 

About ONAP

The Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project brings together top global carriers and vendors with the goal of allowing end users to automate, design, orchestrate and manage services and virtual functions. ONAP unites two major open networking and orchestration projects, open source ECOMP and the Open Orchestrator Project (OPEN-O), with the mission of creating a unified architecture and implementation and supporting collaboration across the open source community. The ONAP Project is a Linux Foundation project. For more information, visit https://www.onap.org.

 

# # #

 

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

Media Contact

Sarah Conway

The Linux Foundation

(978) 578-5300

sconway@linuxfoundation.org

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]

OS Summit keynotes

Watch keynotes and technical sessions from OS Summit and ELC Europe here.

If you weren’t able to attend Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) Europe last week, don’t worry! We’ve recorded keynote presentations from both events and all the technical sessions from ELC Europe to share with you here.

Check out the on-stage conversation with Linus Torvalds and VMware’s Dirk Hohndel, opening remarks from The Linux Foundation’s Executive Director Jim Zemlin, and a special presentation from 11-year-old CyberShaolin founder Reuben Paul. You can watch these and other ELC and OS Summit keynotes below for insight into open source collaboration, community and technical expertise on containers, cloud computing, embedded Linux, Linux kernel, networking, and much more.

And, you can watch all 55+ technical sessions from Embedded Linux Conference here.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLQZzEvavGs&list=PLbzoR-pLrL6pISWAq-1cXP4_UZAyRtesk&index=1″][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”https://youtu.be/vO0_lhpeqas”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”https://youtu.be/YZXngLn5UJk”][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”https://youtu.be/OFx9qNee4hw”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”https://youtu.be/j6WNlX0TDsc”][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”https://youtu.be/ZS-mSwv5CoU”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”https://youtu.be/Ht3pkuKhZHc”][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”https://youtu.be/mCDXnls6pQk”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”https://youtu.be/Apw_fuTEhyA”][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”https://youtu.be/wLF53sc1TWM”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”https://youtu.be/jdB1FLIDALs”][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”https://youtu.be/W3jIuGLFrO4″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”https://youtu.be/IFi41eHP2uk”][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

By Fatih Degirmenci, Yolanda Robla Mota, Markos Chandras

The OPNFV Community will soon issue its fifth release, OPNFV Euphrates. Over the past four releases, the community has introduced different components from upstream projects, integrated them to compose different flavors of the stack, and put them through extensive testing to help establish a reference platform for Network Functions Virtualization (NFV). While doing this work, the OPNFV community strictly followed its founding principle: Upstream First. Bugs found or features identified as missing are implemented directly into upstream code; OPNFV has carried very little in its own source code repositories, reflecting the project’s true upstream nature. This was achieved by the use of stable release components from the upstream communities. In addition to the technical aspects of the work, OPNFV established good relationships with these upstream communities, such as OpenStack, OpenDaylight, FD.io, and others.

Building on previous experience working on integrating and testing different components of the stack, Euphrates brings applied learnings in Continuous Delivery (CD) and DevOps principles and practices into the fray, via the Cross Community Continuous Integration (XCI) initiative.  Read below for a quick summary about what it is, where we are now, what we are releasing as part of Euphrates, and a sneak peek into the future.

Upstream Development Model
The current development and release model employed by OPNFV provides value to OPNFV community itself and the upstream communities it works with, but is limited and dependent on using stable versions of upstream components. This essentially limits the speed at which new development and bugfixes can be contributed to upstream projects. This results in losing the essence of CI (finding issues, providing fast and tailored feedback) and means that the developers who contribute to upstream projects might not see results for several months, after everyone has moved on to the next item in their roadmap. The notion of constantly playing “catch up” with upstream projects is not sustainable.

In order for OPNFV to achieve true CI, we need to ensure that upstream communities implement a CD approach. One way to make this happen is to enable patch-level testing and consuming of components from master branches of upstream communities–allowing for more timely feedback when it matters most. The XCI initiative establishes new feedback loops across communities and with supporting tooling makes it possible to:

  • shorten the time it takes to introduce new features
  • make it easier to identify and fix bugs
  • ease the effort to develop, integrate, and test the reference platform
  • establish additional feedback loops within OPNFV, towards the users and between the communities OPNFV works with
  • provide additional testing from a production-like environment
  • increase real-time visibility

Apart from providing feedback to upstream communities, we strive to frequently provide working software to our users, allowing them to be part of the feedback loop. This ensures that while OPNFV pushes upstream communities to CD, the platform itself also moves in the same direction.

Helping Developers Develop by Supporting Source-Based Deployments
One of the most important aspects of XCI is to ensure developers do what they do best: develop. XCI achieves this by supporting source-based deployments. This means that developers can patch the source on their workstations and get their patch deployed quickly, cutting the feedback time from months to hours (or even minutes). The approach employed by XCI to enable source-based deployments ensures that nothing comes between developers and the source code who can even override whatever is provided by XCI to ensure the deployment fits their needs. Additionally, users also benefit as they can adjust what they get from XCI to further fit their needs. This is also important for patch-level testing and feedback.

Choice
What we summarized until now are firsts for OPNFV and perhaps firsts for the entire open source ecosystem; bringing multiple open source components together from master. But we have a few other firsts provided by XCI as part of the Euphrates release, such as:

  • multiple deployment flavors ranging from all-in-one to full blown HA deployment
  • multi-distro support: Ubuntu, Centos, and openSUSE
  • extended CI pipelines for all projects that choose to take part in XCI

This is another focus area of XCI: giving choice. We believe that if we offer choices to developers and users, they will leverage these options to invent new things or use them in new and different ways. XCI empowers the community by removing barriers and constraints and providing freedom of choice.

XCI utilizes tools such as Bifrost and OpenStack Ansible directly from upstream and what is done by XCI is to use these tools in a way that enables CI.

Join the Party
Are we done yet? Of course not. We are working on bringing even more components together and are reaching out to additional communities, such as ONAP and Kubernetes.

If you would like to be part of this, check the documentation and try using the XCI Sandbox to bring up a mini OPNFV cluster on your laptop. You can find XCI developers on #opnfv-pharos channel on Freenode and while you are there, join us to make things even better.

Finally, we would like to thank everyone who has participated in the development of XCI, reviewed our patches, listened to our ideas, provided hardware resources, motivated us in different ways, and, most importantly, encouraged us. What we have now is just the beginning and we are on our way to change things.

Heading to Open Source Summit Europe? Don’t miss Fatih’s presentation, “Bringing Open Source Communities Together: Cross-Community CI,” Monday, October 23, 14:20 – 15:00.

Learn more about XCI by reading the Solutions Brief or watching the video, and signing up for this XCI-based webinar on November 29th.

This article originally appeared on the OPNFV website.