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The Linux Foundation currently hosts 9 of the 10 largest open source networking projects — a set of thriving global communities, such as ONAP, OPNFV, OpenDaylight, FD.io and others which together form the new networking stack. As a foundation, we believe in harmonization between open source and open standards with an eye towards supporting a range of emerging, network-dependent initiatives. As such, we are proactively working to bring communities with shared goals together to offer more value to those communities as well as to our members participating in multiple projects.

In the four years since OpenDaylight kicked off the open source networking revolution, innovative groups of developers from a range of backgrounds have developed open source offerings at every layer of the stack. It is now time to provide avenues for greater collaboration between those projects, as well as related projects and communities across the ecosystem. Therefore, we are creating a combined administrative structure, The LF Networking Fund (“LFN”), a platform for cross-project collaboration.

LFN will form the basis of collaboration across the network stack, from the data plane into the control plane, to orchestration, automation, end-to-end testing, and more. With 83 member organizations, it has the participation of:

  • 9 of the top 10 open source networking projects
  • More than 60 percent of global mobile subscribers enabled by participating companies
  • Most of the top 10 networking and enterprise vendors
  • Top systems integrators
  • Top cloud providers

*As of January 22, 2018. Subject to change.

Integrated governance, technical independence

Participation in LFN is voluntary; each networking project decides for itself whether and when to join. Under this new initiative, each of the projects will continue to operate under existing meritocratic charters, maintaining their technical independence, community affinities, release roadmaps, and web presence, while staff and financial resources are shared across member projects, via a unified governing board.

The six founding projects of LFN are:

What we can expect to see under this shared governance model is increased community collaboration focused on building a shared technical investment (without risk of fragmentation), while also providing space for inter-project architectural dependencies to flourish (e.g., multi-VIM collaboration, VNF onboarding, etc.). In addition, LFN enhances operational efficiency among existing communities by enabling projects to share development and deployment best practices and resources such as test infrastructure, and to collaborate on everything from architectural integration to industry event participation.

Following the example of the Linux Foundation’s Cloud Native Computing Foundation, LFN will bring similar cohesion to networking communities that in many cases are already working together. Over the past five years, LFN projects have dramatically accelerated networking innovations; together, they will enable data networking advancements at an unprecedented rate for decades to come.

For more information on the The LF Networking Fund (“LFN”), please visit our new website, which includes information on governance, membership, the new charter, and more.

Information related to specific LFN projects — including FD.io, OpenDaylight, OPNFV, ONAP, PDNA, and SNAS — remains available on each individual website.  

Join us at the largest open networking & orchestration event of 2018

We also invite you to join the open networking community at Open Networking Summit North America, March 26-29 in Los Angeles, where we will highlight the collaboration and innovation from LFN’s technical projects that is breaking new ground for end users on their journey towards adoption and deployment of open source networking. ONS will also feature the ONS LFN Developer Forum, a 1.5 day developer-focused forum that takes place prior to the ONS conference. There will be a cross-project plenary, and mix of presentation sessions and opportunities for breakout meetings/hacking in several rooms. Tracks are being programmed through the LFN project technical communities.

LFN members receive an additional 20% discount off current registration pricing. Please email events@linuxfoundation.org to receive your discount code.

For more information, join Arpit Joshipura, General Manager, Networking & Orchestration, at The Linux Foundation in a free webinar, “Open Source Networking: Harmonization 2.0,” Tuesday, Feb. 13, 10:00 a.m. Pacific.

Networking industry experts gather at the Orange Gardens facility outside of Paris, France on October 9, 2017, for the Open Source Networking Day event, hosted by Atos and Orange.

Something that we’ve learned at The Linux Foundation over the years is that there is just no substitute for periodic, in-person, face-to-face collaboration around the open source technologies that are rapidly changing our world. It’s no different for the open networking projects I work with as end users and their ecosystem partners grapple with the challenges and opportunities of unifying various open source components and finding solutions to accelerate network transformation. This fall, we decided to take The Linux Foundation networking projects (OpenDaylight, ONAP, OPNFV, and others) on the road to Europe and Japan by working with local site hosts and network operators to host Open Source Networking Days in Paris, Milan, Stockholm, London, Tel Aviv, and Yokohama.

This series of one-day events was a valuable opportunity for local ecosystems to meet and collaborate around the latest in open source networking. Heather Kirksey and Phil Robb of The Linux Foundation attended and spoke at the events to share our vision of the open networking stack, build relationships, and facilitate community collaboration. Our local site hosts were amazing—taking the lead on organizing, programming, and executing events in line with the needs and interests of their various regions. On behalf of The Linux Foundation, “thank you” to all our incredible site hosts, speakers, attendees, and sponsors: Amdocs, ATOS, Cloudify, Enter Cloud Suite, Ericsson, Huawei, Intel, Login, NEC, Nokia, Orange, Red Hat, SUSE, and Vodafone.

The feedback we’ve received on these events has been very positive. Attendees appreciated the opportunity to learn about the various components of the open networking stack, examine the integration and collaboration points between them, and map that to their strategies for rolling out cloud, SDN, NFV, MANO, and more across networks. By taking the OSN Days on the road, we were able to meet in-person with more than 460 people—from developers to service providers to vendors—venues near them with an agenda focused on their needs. Attendees also expressed their desire for more hands-on work (e.g. tutorials, demos, workshops, hackathons, etc.) and we are taking that into consideration for future OSN Days.

I encourage you to check out the great content from the latest tour. From the OSN Days Tour website, you can navigate to each tour page, and access all the slide presentations under the “View Session Slides” tab. You can also watch videos here from the OSN Day London Event, and read detailed recap blogs of both the London and Stockholm events, posted by site hosts directly.

The next tour is being planned for India in late January 2018, and other tours are being considered for North America and Asia—stay tuned. In the meantime, please consider joining an Open Source Networking User Group in your region.

We hope to see you next year at Open Networking Summit, an OSN Day, or an OSN user group meetup near you! Please email osndays@linuxfoundation.org with any questions.

Open source development is accelerating networking technology in areas including software-defined networking, open standards, and orchestration. Projects such as OPNFV, OpenDaylight, and recently open sourced ECOMP with many others hosted by The Linux Foundation, are helping drive open source networking innovation.

To help you learn more and give you a sneak peek of Open Networking Summit in April, Arpit Joshipura, General Manager, Networking & Orchestration at The Linux Foundation, will hold a free webinar next week exploring the following topics:

  • How has networking evolved and where is it heading?

  • A sneak peek at the future architecture of enterprises and service providers

  • Why automation at the network and orchestration layers have simplified adjacent markets and industries

“We are entering phase three of open source software-defined networking which is about production-ready solutions deployed at scale,” said Joshipura. “In this webinar, you’ll learn how various open source components come together to create an end-to-end solution.”

This webinar will discuss open source innovations and technologies that enable end-to-end solutions for enterprises, carriers, and cloud. It will also describe open standards and open architectures in adjacent markets such as containers, cloud native, and IoT.

Join SDxCentral and The Linux Foundation for “Open Source Networking & Orchestration: From POC to Production” on Thursday, February 9, 2017 at 10:00am Pacific. Register now >>

We are thrilled to announce that Hitachi has become the latest Linux Foundation Platinum member, joining existing Platinum members Cisco, Fujitsu, Huawei, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, NEC, Oracle, Qualcomm and Samsung. Hitachi has been a supporter of The Linux Foundation and Linux since 2000, and was previously a Linux Foundation Gold member. The company decided to upgrade its membership to Platinum in order to further support The Linux Foundation’s work, and open source development in general.

Hitachi is already a member of numerous Linux Foundation projects, such as Automotive Grade Linux, Civil Infrastructure Platform, Cloud Foundry Foundation, Core Infrastructure Initiative, Hyperledger and OpenDaylight. Platinum membership will enable Hitachi to help contribute further to these and other important open source projects.

Linux Foundation Platinum members have demonstrated a sincere dedication to open source by joining at the highest level. As a Platinum member, Hitachi will pay a $500,000 annual membership fee to support The Linux Foundation’s open source projects and initiatives. The company will also now occupy one of 14 seats on the Linux Foundation Board of Directors that are reserved for Platinum members.

 

This week in open source and Linux news, Steven J. Vaughan-NIchols challenges the critics of the new Linux Foundation-Microsoft membership news, Fedora 25 is easy for newbies to use, and more. Keep reading for all the latest top OSS news!

1) Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols challenges the Microsoft challengers.

Open Source Has Won, and Microsoft Has Surrendered– ComputerWorld

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Fedora 25

Fedora 25 makes Linux easy for n00bs. Read what else Alex Campbell has to say about the distro in his article for PCWorld.

2) “The Fedora community created one of the smoothest Linux Installation experiences ever [with Fedora 25.]”

Fedora 25 Makes Linux Easy Enough for Anyone to Try– PCWorld

3) “Let’s take a look at how wrong I was,” says Bryan Lunduke about his 2016 predictions from last year. 

2016 Linux Predictions: Which Ones Came True?– NetworkWorld

4) “The Node.js Foundation announced major milestones toward allowing the solution to work in a wide variety of VMs at the Linux Foundation’s Node.js Interactive conference this week.”

Notes from Node.js Interactive– SDTimes

5) OpenDaylight Project’s Neela Jacques investigates vendors’ practice of “openwashing.”

Are We in a Golden Age of Open Source or Just Openwashing?– NetworkWorld

Today The Linux Foundation is announcing that we’ve welcomed Microsoft as a Platinum member. I’m honored to join Scott Guthrie, executive VP of Microsoft’s Cloud and Enterprise Group, at the Connect(); developer event in New York and expect to be able to talk more in the coming months about how we’ll intensify our work together for the benefit of the open source community at large.

 

Microsoft is already a substantial participant in many open source projects and has been involved in open source communities through partnerships and technology contributions for several years. Around 2011 and 2012, the company contributed a large body of device driver code to enable Linux to run as an enlightened guest on Hyper-V. Microsoft has an engineering team dedicated to Linux kernel work, and since that initial contribution, the team has contributed improvements and new features to the driver code for Hyper-V on a consistent basis.

 

Over the past two years in particular, we’ve seen that engineering team grow and expand the range of Linux kernel areas it’s working on to include kernel improvements that aren’t specifically related to Microsoft products. The company is also an active member of many Linux Foundation projects, including Node.js Foundation, R Consortium, OpenDaylight, Open API Initiative and Open Container Initiative. In addition, a year ago we worked with Microsoft to release a Linux certification, Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate Linux on Azure.

 

The open source community has gained tools and other resources as Microsoft has open sourced the .NET Core, contributed OpenJDK, announced Docker support in Windows Server, announced SQL on Linux, added the ability to run native Bash on Ubuntu on Windows, worked with FreeBSD to release an image for Azure, and open sourced Xamarin’s software development kit and PowerShell. The company supports Red Hat, SUSE, Debian and Ubuntu on Azure. Notably, Microsoft is a top open source contributor on GitHub.

 

The Linux Foundation isn’t the only open source foundation Microsoft has committed to in 2016: in March, the company joined the Eclipse Foundation. A Microsoft employee has served as the Apache Software Foundation’s president for three years.

 

Linux Foundation membership underscores what Microsoft has demonstrated time and again, which is that the company is evolving and maturing with the technology industry. Open source has become a dominant force in software development–the de facto way to develop infrastructure software–as individuals and companies have realized that they can solve their own technology challenges and help others at the same time.

 

Membership is an important step for Microsoft, but it’s perhaps bigger news for the open source community, which will benefit from the company’s sustained contributions. I look forward to updating you over time on progress resulting from this relationship.

 

The Linux Foundation today released its third annual “Guide to the Open Cloud” report on current trends and open source projects in cloud computing.

The report aggregates and analyzes industry research to provide insights on how trends in containers, microservices, and more shape cloud computing today. It also defines the open source cloud and cloud native computing and discusses why the open cloud is important to just about every industry.

“From banking and finance to automotive and healthcare, companies are facing the reality that they’re now in the technology business. In this new reality, cloud strategies can make or break an organization’s market success. And successful cloud strategies are built on Linux and open source software,” according to the report.

A list of 75 projects at the end of the report serves as a directory for IT managers and practitioners looking to build, manage, and monitor their cloud resources. These are the projects to know about, try out, and contribute to in order to ensure your business stays competitive in the cloud.

The projects are organized into key categories of cloud infrastructure including IaaS, PaaS, virtualization, containers, cloud operating systems, DevOps, configuration management, logging and monitoring, software-defined networking (SDN), software-defined storage, and networking for containers.

New this year is the addition of a section on container management and automation tools, which is a hot area for development as companies race to fill the growing need to manage highly distributed, cloud-native applications. Traditional DevOps CI/CD tools have also been collected in a separate category, though functionality can overlap.

These additions reflect a movement toward the use of public cloud services and microservices architectures which is changing the nature of open source cloud computing.

“A whole new class of open source cloud computing projects has now begun to leverage the elasticity of the public cloud and enable applications designed and built to run on it,” according to the report.

To learn more about current trends in cloud computing and to see a full list of the most useful, influential, and promising open source cloud projects, download the report now.

1) Brian Behlendorf, developer of Apache web-server software, announced as the Hyperledger Project’s new executive director.

Internet Heavyweight Joins Open-Source Blockchain Consortium– Bloomberg

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Greg Kroah-Hartman

Senior Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman supervised the major security improvements in Linux 4.6. Full release review in Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols’ article for ZDNet

2) Linux 4.6 provides improved security, ARM support, & gaming hardware support. 

Linux 4.6 is a Major Release: Here’s What’s New & Improved– ZDNet

3) OpenDaylight executive director Neela Jacques explains the ubiquity of open source.  

The Shift in Open Source: A New Kind of Platform War– NetworkWorld

4) Adam Jaffe testifies in the Oracle’s copyright infringement case against Google.

Economist: There Was No ‘Fair Use’ of Java APIs in Android– eWeek

5) Major security vulnerability in the Symantec Antivirus Engine has been uncovered and could compromise Linux, Mac and Windows PCs.

Security Hole in Symantec Antivirus Exposes Windows, Linux and Macs– SecurityBrief NZ