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This week in Linux and open source headlines, ONAP leads the way in the automation trend, Mozilla launches new, open source speech recognition project, and more! Get up to speed with the handy Linux.com weekly digest!

1) With automation being one of the top virtualization trends of 2017, The Linux Foundation’s ONAP is credited with moving the industry forward

Top Five Virtualization Trends of 2017– RCRWireless

2) Mozilla has launched a new open source project speech recognition system that relies on online volunteers to submit voice samples and validate them.

Common Voice: Mozilla Is Creating An Open Source Speech Recognition System– Fossbytes

3)In addition to membership growth, EdgeX Foundry has launched a series of technical training sessions to help developers get up to speed on the project.

Linux’s EdgeX IoT Group Adds Members, Forms Governing Team– SDxCentral

4) Multicore Association announces availability of an enhanced implementation of its Multicore Task Management API (MTAPI.)

Open Source Tools Set to Help Parallel Programming of Multicores– ElectronicsWeekly.com

5) “OCI 1.0 will ensure consistency at the lowest levels of infrastructure, and push the container wars battlefront up the stack.”

OCI 1.0 Container Image Spec Finds Common Ground Among Open Source Foes– TechTarget

At the recent Open Networking Summit, the SDN/NFV community convened in Santa Clara to share, learn, collaborate, and network about one of the most pervasive industry transformations of our time.

This year’s theme at ONS was “Harmonize, Harness, and Consume,” representing a significant turning point as network operators spanning telecommunications, cable, enterprise, cloud, and the research community renew their efforts to redefine the network architecture.

Widespread new technology adoption takes years to succeed, and requires close collaboration among those producing network technology and those consuming it. Traditionally, standards development organizations (SDOs) have played a critical role in offering a forum for discussion and debate, and well-established processes for systematically standardizing and verifying new technologies.

Introduction of largely software (vs. hardware) functionality necessitates a rethinking of the conventional technology adoption lifecycle. In a software driven world, it is infeasible to define a priori complex reference architectures and software platforms without a more iterative approach. As a result, industry has been increasingly turning to open source communities for implementation expertise and feedback.

In this new world order, closer collaboration among the SDOs, industry groups, and open source projects is needed to capitalize upon each constituent’s strengths:

  • SDOs provide operational expertise and well-defined processes for technology definition, standardization, and validation
  • Industry groups offer innovative partnerships between network operators and their vendors to establish open reference architectures that are guiding the future of the industry
  • Open source projects provide technology development expertise and infrastructure that are guided by end-user use cases, priorities, and requirements

Traditionally each of these groups operates relatively autonomously, liaising formally and informally primarily for knowledge sharing.

Moving ahead, close coordination is essential to better align individual organizations objectives, priorities, and plans. SDN/NFV are far too pervasive for any single group to own or drive. As a result, the goal is to capitalize upon the unique strengths of each to accelerate technology adoption.

It is in the spirit of such harmonization that The Linux Foundation is pleased to unveil an industry-wide call to action to achieve this goal.

As a first step, we are issuing a white paper, “Harmonizing Open Source and Standards in the Telecom World,” to outline the key concepts, and invite an unprecedented collaboration among the SDOs, open source projects, and industry groups that each play a vital role in the establishment of a sustainable ecosystem which is essential for success.

The introduction of The Linux Foundation Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) is a tangible step in the direction of harmonization, not only merging OPEN-O and the open source ECOMP communities, but also establishing a platform that by its nature as an orchestration and automation platform, must inherently integrate with a diverse set of standards, open source projects, and reference architectures.

We invite all in the community to participate in the process, in a neutral environment, where the incentives for all are to work together vs. pursue their own paths.

Join us to usher in a new era of collaboration and convergence to reshape the future.

Download the Whitepaper

This week in open source news, The Linux Foundation’s Open Networking Summit unites software-defined networking and network functions virtualization (SDN/NFV) pros, academics, and enthusiasts for announcements and collaboration, Microsoft has announced the end of CodePlex in favor of GitHub, & more! Keep reading to get caught up on the biggest headlines in open source this week.
 
1) At the annual Open Networking Summit, SDN & NFV leaders gather. Announcements included the Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) becoming a Linux Foundation Project and CORD Project working on new OSS service delivery platform.
2) Microsoft “acknowledges that GitHub is the go-to option for project hosting” and announces the end of CodePlex in Q4.
 
3) ONAP Project names SVP of AT&T Labs Chris Rice as chair.
 
4) “After six years of pitching the dream of a converged Linux desktop experience that crosses desktop, mobile, server and cloud, Canonical pulls the plug.”
 
5) Uber’s open source deck.gl tool for data virtualization is getting scalable updates after being released in November.

This week in open source and Linux news, a talk on diversity in tech sparked a pithy article for The New Stack via Darryl Taft, The Linux Foundation consolidates two projects to form ONAP, and more. Keep reading for a curated look at the top OSS headlines of this past week. 

1) “Diversity in Open Source” talk at Open Source Leadership Summit tackled the challenges women and minorities still face in the tech industry. Darryl Taft comments. 

Amidst Bias, Women Work to Find a Place in Open Source Communities– The New Stack

2) The Linux Foundation seeks to consolidate two of its open source orchestration and management efforts.

Linux Foundation Creates New Platform for Network Automation– WSJ

3) “Google fuzzer helps find 11-year-old memory-corruption flaw in the Linux kernel.” Linux’s Decade-Old Flaw: Major Distros Move to Patch Serious Kernel Bug– ZDNet

4) “Xen Project helps to advance the state of MirageOS unikernel operating system with a new release that now supports the KVM hypervisor.”

MirageOS Unikernel Effort Moves Forward– eWeek

5) Valve releases SteamVR for Linux, letting developers “create Linux content for the HTC Vive VR headset, trackers and other hardware.”

Valve Launches SteamVR Support for Linux– Engadget